Dish Of The Week: Misr Wat, From Ethiopia

Submitted by: Essen 1 month ago in Lifestyle


This dish is from Ethiopia. Ethiopian food has influence from arabic culture as well as italian. But it is distinctively Ethipian. If you like spicey food or dishes based on beef Ethiopia is the place. I have been using berbere now for a year and I have to say it gives everything an extra kick.

There are two main spice blends that is used in the cooking a)berebere, b)mitmita

This recipe is from this website. It also includes the recipe for Tibs as well.

INGREDIENTS
1 kg red lentils*
1 kg yellow onions, finely diced
½ head garlic
½ tube tomato paste
2 tbsp berbere spice mix**
1½ tsp ground cumin
1½ tsp ground black pepper
1 tsp salt
½ cup vegetable oil

METHOD
Wash the lentils under running water, drain, and reserve.
Heat oil in a pot over medium heat. Add the onions and fry until softened and translucent, about 10 minutes.
Add the berbere, tomato paste, and ¼ cup water and simmer for 5 minutes.
Turn down the heat to low and add the garlic, cumin, pepper and salt. Simmer for half an hour.
Add ½ cup water, then the lentils, and let cook 5 minutes.
Add another cup of water and simmer for 20 minutes, stirring every few minutes to prevent the lentils from sticking to the bottom of the pot.

*Red lentils are pretty much dal-lentils so if you can't get red lentils buy som dal instead. (try to get the largest size dal possible.

**If you can, buy berbere (since some of ingredients are not easy to find). But if you can not get it HERE is a recipe on how to make it. 

Serving suggestions: with injera  (Ethipian bread/pancakes), in burrito, as side dish or just plan with some boiled potatoes or bread. 
There are 15 comments:
Female 8,514
Never knowingly put anything in my mouth which hurts. not a fan of spicy food- my sister loves it.
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3,632
yum yum, get in my tum tum. I'll be checking this one out. 
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Male 45,280
Sounds good. I love trying new recipes. 
But Lentils are high in carbs so maybe on my next cheat day off  the diet.
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Male 269
Gerry1of1 In that case try this Doro Wat until your cheat day ;)
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Male 45,280
Essen   I think most cultures have a version of Doro Wat. It's just chicken with hot spices {chili or other}   But I do want to try that Berbere spice.
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Male 269
Gerry1of1 It is really good. If you like beef Etiopian cuisine is taylor mafde for it (they have a lot of cattle). Their version of sushi is with beef.
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Male 45,280
Essen Every year for our birthdays {1 month apart} my son and I go to dinner. I pick a different international cuisine.  I've always liked Ethiopian, it was his first time. His ass burned for a week on the toilet. LOL .... I love it, he's scared of it now.
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Male 18,342
Gerry1of1 how did you end up with a son?
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Male 45,280
Draculya The usual way. A sperm meets and egg and a child is produced.
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Male 269
Gerry1of1 ROFL. He'll learn to appreciate it (or fear it).
If you have any tips on international cuisine I am all ears.
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Male 45,280
Essen Tip... Russian is boring.  It's all beets and cabbage with a small bit of lamb.
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Male 1,975
Gerry1of1 "Russian is boring.  It's all beets and cabbage with a small bit of lamb."
You left out potatoes. You haven't lived until you've tried a white bread bun stuffed with smashed potatoes. If you're thinking that doesn't sound very good, you're getting the idea.
I have never had good-tasting food from a Russian deli or restaurant. You have to know a Russian cook, or learn to do it yourself.
Borscht, made right, is unbeatable. I don't have recipes for anything, because I learned from Russians who didn't have recipes. You just have to get the ingredients together and get into the Russian state of mind.
Most of the Russian food I learned how to make, I learned in the kitchen of a mother/daughter combination (the daughter was twice my age and weight, and her whip-thin mother couldn't have weighed more than 80 pounds.) One spoke Russian, French and some English and the other spoke only Russian and German. They disagreed on amounts and preparation methods, and I sometimes wanted to be able to ring a bell to end a round and send them to their corners. But, oh my god, they could cook! 
I met them through their son/grandson. Once he and I were sampling vodkas from the freezer, when the grandmother walked into the kitchen and started chewing us out. I thought she was upset that we were drinking in the morning, but she was saying 'zakuskiy nuzhno' (you need snacks). She started pulling covered dishes out of the refrigerator, and put together a veritable buffet. Then she sat down and poured herself a drink.
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Male 45,280
semichisam01 Okay...... I haven't lived. But I'm okay with that. 
From what I have tasted in expensive Russian Cuisine restaurants
I don't think a few potatoes will really add much to it.

Vodka is the only thing russians have given  the world.
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Male 1,975
Gerry1of1 "Okay...... I haven't lived."
My opening remark was a joke. When I bought one of those (deep-fried) buns in a Russian deli I almost could not believe anyone would do such a thing with food.
There are some good Russian potato recipes, but vodka is the best by far. Unfortunately, the last great potato vodka, Stolichnaya, is no longer made from potatoes, or in Russia.
Vodka made from wheat is just grain alcohol.
There are a number of potato vodkas available now, but I have given up vodka, except for a rare glass from my old stash. I prefer it steeped in buffalo grass. It's called zubrovka, and it must be consumed straight from the freezer in a frozen shot glass. Throw it back over the tongue, then eat something high in fat. Don't worry about not tasting it when it goes down. You will taste it for a little while afterwards.
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Male 269
YAY! It worked.
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