I Am Bored

Loads of viral videos, games, memes, lists and social networking for when you're bored. Updated every day, so visit often.
LatestPopularMost BookmarkedMost EmailedTop RatedMy FavoritesRandomChat
AllGamesFunnyEntertainmentQuizzesWeirdTechLifestyle, Arts & Lit.News & PoliticsScienceSportsMisc
Submit Content  





rss

friendsmore friends | add your site
Asylum

Holy Taco

Funny Videos

BuzzFeed

NothingToxic

Oddee

Mousebreaker

Online Games

Eat Liver

Online Games

Gorilla Mask

Full Downloads

Norway Games

Damn Cool Pics

Kontraband

Extreme Humor

X Hollywood

I Dont Like You

123 Games

Hollywoodtuna

Funny Games

Cool Stuff

Viva La Games

X - Vids

Smit Happens

Funny Videos

Funny Stuff

ebaumsworld



Back to Listing

Lynn Jenkins (R) [Pic]

Hits: 10282 | Rating: (2.3) | Category: News & Politics | Added by: elkingo
Page: 1 24 5 Next >   Jump to: Bottom    Last Post
HumanAction
Male, 18-29, Midwest US
 2353 Posts
Thursday, October 10, 2013 9:49:28 AM
@Musuko

Couldn't later, more slowly, more carefully, with fewer casualties, be a better option?

Well, I suppose you could label me an Austrian in that regard.

When the government interferes with the market in any way (whether good or bad), the market becomes distorted from its natural state. The longer and more aggressive the interference, the greater the distortion.

Unfortunately, when a market is distorted, it "tries/wants" to go back to its natural state. At this point, the government can continue to hold it at the distorted state indefinitely, or, it will correct.

In my opinion, the government caused the recession; I can argue that further for anyone who wishes. Now, they're stagnating the recession. The best thing they can do is to let the bottom drop out, get out of the way, and let the market recover naturally.

Of course, that's just my opinion.

Musuko42
Male, 18-29, Europe
 2833 Posts
Thursday, October 10, 2013 9:45:14 AM
@Squrlz4Sale

Why on earth is one person even able to block votes like that?

HumanAction
Male, 18-29, Midwest US
 2353 Posts
Thursday, October 10, 2013 9:42:53 AM
@Squrlz

Oh, c'mon - don't be so one-sided. You know very well that Reid is blocking bills in the Senate from coming to a vote as well.

Here, read through some of the Bills Boehner has allowed the vote on and Reid has blocked: Speaker.gov.

These bills all allow temporary funding for various aspects of the government and DO NOT MENTION OBAMACARE. Reid, and the Senate, are blocking them.

A bill passed on the 8th 420-0 (All the Dems in the House voted for it) called the Federal Worker Pay Fairness Act; it would ensure that those federal employees still working will be paid on-time.

The Senate blocked it. What other reason could there be to block such a bill than to make the American people "hurt" more? They are punishing us and then blaming it on the Republicans; that's messed up.

Squrlz4Sale
Male, 40-49, Eastern US
 6018 Posts
Thursday, October 10, 2013 9:27:30 AM
@ HumanAction & Musuko:

I think you are both lacking an understanding of a key point in all this: The Senate has passed a bill to keep the government open, the "continuing resolution." That bill, if voted on RIGHT NOW by the House, would PASS and our government would be funded--even with the Tea Partiers elected in 2010.

Why hasn't the House been able to vote on that bill and AVOID this entire mess? Because of one person: John Boehner. You see, there aren't enough Tea Partiers in the House to prevent a "clean" (i.e., non-extortionist) CR from passing. But there ARE enough Tea Partiers within the ranks of the Republicans, however, to prevent John Boehner from holding onto his speakership if he offends them.

If you still don't understand the above, please read it again. It's central to the whole discussion.

Musuko42
Male, 18-29, Europe
 2833 Posts
Thursday, October 10, 2013 9:18:58 AM
@HumanAction

Yup, that was my question.

"In my opinion, the sooner the better; it will hurt more the longer we wait."

Couldn't later, more slowly, more carefully, with fewer casualties, be a better option?

After all, there's no real rush: nobody's coming knocking for America to pay back the debt, and you're in no danger of being unable to pay it back (self-inflicted defaults aside).

"I don't think Republicans really had a choice. What other recourse was there to stop a bill they never wanted?"

Frankly, I don't know. If I did, I would probably try to be a politician.

I could be an idealist and say that they should attempt to rationally discuss and debate and persuade the opposing side to come around to their views. But then it would be quite rightly pointed out to me that this can't happen if the other side is refusing to negotiate.

So...I genuinely don't know.

HumanAction
Male, 18-29, Midwest US
 2353 Posts
Thursday, October 10, 2013 9:13:35 AM
@Fools

I think the question was regarding how the Tea Party, which was unable to prevent the passing of ACA in March 2010, is now able to prevent the funding of it.

In this case, the overwhelming Tea Party victory in late 2010 is the reason. Yes, they lost some power in 2012; however, they gained far more in 2010 than they lost in 2012.

FoolsPrussia
Male, 30-39, Western US
 3398 Posts
Thursday, October 10, 2013 9:06:52 AM
"Ah, so they gained additional power in the meantime? That makes sense."

No. The Tea Party came to power in the 2010 midterm elections. They actually lost ground in the 2012 elections.

The Republicans lost seats in the Senate and the House in 2012, thought they still hold a House majority.

HumanAction
Male, 18-29, Midwest US
 2353 Posts
Thursday, October 10, 2013 8:51:30 AM
@Musuko

Isn't there a bit of a time lag for the effects to be felt?

That's a valid point. I don't suspect there will be a big market reaction either way, but I suppose it would take some amount of time to materialize.

But is right now, during a shaky recession, really the best time for this battle?

Well the market is going to correct at some point - that's inevitable. I don't think there's every going to be a "good" time for a correction. In my opinion, the sooner the better; it will hurt more the longer we wait.

Does one side's shady dealings justify the other side being shady, though?

Probably not, but, I don't think Republicans really had a choice. What other recourse was there to stop a bill they never wanted? Democrats refused to listen to, or negotiate with, Republicans on this from the start.

Squrlz4Sale
Male, 40-49, Eastern US
 6018 Posts
Thursday, October 10, 2013 8:45:16 AM
@ Elkingo:

Maybe you should re-read his comment... he didn't make the claim that the ACA was a "bill."

Au contraire, he did:

"The CR isn't a bill? Pass the clean "BILL" they say? ACA is part of the CR...." He was responding to my statement to HumanAction that the ACA is a law and not a bill. Robb79's erroneous understanding was that because the ACA is "part of" the CR, it is also, like the CR itself, a bill.

Musuko42
Male, 18-29, Europe
 2833 Posts
Thursday, October 10, 2013 8:40:38 AM
@HumanAction

Does one side's shady dealings justify the other side being shady, though?

Neither side seems to have done anything illegal, from what I've been hearing here. But both have been "shady".

Is this really a case of both sides pointing at the other and yelling "But he started it"?

Musuko42
Male, 18-29, Europe
 2833 Posts
Thursday, October 10, 2013 8:38:47 AM
@5Cats

"@Musuko42: I don't care what trolls say, really. I don't see why I should."

Sorry 5Cats, I'm not sure what comment of mine you're responding to there. Can you clarify?

@elkingo

"Elections."

Ah, so they gained additional power in the meantime? That makes sense.

@HumanAction

"However, the economy didn't even blink when 800,000 people didn't show up to work."

Isn't there a bit of a time lag for the effects to be felt?

"If anything, taking the stand now and accepting that we cannot continue to spend more than we earn, is the moral decision."

But is right now, during a shaky recession, really the best time for this battle?

HumanAction
Male, 18-29, Midwest US
 2353 Posts
Thursday, October 10, 2013 8:37:39 AM
@Musuko

Did something change?

Yes; when the law was passed, the House majority were Democrats. Now, it is Republicans.

Most people don't really understand how shady the ACA's passing was.

First off, all funding MUST originate from the House. The Senate knew this, so tied ACA onto an unrelated bill called the Service Members Home Ownership Tax Act which had passed the House unanimously.

Once it came back to the House in 2010, not a single Republican voted for it. 34 Democrats even voted against it. Nonetheless, it passed in March 2010 219-212.

The election later that year resulted in a resounding win by Republicans with the House majority suddenly shifting to them. Since then, and before then, Republicans have been against the ACA.

They rammed ACA through because they were afraid of losing the 2010 election and knew that Republicans would never support it.

elkingo
Male, 30-39, Eastern US
 3348 Posts
Thursday, October 10, 2013 8:20:05 AM
"how did the Tea Party, which I've heard is a minority part of the Republicans, manage to muster the majority needed to stop the budget?"

Elections.

5Cats
Male, 50-59, Canada
 24880 Posts
Thursday, October 10, 2013 8:19:36 AM
"@5Cats - It takes all of 2 seconds for me to load a breechloading double barrel shotgun."

@WhoDat: During which time the criminals will just sit around? It's STUPID ADVICE ok? Shooting shotguns into the air until they're empty if you THINK criminals are threatening you? Seriously?
Y R U So grumpy lately?

@Musuko42: I don't care what trolls say, really. I don't see why I should.

"Except President Obama didn't create PPACA...he just signed the bill."

@McThstlpnts & @Squrlz4: Seriously? He CAMPAIGNED on it! He HELPED WRITE IT! It's HIS SIGNATURE PIECE of legislation! By his own words, not some "vast right wing conspiracy" OK?


Link To An Overview Of ACA's history

elkingo
Male, 30-39, Eastern US
 3348 Posts
Thursday, October 10, 2013 8:18:19 AM
"Say you bargain over a drink. You agree on the conditions under which it will be sold and you agree to buy it.

Then yo refuse to pay. This is, if not illegal, the act of an azzhole."

If we agree that I am going to buy a coffee, and you change how that coffee is made 19 times, thus changing the price, you're the azzhole if you still expect me to pay for it.

HumanAction
Male, 18-29, Midwest US
 2353 Posts
Thursday, October 10, 2013 8:17:39 AM
@Musuko

It's surely having some pretty unpleasant repurcussions for many.

Yes, I agree. My brother works for Border Patrol. He is not being paid for the work he is doing right now.

Unfortunately, we have to look at this objectively. Yes, it sucks that people are out of work. However, the economy didn't even blink when 800,000 people didn't show up to work. That probably means that the jobs weren't all that important to begin with. I know that sounds mean, cold-hearted, and whatnot, but it's reality.

If any other employer makes bad decisions, spends more than they earn, hires more people than they can pay, and indebts themselves, we all accept that they should go out of business. We all know that some people will lose their jobs because of it.

I can't find a reason to look at this differently.

elkingo
Male, 30-39, Eastern US
 3348 Posts
Thursday, October 10, 2013 8:16:55 AM
"@ Robb79: Pardon me for just a second. ~Squrlz slams his head into his desk in exasperation~"

@S4S -- maybe you should re-read his comment.. he didn't make the claim that the ACA was a "bill".

HumanAction
Male, 18-29, Midwest US
 2353 Posts
Thursday, October 10, 2013 8:14:06 AM
@Musuko

That's a pretty scary prospect to be facing, surely.

Sure, but it's inevitable one way or the other; the only difference being that either we, our children, or our grandchildren will have to fight this fight.

If we continue to raise the debt limit, interest rates will grow. Eventually, if this is allowed to continue indefinitely, we necessarily will surpass our ability to collect enough taxes to pay even the interest. Therefore, we must conclude that we will eventually be forced to not raise the debt limit.

Why should we, who directly benefit from the debt ceiling being raised, push that dilemma onto some future generation? If anything, taking the stand now and accepting that we cannot continue to spend more than we earn, is the moral decision.

Musuko42
Male, 18-29, Europe
 2833 Posts
Thursday, October 10, 2013 8:13:26 AM
@HumanAction

"For those who want a balanced budget and those things that come with it, then no, this is in good spirit."

But this is what gets me: why were they unable to prevent it when the healthcare bill/act/law/thing went through the first time, and why do they have the power to do it now?

Did something change?

Musuko42
Male, 18-29, Europe
 2833 Posts
Thursday, October 10, 2013 8:12:01 AM
@HumanAction

I know it's not a full shutdown, but I've been seeing some hints of some of the filter downs: companies supplying equipment to your military facing the need to furlough thousands of workers because they can't deliver their completed equipment without the inspectors, who are furloughed, to inspect and pass them.

And so many workers having to go without pay. Yes, they'll get it back. But can all of us safely say we'd be okay if our normal pay got delayed indefinitely?

It's surely having some pretty unpleasant repurcussions for many.

HumanAction
Male, 18-29, Midwest US
 2353 Posts
Thursday, October 10, 2013 8:08:09 AM
@musuko

isn't is still somewhat against the spirit?

I suppose that's really a matter of ones own perspective. For those who want the debt ceiling raised, spending expanded, and Obamacare implemented, yes - this is against the spirit. For those who want a balanced budget and those things that come with it, then no, this is in good spirit.

The problem is that everyone is acting like opposing a law is some criminal act; it's not. If you don't like a law, you should do everything you can to repeal it or stop it. If there is a large enough majority who support the law, then there is nothing that can be done to stop it.

For example, Democrats really don't like the sequester - which is a law (like Obamacare); they have been actively trying to repeal it. If they could set the budget, they would do away with it. I don't distinguish that as any different than this situation.

Musuko42
Male, 18-29, Europe
 2833 Posts
Thursday, October 10, 2013 8:06:57 AM
@HumanAction

"It is absolutely within Obama's power to refuse to negotiate. According to polls, there is still more disdain for House Republicans than for Obama. I think they are all at fault."

We're on the same page there, then.

"Unless Obamacare is a bad law, whiand I believe it is. In that case, the system is working beautifully."

But is the potential damage of wrecking the US's credit rating, disrupting so much of the working of your country, and *really* annoying a lot of tourists who came a long way to see closed attractions a price worth paying for this particular fight?

"It's being blown WAY out of proportion."

Everything I've heard seems to be along the lines of "we don't know what will happen" if the limit is passed.

That's a pretty scary prospect to be facing, surely.

Musuko42
Male, 18-29, Europe
 2833 Posts
Thursday, October 10, 2013 8:03:18 AM
@Squrlz4Sale

Thank you. :)

Weirdly, this particular debate's managed to have some cheerful moments.

HumanAction
Male, 18-29, Midwest US
 2353 Posts
Thursday, October 10, 2013 8:02:22 AM
@Musuko

Why is there so much spite against Obama if it's not?

It is absolutely within Obama's power to refuse to negotiate. According to polls, there is still more disdain for House Republicans than for Obama. I think they are all at fault.

doesn't this whole situation suggest the system is flawed?

Unless Obamacare is a bad law, whiand I believe it is. In that case, the system is working beautifully.

with the credit limit looming, it seems rather dangerous.

It's being blown WAY out of proportion. This country will not default, even if the debt limit isn't raised. The interest payments are but a fraction of the tax collected every month.

The fact of the matter is that the government isn't shutdown. Entitlement checks are flowing, the military is still attacking weaker nations, and the NSA is still reading our emails. This is a non-shutdown.

Musuko42
Male, 18-29, Europe
 2833 Posts
Thursday, October 10, 2013 7:51:24 AM
@masmas

That's exactly how it appears to me, from over here.

How did this even happen, anyway? What I mean is: how did the Tea Party, which I've heard is a minority part of the Republicans, manage to muster the majority needed to stop the budget?

Did a large number change their mind between the passing of the healthcare law previously, and the budget now?

Page: 1 24 5 Next > 

You Must be Signed in to Add a Comment

If you've already got an I-Am-Bored.com account,
click here to sign in.

If you don't have an account yet,
Click Here to Create a Free Account
 

Back to Listing ^top


Bored | Suggest a Link | Advertise | Contact I Am Bored | About I Am Bored | Link to I Am Bored | Live Submission | Privacy | TOS | Ad Choices | Copyright Policy |
© 2014 Demand Media, Inc. All rights reserved.