EPA Is Now Allowing Asbestos Back Into Manufacturing

Submitted by: daegog 5 months ago in News & Politics

I wonder what moron thought this was a good idea.

An excerpt from Arch Paper: One of the most dangerous construction-related carcinogens is now legally allowed back into U.S. manufacturing under a new rule by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). On June 1, the EPA authorized a “SNUR” (Significant New Use Rule) which allows new products containing asbestos to be created on a case-by-case basis.

According to environmental advocates, this new rule gives chemical companies the upper hand in creating new uses for such harmful products in the United States. In May, the EPA released a report detailing its new framework for evaluating the risk of its top prioritized substances. The report states that the agency will no longer consider the effect or presence of substances in the air, ground, or water in its risk assessments.

This news comes after the EPA reviewed its first batch of 10 chemicals under the 2016 amendment to the 1976 Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA), which required the agency to continually reevaluate hundreds of potentially toxic chemicals to see whether they should face new restrictions or be removed from the market. The SNUR greenlights companies to use toxic chemicals like asbestos without thinking about how it will endanger people who are indirectly in contact with it.

Asbestos, once seen as a magical mineral, was widely used in building insulation up until it was banned in most countries in the 1970s. The U.S. is one of the only developed nations in the world that has placed significant restrictions on the substance without banning it completely. New data revealed that asbestos-related deaths now total nearly 40,000 annually, with lung cancer and mesothelioma being the most common illnesses in association with the toxin. That number could rise if new asbestos-containing products make their way into brand new buildings.

Healthy Building Network (HBN), an environmental advocacy group, recently told Fast Company that the fibrous material poses a major health risk for everyone exposed to it, including those who mine it, those who handle it in industrial facilities, as well as people near or inside renovation and construction projects where it’s being used. HBN’s Board President Bill Walsh said that the chlor-alkali industry is the only industry in the country that still uses asbestos, reportedly importing about 480 tons of the carcinogen each year from Russia and Brazil.

Walsh also pointed out that chlorine-based plastics are commonly found in building-product materials and that “virtually all” asbestos in the U.S. is used in the industrial process to make chlorine. This includes PVC and vinyl plastics, which is largely found in the creation of pipes, tiles, flooring, adhesives, paints, and roofing products.
There are 12 comments:
Female 5,290
the same people that tell you all these other dangerous things are safe! yay asbestos! yay cancer!
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Male 1,124
What, the P is no for Pilfering? How about Profiteering? Phucking?
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Male 46,107
Why not? Just don't smoke it, you'll be fine.
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Male 18,342
"I wonder what moron thought this was a good idea."

I'll bet it's a republican.
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Male 7,635
Draculya it was Trump
He stated 4 months ago he was going to allow asbestus in buildings again
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Male 13,505
I don't understand why they would do this.  There's someone who does research on following the money of things, and they reported a few years back that someone purchased some buildings, which were made with asbestos, which the owner was then required to fix, and would have run into 100's of millions.  But instead of fixing it, the building owner took out a huge insurance policy, going the distance to add 'terrorist' insurance.  Well, just a few short months later, the media reported 'terrorist attack' on two of the owner's buildings, and it just so happened those two towers fell on that day (surprising to most people who knew about high school physics), and the owner managed to get 4.5 billion payout.  Scientists are growing in number in agreement that it was fraudulent because the building destruction would have required extra energy that wasn't supplied during the 'terrorist attack'.  Also quite a few responders and people who were near the falling buildings suffering severe damage due to those carcinogens (now in dust form) being spread all through the downtown core and people breathing it in.  Not to mention the people noticing strange things up to the day they fell.  The owner now had money to put to new buildings, and didn't have to pay a cent for cleanup - that was put on the shoulders of the taxpayer, and it only cost the lives of those who inhaled the dust.  So unless they are considering this criminal act again in the future, it makes no real sense why they would want to do this.
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Male 10,234
monkwarrior And here's the second moronic idea in the thread....
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Male 13,505
megrendel so you're for the use of asbestos?
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Male 10,234
monkwarrior Your reply had nothing to do with asbestos except to make a huge mental gymnastics leap to try and tie it some bullshit conspiracy theory.

But, if you'd like to discuss asbestos rather than ramble on about 'Dubya did it', then lets do this.

Asbestos is dangerous.  But only in it's fibril form.  Its dust can remain suspended in an area indefinitely and you do not want to breath it. So, you don't want to mine it or build with it.  BUT, they didn't find this out until much had been built with it.  

It is not dangerous in place.  In truth, it created more problems tearing it out of a building than leaving it.
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Male 286
monkwarrior Does everything need to be a conspiracy with you?
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295
guy across the street has mesothelioma.  Horrible.  Worked n ship building back in the 50's.  I worked in the insurance industry in the claims side and every once in awhile we'd stumble across a house that had asbestos in it.  Nasty job to clean up.  But in a lot of cases it wasn't too dangerous unless it brcame friable (airborne particulate).Popcorn celings could be nasty, but floor tiles were pretty benign.  Tough to inhale a floor tile.
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Male 158
kelly_hanna After I left school 15 in the UK (we finish school at 15-16 unless we stay on for A-levels) I was taken on as an Apprentice Electrician at the Corby steel works. Worked there for 12 years. Its a massive site with many mills and first construction was in the 30's. There was Asbestos *everywhere* in there. Its a great insulating material and pretty cheap, ideal for a steel mill. There were vast sections of it all over the plant roofing as insulation and fire retardant even when I worked there in the 90's-00's. 

We would section off area's if we needed to work around it and call in specialized contractors to remove it before working there. Of course there was still a TON of dust after they left. They basically just pulled it off the roof and let it drop the 40 or so feet to the floor, then cleaned it up from there. Steel makes scale when heated, scale (Steel dust) gets *everywhere* and mixes with asbestos pretty well. Made for a not fun working environment when we had to deal with it. In my 40's now and touch wood, not ill yet. Hoping to stay that way!!!

Vacation time there told a tale. After 2 weeks off you'd finally Stop coughing up black crap (Scale) and start to feel normal again, only to go back in there. And facial hair? No chance. I was clean shaven my whole time there. A beard just attracted scale and your face would be black by end of shift. Steel mills are decent pay, but not a great work environment. 
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