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English Vs English Vs English [Pic]

Hits: 10288 | Rating: (2.7) | Category: Funny | Added by: peppyprep
Jump to: Bottom    Last Post
pumba62
Male, 40-49, Canada
 972 Posts
Thursday, April 11, 2013 7:51:29 AM
In Canada we call it Timbit

ferdyfred
Male, 40-49, Europe
 11683 Posts
Thursday, April 11, 2013 1:51:34 AM
So wheres faucet come from then??

ferdyfred
Male, 40-49, Europe
 11683 Posts
Thursday, April 11, 2013 1:49:34 AM
MrPeabody
wrong
steven fry commented on this in his QI show
and he is always right !!!

davymid
Male, 30-39, Europe
 12085 Posts
Wednesday, April 10, 2013 10:30:32 PM
Who's on tenderhooks?

lauriloo
Female, 40-49, Midwest US
 1805 Posts
Wednesday, April 10, 2013 10:57:41 AM
I am from Minnesota and I was amazed that our next-door neighbors in Wisconsin call a drinking fountain a "bubbler". Made me uncomfortable at my job interview, amongst other uncomfortable things.

MrPeabody
Male, 30-39, Eastern US
 1795 Posts
Wednesday, April 10, 2013 10:44:05 AM
@ferdyfred

"tidbits was titbits
the US thought it was naughty
so tidbits came about"

No, this is another classic case of the British changing the usage and then trying to make others look stupid because they don't realize they were the ones who changed it.

The Oxford English Dictionary gives a first cite for "tidbit" as 1640; first for "titbit" was 1694. It's etymology section indicates that "tidbit" was in use first. "Tid" seems to have meant "delicate." Most likely "titbit" was created by folk etymology, changing "tid" to the more familiar "tit," meaning "small."

The source of the quotes are all British, so the idea of Americans changing it for prudish reasons is just ignorance.

McGovern1981
Male, 30-39, Eastern US
 13519 Posts
Wednesday, April 10, 2013 10:21:08 AM
Anyone that calls a windshield a windscreen should not be taken seriously.

IRockYeah
Male, 40-49, Europe
 2602 Posts
Wednesday, April 10, 2013 9:20:12 AM
UK - Pavement.
USA - Sidewalk.
UK - Boot.
USA - Trunk
UK - Invade.
USA - Liberate.

DromEd
Male, 40-49, Eastern US
 1590 Posts
Wednesday, April 10, 2013 5:33:01 AM
Funny soccer was 1890's British slang for "football" and we Americans catch crap for using it. Oh well.

ferdyfred
Male, 40-49, Europe
 11683 Posts
Wednesday, April 10, 2013 1:55:41 AM
We in the UK just call it ally now a days
I know, machine 3 ton a night of it

ferdyfred
Male, 40-49, Europe
 11683 Posts
Wednesday, April 10, 2013 1:52:44 AM
AL-YOU-MINI-UM
yup thats right
boot is the back of the car
tidbits was titbits
the US thought it was naughty
so tidbits came about
doesnt bother me such
love the different names for stuff
faucet - tap
where the feck did faucet come from??
cell phone - mobile
footpath - side walk
it goes on

MrPeabody
Male, 30-39, Eastern US
 1795 Posts
Tuesday, April 09, 2013 10:16:36 PM
So essentially the Brits allowed the Daily Mail to change the name from Aluminum to Aluminium, and laugh at anyone who calls it by the name the man who discovered it called it.

(they also did this with Soccer, and tidbits and act like everyone else is a moron when they were the ones who changed the words)

MrPeabody
Male, 30-39, Eastern US
 1795 Posts
Tuesday, April 09, 2013 10:10:13 PM
I had addressed the aluminum discrepancy in the GifvsJif post a while back.
Davy settled on aluminum by the time he published his 1812 book Chemical Philosophy: "This substance appears to contain a peculiar metal, but as yet Aluminum has not been obtained in a perfectly free state, though alloys of it with other metalline substances have been procured sufficiently distinct to indicate the probable nature of alumina." But the same year, an anonymous contributor to the Quarterly Review, a British political-literary journal, in a review of Davy's book, objected to aluminum and proposed the name aluminium, "for so we shall take the liberty of writing the word, in preference to aluminum, which has a less classical sound."

carmium
Female, 50-59, Canada
 6406 Posts
Tuesday, April 09, 2013 9:28:10 PM
Did you know "aluminum" was the original name? The discover named it to match up with elements like platinum and molybdenum. It was an English publisher (if I recall) who changed the name to one he simply liked better.
Just thot I'd throw that in.

whodat6484
Male, 30-39, Eastern US
 3726 Posts
Tuesday, April 09, 2013 5:10:42 PM
@one47master - Nope, sorry mate, in this country it's not pronounced that way, therefore he pronounced it incorrectly.

Aluminum (American)

Aluminium (British)

El_Chinche
Male, 18-29, Eastern US
 511 Posts
Tuesday, April 09, 2013 4:56:24 PM
Using american pronunciations of certain words is one of my favorite ways to piss of an english person. Right after calling football soccer and refusing to differentiate between the british isles.

@piperfawn
I think it's hilarious that you wrote that in broken english. (intentional or not)

QueenZira
Female, 18-29, Midwest US
 2181 Posts
Tuesday, April 09, 2013 4:56:24 PM
We made up our own American patois via the transitive power of South Park- "WE DO WHAT WE WANT!!" XD

But really we could be at this all day, a Boot is something you wear on your foot in bad weather, not someplace in the back of your car, and so on and so forth.

I wonder why Canada and Australia never get singled out like this, you know?

piperfawn
Male, 30-39, Europe
 3892 Posts
Tuesday, April 09, 2013 4:20:15 PM
Pfff...english and americans that fight about how to pronounce the word aluminium. The elements have latin names,both your pronounce are shat.

5Cats
Male, 50-59, Canada
 26203 Posts
Tuesday, April 09, 2013 4:05:57 PM
Canadian English:

Humour, eh?
'luminum, eh?
Butt, eh?
Driving
Y'all

Canoas
Male, 18-29, Europe
 429 Posts
Tuesday, April 09, 2013 4:04:44 PM
@whodat6484
but he was probably right as the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC) officially standardised on "aluminium" in 1990

one47master
Male, 18-29, Europe
 40 Posts
Tuesday, April 09, 2013 3:54:04 PM
@whodat6484

So he pronounced it correctly. Awesome.

whodat6484
Male, 30-39, Eastern US
 3726 Posts
Tuesday, April 09, 2013 3:27:07 PM
I had a Chemistry teacher in high school who pronounced the word aluminum AL-YOU-MINI-UM and it used to drive me f*cking crazy!

peppyprep
Female, 13-17, Midwest US
 266 Posts
Tuesday, April 09, 2013 3:04:49 PM
Link: English Vs English Vs English [Pic] [Rate Link] - I've seen a lot of that 'ultra English' right here on I-A-B.


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