"Gun-Share" Exhibit Points Out Easy Access To Assault Weapons

Submitted by: abetterworld 5 months ago in Entertainment News & Politics


Visitors to Chicago can see an art installation this week that aims to show how easy it is for ordinary Americans to gain access to high-powered guns.

The installation, called the Metro Gun Share Program, is a mockup of an urban bike-sharing dock.

Ten "guns" are displayed in a row, replicas of the AR-15 semi-automatic rifle, the same kind of weapon that was used in the Parkland, Fla., high school shooting that left 17 dead in February.

The Chicago-based Escape Pod advertising agency partnered with the Brady Centre to Prevent Gun Violence to launch the exhibit in Daley Plaza.

The agency said the installation will be in the plaza through May 16.

A sign near the display suggests some of the tightening of gun laws needs to occur at the federal level. It says the neighbouring state of Indiana has some of laxest gun control laws in the country, and that "one in five Chicago crime guns come from Indiana."

The sign says Chicago has a high rate of gun deaths, despite Illinois having some of the country's toughest gun control laws in the U.S.

Illinois congressman Mike Quigley joined in the discussion on Monday, tweeting that 60 per cent of recovered Chicago crime guns come from out of state.

"Getting a gun shouldn't be as easy as renting a bike — but in many cases, it is," the Democrat said.

Quigley said the exhibit "reminds us just how dangerously simple it can be for an everyday civilian to obtain a weapon of war." Source: Chicago Tribune
There are 25 comments:
Male 109
Besides the reductio ad absurdum going on here, something made me stop reading for a moment there-
one in five Chicago crime guns come from Indiana.
Where do the other 80% come from?
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Male 910
I-Am-Annoyed Well, to be fair, Indiana is a whopping 16 miles from Chicago city center and is a completely contiguous and seamless community. I think its pretty obvious that Indiana is preying on Illinois residents and definitely not simply part of the Chicago urban sprawl (sarcasm intended).
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6,574
I-Am-Annoyed everywhere else
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6,574
If we looked past all the propaganda lies about the shooting let's try to remember the truth.
He did not use a Colt AR-15 in the shooting. Pretty much every single gun made is a semi-automatic weapon.
Fully semi-automatic isn't a real thing. That's as meaningful as genuine imitation.
The gun he used was a small 22 caliber weapon. 
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6,574
There are numerous gun ranges around the country where you can rent a gun.
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Male 10,002
dm2754 yes, but onl for use at that particular gun range, for the most part.

And renting one is much more difficult than a bike sharing program.
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Male 18,152
If you embrace universal gun ownership you need to embrace ubiquitous gun crime, because human nature is as it is, especially (ironically) in societies where guns are most prevalent.
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6,574
Draculya there meny places where there is high gun ownership and low gun crime
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Male 777
Damn, if it is so much easier to get guns in Indiana then crime must be off the charts there.
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Female 6,443
Aren't they violating US Federal law pt 272 of Title 15 of the Code of Federal Regulations by not having the required orange tip?
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Male 849
melcervini Are you serious?  It's an art exhibit... you know, a sculpture... like a statue.  Moreover, the guns are permanently affixed to the base and can't be removed.  Are you really suggesting that all statues with a gun in them be retrofitted so the guns have blaze-orange tips?  Won't that ruin all the Republicans' beloved confederate statues?
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Male 10,002
skeeter01 The guns can’t be removed from the rack.  I guess the ‘art’ does correctly reflect that it’s much easier to get a bike (which can be removed from a rack) than a gun (which, it seems, are not removable).
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Male 849
megrendel well, I guess if you look at it in the literal sense, then yes, that is true.  I guess you're one of those "art is literal" people then, huh?  Mona Lisa is just some lady; the Sistine Chapel is just some old dude touching fingers with a naked younger dude on a foggy day;  the shadow in Nelson Shank's portrait of Bill Clinton is NOT a subtle nod to the Monica Lewinsky scandal; and dogs playing poker actually happened.  Damn, I really hope that last one is true.  

By the way, the joke wasn't lost on me; you got a genuine laugh out of me there.  I think I may finally be seeing beyond your political leanings and recognizing your wry sense of humor... Unless I'm wrong and you weren't joking, in which case, ignore this paragraph.
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Male 10,002
skeeter01 Actually, GOOD art can be taken on so many levels.

Yes, the Mona Lisa is some lady, but I'd like to know what she's thinking behind that smile.

The Sistine Chapel is a brilliant work by a brilliant artiest.

I like Shank's style.

And Dog's Playing Poker is one of the best works ever.

But, this is one my personal favorite pieces is The Treachery of Images by René Magritte (although, not for the art itself, but it's meaning).



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6,574
melcervini it's not considered a toy it's an art installation 
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Male 18,152
melcervini if I bought a gun, I'd make sure I get an orange barrel
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Male 927
melcervini Since they are (presumably) permanently attached to their stand, it is probably a statue with gunlike portions.  
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Female 6,443
muert I dont think that matters unless you're doing it to fit a narrative, then its okay to break the law?
 (1) Except as provided in paragraph (2) or (3), each toy, look-alike, or imitation firearm shall have as an integral part, permanently affixed, a blaze orange plug inserted in the barrel of such toy, look-alike, or imitation firearm. 
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Male 849
melcervini Interesting how you accuse muert of "...doing [something] to fit a narrative" and use only the part of the U.S. code you referenced that helps you make your point.  Did you purposefully ignore the title of this code?  In case you didn't see it, it's called, "Penalties for entering into commerce of imitation firearms."  This code is about the manufacture and sale of imitation firearms.  It does not cover imitation firearms permanently affixed to sculpture. 

Also, did you purposefully ignore the rest of the code?  I ask because the rest of the code completely negates your point.  I've copied Paragraph C below for your reading pleasure.

(c) “Look-alike firearm” defined
For purposes of this section, the term “look-alike firearm” means any imitation of any original firearm which was manufactured, designed, and produced since 1898, including and limited to toy guns, water guns, replica nonguns, and air-soft guns firing nonmetallic projectiles. Such term does not include any look-alike, nonfiring, collector replica of an antique firearm developed prior to 1898, or traditional B–B, paint-ball, or pellet-firing air guns that expel a projectile through the force of air pressure.
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Female 6,443
skeeter01 i accused Muert of nothing, I was talking about the folks putting on the exhibit and others that try to make examples of 'loose laws' and end up committing federal crimes in the process.
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Male 849
melcervini I see now that you didn't accuse muert... My apologies to both of you.  However, you did accuse the folks putting on the exhibit of doing something to fit their narrative, implying that's bad, and at the same you do the very same thing.
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Male 18,152
melcervini it's a statue. Statues don't need orange tips.

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Male 5,192
melcervini They don't care about laws.
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Male 849
trimble you are incorrect.  We just read and abide by the entire law, not just the cherry-picked parts that we think will help us make our point.
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Female 6,443
trimble they certainly dont care enough about them to enforce them.
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