Squrlz4Ever

Registered bored user

You lookin' at me?

squrlz4ever wrote:
piratefish I love Emmy; I certainly don't want to "crucify" her. I disagree with a few of her ideas here, and agree with others. That happens. No biggie.
squrlz4ever wrote:
boredhuman Honestly, I think you're the one who's stuck on repetition. Monk's made his position clear several times already. He says the citizens themselves need to figure it out once they've created the space in which to do so.

If you're looking for Monk to provide a detailed plan, you're barking up the wrong tree. He's acting in the role of prophet, delivering a jeremiad, trying to rouse others to action. He isn't trying to fill the role of the intellectual who wants to discuss the finer points of what mechanisms might make for a better government.

Regarding the American Revolution versus the French Revolution, there's no political sense in trying to get Americans to be inspired by the French (who were inspired by the Americans). Most Americans associate the French with socialism and the French Revolution with the Reign of Terror.
squrlz4ever wrote:
piratefish Bah. Today's guns were absolutely not around in 1791. If any law-abiding adult wants to own a four-foot long single-shot musket today, complete with ramrod, I have no problem with that.
squrlz4ever wrote:
boredhuman I dunno, BH. I think Monk's made his position pretty clear at this point: He think the U.S. government has become such a mess that the citizens need to start over. When the Founding Fathers decided a break with England was necessary, they didn't have a plan in place as to what would replace it. That took a constitutional convention.

I know it can be frustrating to try to debate with Monk--I've lost my temper with him on a couple occasions--but for some reason I seem to have come through the fire out on the other side. Monk has strong opinions on a variety of topics. His views aren't changing. So unless you want to drive yourself nuts, you sort of have to shrug and say, "Each to his own."

I actually think Monk's political views are the most sensible of his positions. Our political system is, indeed, dysfunctional and I don't know that it can be corrected by tinkering with it. Most of the tools to effect change that are built into the the current system are broken. I'm pretty sure at least one of the Founding Fathers--Jefferson, namely--if he observed the current state of affairs, would advise that it's time to start over.
squrlz4ever wrote:
monkwarrior Monk, that website you linked to--is that your creation? Not a trick question and I'm not trying to argue. I'm genuinely curious.
squrlz4ever wrote:
Those things really are a masterpiece of engineering, aren't they?
squrlz4ever wrote:
dieseljuice1891 What do you mean by "AM I THE ONLY ONE?" Try to answer carefully, please.
squrlz4ever wrote:
Fojos For those keeping count, Fojos is either 5Cats' third or fourth sockpuppet account. It's hard to keep track, frankly.

squrlz4ever wrote:
5cats Be sure to log out of your 5Cats account so you can respond to me as Fojos, 5Cats.

Just how many sockpuppet accounts do you have?
squrlz4ever wrote:
Gerry1of1 Hmmm. You may have a point there. I need to learn something about how America's treatment of mental illness compares to the other developed nations.  O.O  Yet another subject to research. Darn you!
squrlz4ever wrote:
Gerry1of1 Every country has a mental health problem. But no other developed nation has mass shootings like we do.
squrlz4ever wrote:
Gerry1of1 How about if I run out into the middle of the road in front of your car and then reverse directions two or three times? Would that be bad?
squrlz4ever wrote:
Fojos Guns are not strictly forbidden in Sweden. Any responsible hunter, competitive shooter, or collector who wants them can own as many as six, provided he or she has belonged to a shooting club for six months or passed a firearms proficiency course. Sensible laws, if you ask me.
squrlz4ever wrote:
Gerry1of1 I dunno. The guy in the SUV rammed the side of the spitter's car, which ratcheted things waaaaaaaaaaay up in terms of danger and property damage. If the spitter had been a little slower getting into his car, he could've lost his hand.

Do you think the SUV driver was just trying to go around the spitter? It seemed to me he was deliberately trying to ram him.
squrlz4ever wrote:
Here's a link in case, like me, you weren't seeing the video here.

They were both acting like jerks. Those SUVs: They are seriously top-heavy and will roll over if you sneeze suddenly, as this video shows. I used to joke that the Nissan Xterras make such a big deal out of carrying a first aid kit (the rear panel of the car is shaped to accommodate it) because so many of the Xterra drivers need to be treated on-scene for rollover injuries.

squrlz4ever wrote:
bearbear01 I was researching this a bit last night. If you live in a cold winter region, it is, indeed, important to get the bees to understand that it's winter. For that reason, it helps to keep the observation hive in the coldest room in your house and to keep the bee passage leading to the outdoors open, so that the bees can feel the cold air.
squrlz4ever wrote:
Gerry1of1 Bzzz bzzz bzzz bzzz. I had no idea you were such a friend of the bees. You should get a beehive. Are you considering it? Do you have some yard space in the back of your house? I don't think it requires much room. Some people actually keep beehives in the city.
squrlz4ever wrote:
Gerry1of1 I did a smidgen of research. Apparently, observation hives are considered good by serious beekeepers. Some of them apparently allow you to harvest honey from them, but I'm not sure how that would work without you getting a houseful of bees.

It seems that most people who have observation hives usually start out with one or more traditional hives, and they add the observation hive simply because they enjoy bees so much.

I couldn't find any information as to whether bees do better in observation hives due to the warmer winter temperatures or not.
squrlz4ever wrote:
Bzzzz bzzzz bzzzz bzzzz bzzzz bzzzz bzzzz bzzzz.

So it looks like you can't get any honey from these things. That's okay, I suppose, assuming your only interest is to provide free lodging for the bees.

I expect there will be some downsides. If you get a bad mite infestation, the colony could die and then you've got a very messy cleaning project on your hands. And I'm not sure how you'd go about introducing a new colony of bees into this setup once you've got it all cleaned out and disinfected.

Then there's always the chance that your bees will decide to swarm one day and you'll get a call from a neighbor who's got your bees hanging out on his porch.

I wonder if bees would do better in this kind of setup than they would with a traditional hive placed outdoors. Would the warmer temperatures of an indoor hive like this in the winter be a big advantage? I need to do a bit of research.
squrlz4ever wrote:
waldo863 You could be right. But per my other comment, I would think that someone who wanted to try using a drug surreptitiously wouldn't do it shortly before he had to get on a bus with all his friends.

Update: I just checked for the latest information on this story. Filippidis is now back in Toronto after a brief interview with the New York State Police. The case is still open and still under investigation.

The things I'm wrestling with are the following. Filippidis says he has almost no memory of what happened to him. He said he thinks he might have had a head injury. And yet:

  • There were no signs of any kind of head injury: no bump, so scrape, nothing.
  • He chose to remain behind on the mountain when everyone else went inside, which meant he had made some effort to be alone just prior to his disappearance.
  • He left his cell phone in his lodge instead of taking it out on the slopes with him, which is what most people would do. By leaving the cell phone behind, it was impossible to use its GPS to find him.
  • Somehow, he can't remember what happened to him, but he could remember the following: his name, which he gave to police in California; his PIN for his credit card, which he used to take out $1,000; and his own home telephone number, which he used to call his wife. He also told the police in California that he was a missing person and that people in New York State were looking for him.
squrlz4ever wrote:
waldo863 I agree that his insistence on doing a final run by himself is suspicious. I have a hard time thinking he was planning to do drugs at that point for a couple reasons. First, he has no history of drug or alcohol problems according to his family and he seems a little old to be experimenting with them. Second, I'm not sure someone would decide to do drugs knowing that they're supposed to be getting on a bus with their group in under an hour. It just doesn't make sense to me.

I'm leaning toward the idea that he had chosen to disappear, either to start a new life or as part of a plan to commit suicide. I think he insisted on the final solo ski run so that he could leave unobserved.

The other possibility is something Skeeter mentioned: a fugue state. I know next-to-nothing about that topic, however, and need to read more.

So bizarre.
squrlz4ever wrote:
Bigtoe2 That was interesting. Thanks. I've never been to Costa Rica and I knew nothing about the Costa Rican variant of bullfighting.
squrlz4ever wrote:
skeeter01 LOL! My face is hurting from laughing.
squrlz4ever wrote:
robthelurker Damn. You better get going on another screenplay. I like it, and I'm going to add it to the list.

How awesome would it be to be sitting in a movie theater, watching this man socializing with friends on a Lake Placid ski trip, and then have the movie go in that direction? It would be a little like Being John Malkovich.