The Conservation of "The Assassination of Archimedes"

Submitted by: squrlz4ever 2 weeks ago in Misc
An expert art conservator does his magic on a particularly challenging job.

There are 14 comments:
Female 8,529
i'm always slightly worried to see conservators adding anything. it was my understanding that good practice today was to conserve, nothing added
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Male 1,210
Very impressive work, I wonder what the bill was.
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Male 9,621
That was quite hypnotic. Nice before bed-time.
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Male 725
I want to see the bloopers reel. 
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Male 168
abetterworld .. at the 2:00 minute mark he describes Aristotle, not Archimedes, does that count as a blooper? 

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Male 725
agurney Nah. It should have him at some point saying “oh f*ck”!
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Male 10,070
The story of Archimedes' death is one of the great tales of antiquity. From Wikipedia:
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Archimedes died c. 212 BC during the Second Punic War, when Roman forces under General Marcus Claudius Marcellus captured the city of Syracuse after a two-year-long siege. According to the popular account given by Plutarch, Archimedes was contemplating a mathematical diagram when the city was captured. A Roman soldier commanded him to come and meet General Marcellus but he declined, saying that he had to finish working on the problem. The soldier was enraged by this, and killed Archimedes with his sword. Plutarch also gives a lesser-known account of the death of Archimedes which suggests that he may have been killed while attempting to surrender to a Roman soldier. According to this story, Archimedes was carrying mathematical instruments, and was killed because the soldier thought that they were valuable items. General Marcellus was reportedly angered by the death of Archimedes, as he considered him a valuable scientific asset and had ordered that he must not be harmed. Marcellus called Archimedes "a geometrical Briareus."

The last words attributed to Archimedes are "Do not disturb my circles," a reference to the circles in the mathematical drawing that he was supposedly studying when disturbed by the Roman soldier. This quote is often given in Latin as "Noli turbare circulos meos," but there is no reliable evidence that Archimedes uttered these words and they do not appear in the account given by Plutarch. Valerius Maximus, writing in Memorable Doings and Sayings in the 1st century AD, gives the phrase as "...sed protecto manibus puluere 'noli' inquit, 'obsecro, istum disturbare'" – "... but protecting the dust with his hands, said 'I beg of you, do not disturb this.'"
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Male 46,093
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Male 10,070
Gerry1of1 LOL... Archimedes would be proud, Gerry.
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Male 9,621
squrlz4ever Sad. But at 75 his best work was probably behind him ...
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Male 7,516
UGHHH..

Im yelling.. DONT PULL THE FUCKING TAPE OFF.. DA FUQ ARE YOU DOING..

That is brutal, How much would something like that even start to cost?  

A different question, how does restoration like that effect the worth of the painting?  I thought these things were always meant to be kept as close to the original as possible with no add-ons or alterations to maximize the value of the item?

I just wonder when do you restore a painting vs when you just put it in your airtight vault?
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Male 10,070
daegog I don't know, but I suspect that if the restoration is done correctly, it increases the value; done incorrectly, the value drops significantly.

In many cases, if a painting is in need of restoration, it's being damaged by its current state: mould or acids from smoke or dirt or expanding and contracting wood (as the case here) can all be causing the painting to degrade faster than it should. Buying a painting that's in need of restoration is a gamble because you don't know what problems the restorer might run into.
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Male 124
That is amazing..and DAMN nerve wracking!   I cringed so many times when he was removing that wooden backer piece!
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Male 10,070
shadistiger I agree. You've got to have strong nerves and a lot of confidence in your technique for this kind of work. If I hadn't seen the video, I wouldn't have thought that this kind of restoration was even possible.
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