A 4,000-Year-Old Tale Of Trade And Contraband

Submitted by: squrlz4ever 1 month ago in Misc
Another visit into the collections of the British Museum, this time with Curator Mathilde Touillon-Ricci.

There are 16 comments:
Male 55
Thanks to IAB, I've become an huge fan of Curator's Corner
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Male 5
It`s my favorite channel!
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Male 9,626
Curator's Corner is one of my favourite channels. 
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Male 10,075
LordJim I feel the same way. It's wonderful content. My dream life would be to receive a private talk and exhibition with each of these curators every Thursday evening. Short of that, these Curator's Corner videos are the next best thing.
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Male 2,345
Unless better evidence surfaces, Sumer invented civilization. 
This video shows that when they invented import/export duties, they inadvertently invented smuggling.
To make a criminal, make a law.
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Male 7,520
Ok, great video, but it was bugging the shit out of me that the curator is touching those tablets with her bare hands instead of with gloves.

She is getting her own body oils and stuff on those tablets, While they do not look fragile, anything that is 4000 years old and important should be handled with more care imo.
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Male 9,626
daegog I think we can assume she knows her job. 
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Male 10,075
daegog The British Museum actually has made a video that specifically addresses the "Why no gloves?" questions. Long story short: It depends on the type of item. For some categories of antiquities, it's considered to be a better practice for the curators to wash their hands immediately before handling the objects and then handle them without gloves. Ceramics are one of those categories.

The British Museum curators love these objects more than you can imagine, and it seemed to me from the video that they are constantly researching the best techniques.
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Male 10,075
Just a couple observations I want to share. First, talk about a rare skill! I wonder how many living humans are able to read ancient Sumerian/cuneiform. I'd guess that Ms. Touillon-Ricci is in a select group numbering no more than 500 worldwide.

I once learned about the number of cuneiform tablets that are in museums that have not yet been translated, and it's staggering: Over 100,000 if I remember correctly. The mind boggles. Who knows what could be on some of those tablets? It's just fascinating to think about.
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Male 4,118
squrlz4ever "Who knows what could be on some of those tablets?"

With my luck, it's the missing instructions to my Ikea furniture. Now how am I going to finish my flinafirgin?  
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Male 2,345
robthelurker "Now how am I going to finish my flinafirgin?"
Have you considered a driptorch?
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