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What's Gerrymandering? Gerrymandering Explained

Hits: 11610 | Rating: (2.8) | Category: News & Politics | Added by: MofMaW
Jump to: Bottom    Last Post
Vimto
Male, 40-49, Europe
 2593 Posts
Monday, July 18, 2011 5:47:12 AM
*cough* Proportional Representation *cough*

Angilion
Male, 40-49, Europe
 11547 Posts
Monday, July 18, 2011 3:10:16 AM
Voting reform is currently a bit of an issue in the UK, which is between Denmark and the USA in terms of size, voter turnout, etc. There was a marked drop in voter turnout in the 90s, down to under 60%. Recently there was a referendum on changing the traditional first past the post system to a different system. More than 2/3rds of the vote was in favour of keeping constituency-based first past the post. It's simple and it works fairly well. There are advantages and disadvantages to all systems of counting votes.

Angilion
Male, 40-49, Europe
 11547 Posts
Monday, July 18, 2011 3:00:18 AM
I've just looked at the voting system used in Denmark (and some other small democracies) and it doesn't look that different. You still have constituencies, from which ~80% of the seats are filled by simple counting of votes.

It's not such a dramatically different system that it can account for the big difference in voter turnout between Denmark and big democracies with a first past the post system based wholly on constituencies.

Maybe it's something to do with the number of voters. If there are 60 times as many voters, each vote has much less overall effect. The national government of a huge country of 300m people is inevitably less connected to people than that of a small country of 5m people.

Maybe switching to the more complicated voting of the Danish system would reduce the number of USA voters even more.

Izaq
Male, 30-39, Europe
 175 Posts
Monday, July 18, 2011 1:21:15 AM
And btw Danish elections usually have more than 90% of the people voting and you are automatically registered as a voter. In US it's below 50% no? Go figure...

Izaq
Male, 30-39, Europe
 175 Posts
Monday, July 18, 2011 1:19:57 AM
Continued:

This guarantees that:
- Every vote counts.
- Particularly popular politicians from all regions of Denmark can be elected for Parliament.
- New parties only need 3% of the votes to get seats.
- If you want to get into Parliament without being in a party you can. You "just" need how many votes it takes to get a seat in Parliament.

This guarantees fair elections since every vote counts. There is a variety of parties to vote for. New parties are formed when something important comes up that no party is interested in.

If both Democrats and Republicans try not to talk about a subject, who will you vote for to get something done about it? Does your Democratic vote even count if you live in a Republican range and vice versa?

Izaq
Male, 30-39, Europe
 175 Posts
Monday, July 18, 2011 1:14:50 AM
How about losing the stupid "range based" system?

The system allows completely skewed results and it disallows new parties from forming!

In Denmark the system is different. In each range the parties make lists of who represent in that range. The voters can then either vote for a particular politician or the party.

Votes are then counted. There are 179 seats in parliament (4 reserved for Greenland and the Faroe Islands). Then you know how many votes each seat represents. A party needs at least 3% of the votes to get seats in parliament.

The parties now fill the seats by "spending their votes" buying seats. If a particular politician has gotten enough votes by people voting for him/her personally, that person is guaranteed a seat. This means that if a politician from a part of Denmark is particularly popular that person will be seated in Parliament.

penguinazul
Female, 18-29, Southern US
 472 Posts
Sunday, July 17, 2011 9:57:42 PM
Did anyone else think that this had to do with Gerry1of1 (I think that's his/your username, Gerry! Lol)

Angilion
Male, 40-49, Europe
 11547 Posts
Sunday, July 17, 2011 10:33:59 AM
Addition to that last post:

They didn't fluke a good dictator. They murdered the previous one and picked a good one very deliberately.

Angilion
Male, 40-49, Europe
 11547 Posts
Sunday, July 17, 2011 10:32:04 AM
The solution? Fluke a good dictator and hope he picks good successors. Best way really.


It might be on paper, but it isn't sustainable in practice.

It was tried in the Roman empire and it resulted in the golden years known as the time of the five good emperors, but it's a rare person who can wield the power of dictatorship effectively and benevolently and when it goes bad it goes very bad. The next emperor after the five good ones was Commodus, who was not someone you'd want in charge of anything.

5Cats
Male, 50-59, Canada
 25847 Posts
Sunday, July 17, 2011 9:49:30 AM
As soon as business cat showed up (0:33) I started LOLing and couldn't stop!

Plus it's 100% true, wasn't the "Top 25 Worst Gerrymanders" on IAB before?

HERE are some examples

kazai710
Female, 18-29, Eastern US
 14 Posts
Saturday, July 16, 2011 10:55:09 PM
hehe... I am sending this to my gov. teacher...

redspade
Male, 13-17, Canada
 150 Posts
Saturday, July 16, 2011 9:35:45 PM
i saw minecraft pig

swaffire
Male, 18-29, Eastern US
 67 Posts
Saturday, July 16, 2011 8:01:54 PM
i just got learned

Klamz
Male, 18-29, Eastern US
 693 Posts
Saturday, July 16, 2011 7:22:49 PM
I second the vote.

lemmingboy15
Male, 18-29, Southern US
 642 Posts
Saturday, July 16, 2011 4:56:28 PM
why wasn't government this entertaining in high school?
i vote all school lessons be taught with jungle creatures.

TopperHey
Male, 18-29, Europe
 1945 Posts
Saturday, July 16, 2011 4:31:51 PM
2 Fundamental problems with democracy:

1) "People" are stupid and selfish (generally)
2) You have to please stupid and selfish people in order to get elected (tantamount to bribery).

The solution? Fluke a good dictator and hope he picks good successors. Best way really.

CrakrJak
Male, 40-49, Midwest US
 17243 Posts
Saturday, July 16, 2011 4:23:26 PM
Good explanation, My state is so screwed over with gerrymandering it's pathetic, and it's all because of the crooks in Chicago running the whole state like they own it.

Fatninja01
Male, 18-29, Australia
 24660 Posts
Saturday, July 16, 2011 1:59:44 PM
Sooo looooooonnnngggg

Pooptart19
Male, 18-29, Southern US
 2290 Posts
Saturday, July 16, 2011 12:58:00 PM
Telling what Gerrymandering is without explaining the origin of the term itself? tsk tsk

Prownilo
Male, 18-29, Europe
 17 Posts
Saturday, July 16, 2011 12:28:42 PM
Despite having very little interest in politics, i found myself watching all of his videos.

xCYBERDYNEx
Male, 18-29, Southern US
 4799 Posts
Saturday, July 16, 2011 12:06:46 PM
this video sucks

MofMaW
Male, 30-39, Europe
 0 Posts
Wednesday, July 13, 2011 11:43:31 AM
Link: What's Gerrymandering? Gerrymandering Explained [Rate Link] - Everything you don't want to know about politics.


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