Christopher Hitchens Investigates Mother Theresa And Asks If Her Saintly Reputation Is Deserved

Submitted by: LordJim 2 months ago in Misc


During her lifetime Mother Teresa had become synonymous with saintliness. But in 1994, three years before her death, journalist Christopher Hitchens made this provocative film asking if her reputation was deserved.
There are 38 comments:
Female 8,403
the woman was a sadist.
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Male 11,563
On a side note:  


China's persecution of Christians at highest level since Mao

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Male 43,818
Nobody's perfect
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Female 5,096
thanks, I just watched all of that thing, plus some others. Seems the whole thing reeks, but that hardly surprises me, everything connected to the Catholic Church reeks.


Here's a joke. A catholic priest, a rapist and a pedophile walk into a bar, he orders a drink.
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Male 2,469
This is not the first story that was critical of her. 
  I wish I could find an article that I read around the time of her death that was very critical of her and her methods not only in her work but how she used her money (donations). This particular article made it clear that she withheld moneys to her other charities in order to keep the appearance of poverty which was her bread and butter.
   The story actually quoted a close associate at the time who stated that Teresa said that her self.
  The Catholic church canonized her in an effort to help there image during hard accusations of pedophile priests  and lowering attendance. She was just the flavor of the Month.
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Male 11,563
Its a pretty desperate attempt to attack someone's 'reputation', and an old lady no less, all for pride.  Did he do more good in God's eyes?  Only God can say, but reputation among men and women is irrelevant in the eyes of God, because He sees beyond that and weighs the heart and mind.  
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Male 1,124
monkwarrior if her reputation among men is irrelevant, why are you stating your support for her? Are you God?
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Male 11,563
bearbear01 i'm simply pointing out the desperate attack of the presenter.
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Male 1,124
monkwarrior mine was a "why" question, not a "what" question. You are only doubling down on contradicting yourself. If her reputation among men is irrelevant, why are you pointing at 'desperate attacks'? Are you God?
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Male 11,563
bearbear01 Your question showed you missed the point completely, i simply clarified it for you. It seems though, you want to continue missing the point, but coming from you that's no surprise to me at all.
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Male 1,124
monkwarrior I'll give you this: you are true to form. That form may be a mutilated, deformed intellectuality with non existent logic and enough stupidity to be callous to moral shame. But boy, you are true to that form. Deformed as it may be.
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Male 11,563
bearbear01 the deformity is your own.
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Male 8,261
monkwarrior I wonder if it would make a difference to your opinion if you knew she wrote in a letter ( published after her death ) that she had long since lost all belief in God but maintained the pretence to shore up the edifice. She was latterly an atheist loyal only to the institution of the Catholic Church. 
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Male 739
LordJim "Jesus has a very special love for you. As for me, the silence and the emptiness is so great that I look and do not see, listen and do not hear."
— Mother Teresa to the Rev. Michael Van Der Peet, September 1979

Not the words of an atheist
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Male 11,563
LordJim no, it's still a desperate attempt.  and reputation among men and woman is still irrelevant in the eyes of God.
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Male 8,261
monkwarrior I'd like to propose a thought experiment,  if you are interested;

A  child is born and  gradually becomes aware that is  different,  he has no empathy and is incapable of love but he consciously and cynically decides that being perceived as " good " is his best interests.

He starts early,  attentive to his elderly neighbour's  needs ( getting their shopping in, walking their dogs in inclement weather . etc. ) At school he is popular - an attentive and intelligent student supportive of the less able,  a keen team player who insists that fair play is more important than winning ,  the sort of captain who,  if he claps a newbie on the shoulder and says " Well played,  young 'un"  that kid will be walking on air. If he sees bullying he quietly but firmly intervenes, his admiring schoolmates emulate him and within months bullying is a thing of the past. He leaves the school a better place than he found it.

But  he doesn't care,  it was all an act to build up his reputation.

He  goes into business and,  for purely cynical reasons,  is meticulously honest and ethical;  he prospers and expands.  His staff consider him to be the best boss ever.

He attends a liberal church but never talks about God ( in whom he has no belief ) but rather works quietly in the background for the charitable side and brings something nice to church picnics.

He  marries and has two kids;  he  feels nothing towards his family but plays the part of loving husband and father.  He plays it so well that his wife never doubts his love and loves him devotedly in return,  to his kids he's a beloved role model.

His last thought as dies,  deeply mourned by all who knew him and leaving the world a better place,  is; Ha, fooled them all.  I win.

Was he a good man or a monster How should he be judged? 
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Male 739
LordJim "A  child is born and  gradually becomes aware that is  different,  he has no empathy and is incapable of love but he consciously and cynically decides that being perceived as " good " is his best interests. "

At that point, "At school he is popular " is virtually impossible.

But back to the question: As these deeds were done out of self interest, they are not morally good. Neither were they bad. (That's according to Immanuel Kant as well as Isa ibn Maryam.) His good deeds are not described above, nor are his sins.
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Male 6,364
LordJim I judge him a good man, because we tend to judge others on their actions, while we give ourselves leeway by taking into account our intentions.

I think it would be better to have everyone PRETENDING to be 'good' like the fellow in your story vs everyone being the shitbags they are today.
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Male 1,124
LordJim wow. This went to waste. 
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Male 11,563
LordJim Only God can judge.
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Male 172
monkwarrior so can Morgan Freeman
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Male 11,563
dieseljuice1891 maybe in a movie but not like God in reality
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Male 8,261
dieseljuice1891 Maybe not now. 
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Male 8,261
monkwarrior I was hoping for something a little more nuanced.  Oh, well. 
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Male 8,261
monkwarrior That wasn't the question,  but never mind. 
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5,989
monkwarrior she's already been judged by God and she's in that special level of Hell reserved for the Servants of God
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Male 11,563
dm2754 God is the only one who knows though.
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Male 172
monkwarrior Morgan Freeman knows all as well
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Male 11,563
dieseljuice1891 maybe in a movie  but not in reality.
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Male 1,124
Ok. The comments below made me curious. 
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Male 1,124
bearbear01 spooky. 
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5,989
a little late to the party isn't he.
There's been a few books written about it. Penn and Teller did it show about it 10 years ago.

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Male 123
dm2754 "But in 1994, three years before her death, journalist Christopher Hitchens made this provocative film asking if her reputation was deserved."
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5,989
popsicle01 I didn't realize this was that old.
That explains the quality
I didn't notice anything was written underneath the video. Lol now I feel silly.
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Male 17,314
If she had been working in a developed country, she'd be serving multiple life terms.
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Male 6,364
mountebank... What a great word, we need to bring this one back.
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Male 43,818
daegog    I don't think I've heard that word before and today I've heard it twice.
Once in this video and the other 
Batman: The Animated Series Volume 2, Episode 6 "The Laughing Fish"
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Male 8,261
daegog From the Italian;  to climb on the bench"
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