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10 Amazing Facts You've Been Told, That Are Wrong

Hits: 42384 | Rating: (2.8) | Category: Science | Added by: CrakrJak
Page: 1 2 Next >   Jump to: Bottom    Last Post
bigbangbilly
Male, 13-17, Eastern US
 705 Posts
Saturday, April 17, 2010 8:20:50 AM
great

Lionhart2
Male, 40-49, Australia
 8285 Posts
Wednesday, March 31, 2010 5:06:24 PM
> sbeelz
> I intend to advertise the brand-new Mustang GT500 for $50,000, but a misprint causes it to be advertised for $5,000

Firstly, in the old days you'd have 'E&OE' in small print (Errors & Omissions Excepted); nowadays you don't need it because most courts hold that it still applies, whether printed on the article or not.

Secondly, if someone DID insist you sell at that price, you could hold the newspaper responsible for the shortfall caused by their error; even if you proofread the ad, the courts accept that You are not a professional proofreader and you missing the mistake when you looked at the ad was 'acceptable ignorance', whereas the paper has a responsibility to accurately convey the intention of your original copy.

And even if you wrote it wrong on the original copy, the law requires 'reasonable intent', so whatever you wrote, if it wasn't your intention to sell at that price, you have an 'out'.

sbeelz
Male, 30-39, Western US
 2869 Posts
Wednesday, March 31, 2010 9:17:25 AM
Incidentally, I saw an undercover report a few years ago where a reporter shopped at multiple Target, Walmart and Kmart stores in different parts of the US with a hidden camera. They found that Walmart systematically "forgot" to update prices of items to match advertised sale prices- while Target and Kmart only occasionally did so. All three stores would knock the price down to the one advertised when the reporter brought it to the attention of the clerk- but it happened so frequently at Walmart that one can only come to the conclusion that the "mistakes" were intentional- management counting on a duping customers who either didn't notice the bait and switch, or who are too timid to say anything. Don't know if that's still going on, but then again I don't really care. I hardly ever set foot in Walmart.

sbeelz
Male, 30-39, Western US
 2869 Posts
Wednesday, March 31, 2010 9:17:05 AM
"An advertised price is a written contractual offer to the world at large to provide for offered price (Sale of Goods Act 1895 with 1923 Amendments [AU]). If a shop fails to honor it, they are liable to be sued for the difference in price."

I'm skeptical. Say I own a Ford dealership and I intend to advertise the brand-new Mustang GT500 for $50,000, but a misprint causes it to be advertised for $5,000. Am I now contractually bound to sell at that price, despite the fact that I'll lose my shirt in the deal? It seems to me that you could really only successfully sue if you could demonstrate that a merchant intentionally ran ads with misleading prices.

daniellee_x
Female, 18-29, Midwest US
 459 Posts
Wednesday, March 31, 2010 7:39:09 AM
gold leaf is not the same as paper, on myth busters they tried to fold a huge piece of paper more than 7 times and it didn't work.

Lionhart2
Male, 40-49, Australia
 8285 Posts
Wednesday, March 31, 2010 1:46:37 AM
(cont)

The problem, of course, is that a contract only exists when the 5 Points are met:
1. offer and acceptance (agreement)
2. consideration (payment)
3. an intention to create legal relations
4. legal capacity
5. formalities

Where a shop refuses to honour an advertised price, the contract has failed in the second step, because they won't accept consideration at the rate you are offering (their original advertised price). Since no goods have been exchanged, it is easy to prove breach of contract but difficult to put a compensatory value to it, since you haven't lost anything.

Lionhart2
Male, 40-49, Australia
 8285 Posts
Wednesday, March 31, 2010 1:46:25 AM
> Angilion

I can't argue with you because your name has 'Lion' in it, therefore everything you say is canon. However, we're talking civil law here, not criminal. An advertised price is a written contractual offer to the world at large to provide for offered price (Sale of Goods Act 1895 with 1923 Amendments [AU]). If a shop fails to honor it, they are liable to be sued for the difference in price.

Of course, since it is civil law, the cost of action is on the plaintiff, and the difference is usually a fraction of the price of legal action, so in practical terms, nothing is usually done .

Your argument is best exampled by Carlill v. Carbolic Smoke Ball Company, wherein the defendant argued that the ad was not to be taken seriously re the promises it made. The court held, and has consistently held in similar cases, that a 'reasonable man' would consider a serious offer has been made.

Angilion
Male, 40-49, Europe
 11640 Posts
Wednesday, March 31, 2010 12:03:01 AM
How did the great wall thing get started, anyway? It's long, but narrow. Obviously it can't be seen from very far away - it's too narrow. The last human-built thing you could see as you travel away from Earth would probably be a city.

Angilion
Male, 40-49, Europe
 11640 Posts
Tuesday, March 30, 2010 11:59:48 PM
Lionhart2:

I decided to check Australian law. Unsurprisingly, it's based on the same concept as in English common law. Which means that the display of a price does *not* constitute an offer of contract. It is, like in so many places, an invitation to treat *and is not legally binding*.

An Australian government website on the subject, so it's probably right about Australian law. I had to break the URL to fit IAB restrictions, just remove the spaces.

http://www.accc.gov.au/content/ index.phtml/itemId/322984

An ‘invitation to treat’ is a contract law concept that means displaying an item with a marked price does not constitute a binding offer to the world at large; rather, it constitutes an 'invitation to treat', or an offer to deal with the trader concerning the item and as such the retailer has the option to withdraw the item from sale.

Lionhart2
Male, 40-49, Australia
 8285 Posts
Tuesday, March 30, 2010 11:17:15 PM
> DaintyMod

Haha my poor grammar. What I MEANT was "...the legend says 'from the moon', not space, and it says that Armstrong stated..."

Obviously he never DID say it, or it would be all over the internet and in official NASA logs etc. Mind you, the internet is full of stuff about Armstrong saying there were UFO's and alien bases on the far side of the moon, too, so

I'm not sure... I'm beginning to get an inkling of a doubt of a feeling of a thought that you might not be able to completely trust and rely on the accuracy of this internet thing...

davymid
Male, 30-39, Europe
 12085 Posts
Tuesday, March 30, 2010 10:39:15 PM
1. Yes, this IS wrong on many levels, starting with the fact that the legend says "from the moon", not space. Armstrong stated that he could see "a dark irregular crack" which was soon identified as the SHADOW of the Great Wall, late in the evening when it was quite long.

Neil Armstrong saw the sunset shadow of the Great Wall of China on the f*cking moon? Lionhart, have you been listening to weird websites again? The kind that tell you the earth is 6000 years old?

Kanashto
Male, 18-29, Asia
 501 Posts
Tuesday, March 30, 2010 9:02:06 PM
10 peenuts, wrong spelling

CoffeeDiiva
Female, 40-49, Eastern US
 1615 Posts
Tuesday, March 30, 2010 6:16:25 PM
some of those I knew some I didn't and I never heard the dust buster/nasa thing
working in retail before I knew about the whole advertised price thing, Have had people try it with me, and most stores will just give it to them for the price that was advertised as long as it isn't a lot of money.

As for the folding paper thing, I think folding a piece of gold leaf is very different than regular paper, it is much thinner.

Lionhart2
Male, 40-49, Australia
 8285 Posts
Tuesday, March 30, 2010 5:55:47 PM
4. Duuuh.

3. Polar bears cover their face with their hands when fishing in one of those holes in the ice, so that the fish can't see their black bits when all the rest of them is white. How do they know their faces are black!?

2. Typical manipulation of statistical bias. It costs a fortune to get a McD's franchise. No-one is going to spend a fortune on a store that will be bombed out of existence. So you set up in a safe country. The no-war-with-McD's is an Effect, not a Cause.

1. Yes, this IS wrong on many levels, starting with the fact that the legend says "from the moon", not space. Armstrong stated that he could see "a dark irregular crack" which was soon identified as the SHADOW of the Great Wall, late in the evening when it was quite long.

Lionhart2
Male, 40-49, Australia
 8285 Posts
Tuesday, March 30, 2010 5:47:26 PM
10. Comes about because to lots of people, like me, peanuts and urine smell exactly the same.

9. Despite all the safety systems, the key here is a sealed tube with a plug-like object in it. That air cushion keeps it a gentle freefall even in the worst case scenario.

8. Yes, it can be done, if you use super-thin paper or wads of pressure, like a steamroller. The myth is 'an ordinary bit of paper" and 'by hand', so none of those proved exceptions count.

7. hippopotami! Greek derivative, not latin!

6. The problem with the doggie math thing is that it means they reach puberty at 3.5 human years old.

5. Total bullpoo. An advertised price is not an 'invitation to bargain', it is a WRITTEN offer to enter into a contract to buy, with the TERMS of that contract stated in the offer. Failure to fulfill the contract by providing the goods at the contracted price is a definite Breach of Contract and legally recoverable.

kiiro_kitsun
Female, 18-29, Midwest US
 33 Posts
Tuesday, March 30, 2010 5:40:33 PM
*one

kiiro_kitsun
Female, 18-29, Midwest US
 33 Posts
Tuesday, March 30, 2010 5:40:11 PM
1. I think the price on is referring, not to their ads, but to the price tag in the store, because I have heard of people trying to switch the price stickers to get items cheaper and being refused.

2. What kind of dog is that?! Is that lady just tiny, or is the dog huge? Anyone know?

skine
Male, 18-29, Eastern US
 724 Posts
Tuesday, March 30, 2010 3:41:41 PM
The paper folding one:

-I bet you can't fold a standard sheet of notebook paper more than seven times!

Well, then I'll just pull out my special notebook of folding paper! In fact, my paper is so special that it's made of gold!

-...but that's not a standard sheet of notebook paper...

Angilion
Male, 40-49, Europe
 11640 Posts
Tuesday, March 30, 2010 3:09:21 PM
Oddly I don't agree with the dog one, it's not comparing life expectancy so much as learning curve. A dog learns in 1 year what a human learns in 7, relatively.


Which would mean that a dog could qualify as a doctor in 1 year :)

It's just made up stuff. A year is a year. Most animals initially develop much faster than humans (e.g. many can walk within hours), but that's because humans are born far less developed (or we'd be extinct because childbirth would be impossible).

Angilion
Male, 40-49, Europe
 11640 Posts
Tuesday, March 30, 2010 3:01:40 PM
The shop one is wrong. The price on an item infers an "implied contract" to sell the item to the buyer at that price. Whatever the cashier tells you. You get that item at that incorrect price goddammit! :)


Maybe the law is different in your country, but here in the UK a price not only doesn't constitute an offer of contract to sell at that price, it doesn't even legally constitute an offer to sell the item at all, at any price.

This was tested in the past when a shopkeeper was prosecuted for having an illegal item (a bladed weapon of some kind, if I recall correctly) on display with a price label. He was found not guilty on exactly that basis.

In English common law (which is the basis for the law in many parts of the world), stating a price indicates "an invitation to treat" and carries no contractual obligations at all.

Zghost
Male, 13-17, Eastern US
 165 Posts
Tuesday, March 30, 2010 2:32:43 PM
That paper thing is a misunderstanding. The myth is that you can't fold an ordinary sheet of paper in half more than 7 times. It doesn't apply to thinner or thicker sheets, or different types of paper altogether.

littlepete50
Male, 18-29, Europe
 1364 Posts
Tuesday, March 30, 2010 2:23:28 PM
The shop one is wrong. The price on an item infers an "implied contract" to sell the item to the buyer at that price. Whatever the cashier tells you. You get that item at that incorrect price goddammit! :)

CrakrJak
Male, 40-49, Midwest US
 17299 Posts
Tuesday, March 30, 2010 2:18:43 PM
deeplick: after doing a little digging, It seems the 'offer to bargain' rule does apply. Why ? Because of yard sales, flea markets, and auctions.
Most national chains will discount a legitimately mismarked item, However there are dishonest people with their own price guns out there that try to sneakily make their own discount and stores aren't compelled to discount any item where the tag looks 'fishy'.

CrakrJak
Male, 40-49, Midwest US
 17299 Posts
Tuesday, March 30, 2010 2:11:26 PM
madest: Using Firefox with Adblock Plus means no annoying ads, Try it.

LazyMe484
Male, 18-29, Canada
 10503 Posts
Tuesday, March 30, 2010 1:42:58 PM
A lot of these have mistakes and/or are outdated.

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