Going Online Like It's 1979!

Submitted by: scheckydamon 1 month ago in Tech


Now I feel really old. I remember BBS systems, and my trusty 300 baud acoustic modem. Who else had a similar rig?
There are 26 comments:
Male 679
I had a Vic 20. I could talk to other vic 20. And play pac-man.

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Male 497
zeegrr I have very fond memories of my VIC20. The colour, the sound, the resolution - at the time it was amazing!
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Male 17,080
I remember my school PTA held a fundraiser for a 1MB HDD.

Mind you, back in the day, you could fit quite a lot of porn on a 1MB HDD, so it was reasonable value for money.
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Male 115
Had a whole room of 'trash-80's' in my computer lab in HS. I remember one kid would routinely wait until class was almost over and then spam "What a waste of paper!" to the dot matrix printer, which started printing as soon as the bell rang. 
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Male 653
We had a Prime Computer mainframe at my high school.  If you needed to do any of your schoolwork from home (Ahhh..Basic, Fortran, and Cobol) you had to sign out a green-screen computer and a phone cradle modem and lug that thing home.  All 35lbs of it.  Then just when you finally got the mainframe to accept your connection...."get off of that thing...I need to make a phone call..." 
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Male 852
Wow that looks troublesome, no wonder kids those days prefer to play outside. I kid I kid.
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Male 733
I built my first computer out of parts from Radio Shack in the '70s (don't remember the exact year), but it was programmed by toggle switches, didn't really do anything, and the program was gone when the computer powered off. Radio Shack at that time carried every component one could imagine, and all the clerks were full-on electronics nerds.
I still have my commodore 16 and my Mac 128.

The BBSs were absolutely amazing. Then. To us nerds.
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Female 891
I worked on a computer just like this one in 1987. I am pretty sure this is actually a bit too advanced for 1979, but I could be wrong. I don't recall knowing anyone or any business with a personal computer in 1979, the year I graduated high school.
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Male 1,783
i was working in a startup, and had access to some mainframe on an hourly  basis.  I had this thing that looked like and elongated typewriter, and you would put the phone headset into some big holes in the back of the thing, and it would talk to the mainframe at some gawd awful low baud rate.  it was all batch processing, so you did not mind so much
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Male 4,968
Avocado Green Rotary Phone FTW!!!

I have one in my kitchen but a wall mounted version.

Love the old school tech, excellent vid.
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Male 1,381
I had a TRS-80 model 1.  Used it and our 300 baud modem to contact a university system in the UK and obtained the chemical forumula, molecular structure, and processing sequences for cocaine.  Dad was not happy.
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Male 43,283
LOL !!  I used a Tandy TRS-80 at work.  
6 inch floppy disks. When the 3.5 inch came out it was so small!!! oooooo!

Now I look at the "micro-computer" tag and laugh
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Male 1,381
Gerry1of1 Not 6" , 5 1/4".  The big floppy diskettes were 10 1/2"
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Male 1,151
punko Actually they were 8".  And I remember when the 3.5" came out users would call them "hard disks" and you couldn't tell them otherwise.

Remember cutting notches on the other side of the 5-1/4" disks and flipping them over to make your own double-sided disk?
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Male 1,381
nettech98 The usability on backside was awful.  Only 1 out of 4 disks would work properly

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Male 1,381
punko what I remember was loading off teh damn cassette.  I'd play "super star trek" and there was a 50/50 chance that the computer would run out of memory if the game took too long

I also remember the enjoyment if figuring out how scott adams (not of dilbert fame) programmed his adventure games and understanding the rudimentary parser he used

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Male 43,283
punko   same thing. We called them 6" disks but it was an office 
full of men so it was natural we said it was a bit bigger than it was.
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Male 733
Gerry1of1 Nothing wrong with rounding up. If the office were full of women, the 5-1/4" disk would be the "petite" size.
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Male 2,083
Gerry1of1 What do you mean, floppy, big boy? Them’s fightin’ words.
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Male 132
I still have a TRS-80 with dual 5.25 disks and a daisy wheel printer in my attic. The acoustic coupler's long gone (75/1200 baud)
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Male 43,283
agurney   I remember daily wheel printers. I always thought the ball printer was faster.
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Male 1,151
Gerry1of1 How about the 5x7 dot matrix?
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Male 4,968
nettech98 I use to fix old OkiData dot matrix printers in the shipping warehouse for my old...OLD job.

They were tough as shit and rather simple maintenance.  Lasted forever.
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Male 2,083
nettech98 I’ll see you that and raise you an IBM 1403 line printer.
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Male 43,283
nettech98   Those were so LOUD when they printed
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Male 2,083
Gerry1of1 The 1403 was so loud it sat in its own cabinet. 
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