I Am Bored

Loads of viral videos, games, memes, lists and social networking for when you're bored. Updated every day, so visit often.
Latest Popular Most Bookmarked Most Emailed Top Rated My Favorites Random Chat
All Games Funny Entertainment Quizzes Weird Tech Lifestyle, Arts & Lit. News & Politics Science Sports Misc
T-Shirts   Submit Content  

Visualizing The Fourth Spatial Dimension

This is a 4-dimensional analog of a 3-dimensional square--a tesseract--projected from the 4th to the 3rd dimension.

submitted by: MacGuffin
< Back Next >
Visualizing The Fourth Spatial Dimension. This is a 4-dimensional analog of a 3-dimensional square--a tesseract--projected from the 4th to the 3rd dimension.
+ Add to Favs
View/Add
Hits: 7626 | Favorites: 1 | Emailed: 0 | Rating: 2.4 | Category: Science | Date: 07/05/2012
 
 popular today
Have Girlfriend Will Travel [Pic] Is that a ToyoT&A?
50 Incredible Shots You May Not Have Seen Yet[Pix] Literally the only time I have ever been impressed.
Lipstick In School [Pic] There are teachers and then there are educators.
We Need To Talk About This Picture [Pic] With those it`s not called motor boating, it`s called cruise shipping.
An Example Of Well Done Code [Pic] All HTML should look this good.
More Comments >

itzazoom
Male, 18-29, Europe
 182 Posts
Wednesday, July 18, 2012 3:24:33 PM
visualize a video of a normal rotating cube. We "know" that we are seeing a the projection of a rotation cube, but consider it from a purely 2d standpoint and conencting edges are stretching and twisting inexplicably.
this is the same thing a dimension higher. if you knew 4d as normal, those edges would all be fixed length and its just a rotating shape.
but its interesting because of the two "cubes" with connected edges and the whole multiple axees of rotation thing...

MacGuffin
Female, 30-39, Europe
 2597 Posts
Saturday, July 7, 2012 7:50:38 AM
I can't wrap my head around this >_<


Don`t worry, that just means you`re normal. ;)

MacGuffin
Female, 30-39, Europe
 2597 Posts
Saturday, July 7, 2012 7:47:53 AM

The real headspin comes when you appreciate how differently a 4-dimensional being would be able to see those same 3D objects that surround us, as well as a 4D object like the tesseract in this video. They'd see in true 3D, and would consequently be able to see all six sides of the 3D cubes that make up each `surface` of the tesseract simultaneously. They`d also be able to see inside each constituent cube at the same time. This is analogous to how we can easily see all four sides of a 2D square and its interior too, because we`re looking at that 2D object in its entirety from the enhanced perspective of a third dimension. A 2D being would by contrast be able to see at most two sides of a square at a single time, with the interior of it hidden from them completely.

MacGuffin
Female, 30-39, Europe
 2597 Posts
Saturday, July 7, 2012 7:47:41 AM

We see in 2D, because we can only ever see one two-dimensional 'window` of the 3D objects that surround us at any one time. We just extrapolate from the fact that we can see different sides of objects with consistently-predictable features that we`re seeing a single two-dimensional aspect of each three-dimensional object at a time as we move through the spacetime we and those 3D objects share.

...

MacGuffin
Female, 30-39, Europe
 2597 Posts
Saturday, July 7, 2012 7:47:33 AM
Simulating a tesseract in 3D isn't all that hard; as has been noted, it`s analogous to drawing a cube on paper. The problem is that making a video of it forces the image down to TWO dimensions, resulting in a figure that makes no sense whatsoever.


You`re right of course. This video, as with everything seen by the human eye, is really two-dimensional (it`s projected onto a flat computer screen). It has 3-dimensional cues that help us to understand implied depth, but in reality it`s completely flat. However, the thing to realise is, the world as we perceive it is *always* 2-dimensional, even though we intuitively understand what we see around us to be 3-dimensional space, and even though binocular eyes have certain amount of `depth perception` out to about 30 feet.

...

More Comments >
 


Bored | Suggest a Link | Contact I Am Bored | About I Am Bored | Link to I Am Bored | Live Submission | Privacy | TOS | Ad Choices | Copyright Policy |
© 2014 Demand Media, Inc. All rights reserved.