The Louisiana Paradox

Submitted by: LordJim 1 month ago in Lifestyle Misc Weird
There are 27 comments:
Male 525
So just like Africa?
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Male 7,516
My nephew, got a job at Walmart... He said "We are the number one retailer in the US!"

I said "How much do you make"

He said "8.25 an hour"

I said "Then THEY are the number one retailer in the US, Never call yourself we because THEY do not give two shits about you."
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Male 7,612
daegog  I worked for them 
I worked in their photo department for a year before being moved to electronics I started at the rate of $6.25 which included hazard pay.
Also they are extremely anti union. If they   even
Suspect a union is forming they will close the entire store permantly.   
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Male 7,516
thezigrat I heard that about the union stuff, pretty brutal.
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Male 10,232
daegog Based on the two unions I’ve been in, that’s a smart move on Walmart’s part.
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170
megrendel You should do a little more research on Union's contributions to humanity, worker's rights, wages, paid time off, weekends and the rise of the middle class...
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Male 3,051
todd_dirks And extravagant vacations on your dues for the upper managers, spending your dues on political issues you don't agree with, getting boned when they call a strike while they don't miss a meal, you not working but still paying those dues. The day of the union is passed. I was in the laborers union. Never a union again!
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Male 10,232
todd_dirks YOU should Do a little more research on MODERN DAY Union’s contribution, intimidation, violence, corruption, and supporting the lazy, corrupt and lowest common denominator 
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Male 9,621
todd_dirks Nah, let the big corporations decide the rules. Anything else is socialism.
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LordJim Libertarianism: Replace Monarchs with Corporate Oligarchs and pretend we are somehow being different and better!
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Male 3,051
Yea but dem coon asses shore can cook. I made me a pot of Gumbo yesterday and had some fried Alligator to go with it.
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7,047
It all comes down to education. 
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170
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Male 10,232
todd_dirks In the case of Louisiana, it had been a Democrat Stronghold for the better part of a century until the last decade.
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170
@megrendel And my understanding is that since the Reds took over, slashed taxes to the rich, deficits have exploded, Jobs have crashed, School budgets have been halved... Correct me if I'm wrong though. I'm not completely up on Louisiana, but that is my basic understanding, as seems to be the go to method of being a 'fiscally responsible Conservative' 
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Male 9,691
megrendel Yea and those "Democrats" were Conservatives for a majority of that time
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Male 46,093
todd_dirks   The economy grows. No one said the money doesn't go to the rich.
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170
Gerry1of1 The economy grew under Obama, and continues to grow. Whether that is a result of giving money to the rich I would argue is false. The economy is driven primarily by people having a healthy disposable income. The wealthy do not stimulate the economy anywhere near the level of a healthy middle class. 

Therefore, the poorest regions are not necessarily contributing to the success of the American economy as a whole; instead, piggybacking off of it more than anything.
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Male 46,093
todd_dirks   I don't know about the economy / disposable income tie-in.  I don't know anyone who is better off now than they were 20 years ago. Most are about the same, not earning more. Some, like me, are doing far worse
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Gerry1of1 I would think it is just common sense really. Average people with disposable income spend more. That creates jobs via demand for product, driving industry. 

What the data seems to show is that the wealthy hoard. Amass fortunes. Do little to stimulate the economy. Good for the Stock Market (Seems to be where their money does the most playing) etc, not so good for jobs and working class wages etc.

So depending on how you look at a healthy 'economy', I guess you could extrapolate different desired meanings. 

Most Americans might feel they are doing about the same, and I'd say that's fairly accurate. At least until you begin to compare them to the wealthiest Americans, who have seen their incomes skyrocket and taxes plummet.

So perhaps it's better to ask ourselves if the average American is receiving their fair share of the healthy economy. 

Taking the totality of GDP in America, divided by the working population translates into every American adult getting an annual salary of $400,000 per year.

There's little justification for American wages to be below other western nations who are much more poor by comparison.

We know the gap between rich and poor in the US is increasing. Putting more dollars into the hands of working families would be a driver of industry and the economy as a whole. Not to mention just creating a more humane, equitable society in general.
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Male 46,093
todd_dirks I understand the theory of disposable income, I just don't see anyone with more than they had 10 years ago.
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170
Gerry1of1 Income has been pretty static for everyone except the top earners who were given a substantial reduction in their contribution to society. This can be seen an income cut for the bottom 60%. And we are now seeing the erosion of social programs, entitlements and benefits. 

This can also be seen as a cut in income to the working/lower classes and in some cases even the middle class. But the middle class is seeing more of a job destruction/export rather than decreasing wages.

With the assault on unions and organized labor & Socialism as a whole. I would say it will be slow, but things aren't about to look any better any time soon for the average American worker.

A slow, but steady destruction of middle class families combined with the slow descent of working class families down to and below the poverty line is about all one can extrapolate from the last couple of years of sentiment and policy coming out of the White House.
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Male 10,232
I'm pretty sure the fact that Louisiana has the highest rate of public corruption in the nation has a little something to do with it.  (see Huey P. Long, Ray Nagin, etc.)
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Male 2,015
megrendel Both are symptoms of the same disorder.
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Male 9,621
megrendel I'm sure it doesn't help.
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Male 1,540
LordJim Thanks for bringing this to my attention, nice post. It's one thing to hear daegog complain about wealth inequality, and another seeing citizens actually doing something constructive about it. 
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