What's The Deepest Hole We Can Possibly Dig?

Submitted by: fancylad 5 months ago in Science Weird


Or as I like to ask, 'How deep is your mom's ass?' Seriously though -- what is the deepest hole that's ever been dug?
There are 13 comments:
Male 1,769
we need to dig a deep wide hole on Oak Island!  I am tired of hearing those clowns speculating on where the "Money Pit" is located
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Male 7,254
The people around, of abandon'd Morals, and profligate Principles--Rude--Ignorant--void of Manners, Education, or Good Breeding. No genteel or Polite Creature among them, save Mr. Punko, a Gargoyle and sometime Civil Engineer.

Since there's no Open Forum posted tonight, I'm taking the liberty of writing about whatever here.

I've just come across a fascinating book: The Carolina Backcountry on the Eve of the Revolution: The Journal and Other Writings of Charles Woodmason, Anglican Itinerant. (The entry above, which I've modified slightly, is from Sunday, September 21st, 1766.)

One of my favorite comic novels is John Barth's The Sot-Weed Factor (1960), which is a fictional account of one Ebenezer Cooke and his misadventures in the New World. I'm quite certain Barth must have used Woodmason's journal as inspiration.

Some of the entries are hilarious. The journal starts as Woodmason sets sail from Old England to Charleston. During the two months of the voyage, not a little friction develops between the young minister and his fellow travelers. Problems first emerge in the entry for Sunday, June 22, 1766:

Collected them together at Divine Service--Refus'd attending in the afternoon. Captain and Londoners went to Cards.

One can just see the disapproving scowl on Woodmason's face. The following Sunday, things deteriorate further:

A Criminal Commerce enter'd into between the Gentlemen and Ladies--Read them Lectures of Continence and Temperance. Laughed at and Ridiculed.

Things did not improve in the following weeks.

Sunday, July 6th
Ships Company attended--Behaved Ludicrously.

Sunday, July 27th
All the passengers at Divine Service--Captain and Women behav'd indecently.

Sunday, August 3d
Refus'd to officiate any more, as they turn'd both the Sermon and Service to Raillery.

If anyone's interested in more of this, Amazon offers the book. It's pricey because it has a narrow audience. You can find copies of the book at lower prices from online used booksellers (in fact, many of the used copies are hardcovers, whereas the Amazon edition is paperback).
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Male 2,022
squrlz4ever I betcha they was eating Squrlz!
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Male 7,254
scheckydamon Definitely. And just about anything else they could manage to kill: beavers, possums, raccoons, muskrats, turtles, skunks, porcupines, groundhogs--they were all on the menu.

The picture Woodmason paints is fairly shocking. The people in the Carolina backcountry--really the frontier of the 1760s--are just managing to survive, with all their energies consumed in finding food, some meager shelter, and some rough clothing. There are no schools and there are no courts of law. Most of the population is illiterate. Bridges are nonexistent, so crossing a river meant swimming or finding a shallow area to ford it on your horse.

It's really eye-opening to see just how chaotic and wild a colony we were at the time of the American Revolution.
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Male 2,022
squrlz4ever There was a PBS documentary I think was called the Hillbillys. It might have been 3 hours long but it was a remarkable in depth look at these folks and their life in the hills. I love being in the Blue Ridge and meeting folks that trace all the way back with their kin folks. I've learned so much from them. Moonshining is the skill I'm so glad I picked up.
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Male 7,254
scheckydamon Sounds like you might be interested in the Foxfire books, if you haven't read them already. It's a series that records details of Appalachian life, from beekeeping to moonshining to ghost stories. I haven't read any of the Foxfire books myself, but I've glanced at them and they look good.

It's fortunate that someone decided to document that culture so extensively before it's disappeared.
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Male 2,022
squrlz4ever Read them in my teens and live about 50 miles from Rabun County now.
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Male 7,254
scheckydamon Wow. Go, you!
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Male 2,022
squrlz4ever  We'ins SC are a lot like the N. Georgia folks. We're just more selective in our women folk. In SC, a woman with two teeth is called a keeper.  I'll show myself out now!
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Male 1,370
repost.  And I even remember having to do a bunch of calculations about earth moving . . .
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Male 5,257
punko we need more flat earth submissions
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Male 9,582
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Male 1,940
We will need to wait until November 3rd 2020 to find that out - were still working on it.

I predict a shortcut to some awesome Chinese food:)
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