'SNL' Take on Sexual Harassment And Matt Lauer In "Welcome To Hell"

Submitted by: fancylad 8 months ago in Entertainment Funny


Not the show's best skit, but there were some funny lines here.
There are 13 comments:
Male 43,818
not their best work
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Male 8,033
Gerry1of1 I agree. It's obviously a spoof of Katy Perry's California Gurls video, but I don't think the satire works all that well.

I also think the outrage over male sexual indiscretions in our mass consciousness has gone over the top. Have you heard about Garrison Keillor? At the age of 75, he's been fired from Minnesota Public Radio for allegedly placing his hand on the bare back of a woman. There may be more to the story, but at this point, that's the only detail that's been released.

While I don't want to excuse any of the serious acts of sexual assault or sexual misconduct that have occurred, I think things have been going a bit overboard of late. Claims of male sexual misconduct seem to be on the verge of becoming a mania or fad.
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Male 4,080
squrlz4ever "Claims of male sexual misconduct seem to be on the verge of becoming a mania or fad." you are not wrong. but then again, celebrities dying in 2016 was practically a mania or fad, but i doubt there were people eager to jump on the bandwagon or drink the kool aid. sometimes, things just happen, and when it happens, it happens all at once. when the boston globe reported on pedophile priests at the beginning of 2002, it wasnt just a story of one pedophile priest molesting one child, it was decades of priests molesting children and being protected by the church, and it wasnt something that was slowly rolled out and introduced to the world, it was something that was all laid out in front of us in detail.
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Male 8,033
robthelurker That's a good comparison about the Catholic Church and the molestations. You're right: It was like opening a floodgate, and it makes sense that these sexual assault and sexual misconduct stories would unfold similarly. Keeping that in mind helps me make sense of this deluge of bad news.
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Male 7,224
Its only sexual harassment.if she does not like the guy else it is flirting
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Male 900
thezigrat That really is a huge problem. Defining an action as inappropriate based on the response requires the action to be completed before being judged. Obviously there is no reason to act sexually aggressive towards women, but the actions should be unequivocally wrong regardless of the outcome...
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Male 8,033
thezigrat In some instances, I think that's true. Certainly, it's a really tricky subject.

Perhaps some kind of Rule of Repetition should apply. If a guy says "You look nice today" or "That color's good on you" to a female coworker and she says "Thanks," all's good. But if she responds "That's inappropriate" or "I'd rather you didn't talk about my appearance," from that point forward, if he continues to make such remarks, the behavior should be considered harassing. But the first comment gets a pass. Maybe?

Of course then you've got the situation of a male manager making the remark to a female subordinate, who probably wouldn't feel comfortable responding "That's inappropriate." So clearly this idea of mine doesn't work when there's a disparity of power.

The last paragraph of mine suggests that the safest course would be to ban remarks on female appearance in the workplace. Hmm. Perhaps that's the answer, but it seems pretty sterile. I'm certain there have been at least a dozen occasions when I've said to a female coworker (and yes, sometimes a subordinate), "Don't you look sharp today!" or something similar; it was sincerely meant, it was received with a smile, and I got the sense I'd just given the recipient a boost in her mood. Was I out of line? ~ponders~
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Male 6,364
squrlz4ever I do not think you would have a lot of issues with that statement.  Some guys (I think more than a few) don't know when they have crossed the line.  I have heard men in the office tell women that a certain dress makes their ass look great.  To me, that is a huge no no, but to each their own.

I think as a general rule, if you wouldn't give a compliment to a man at work, don't give it to a woman, that's typically a safe sentiment.  Of course, exceptions exist, but it's usually ok.
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Male 4,080
squrlz4ever are you the type of squirrel who would also compliment a male coworker if you noticed they had a new hair cut or something?

i wonder if im ever out of line with my female coworkers too. honestly i dont think second guessing ourselves is a bad thing, this is something we should think about.
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Male 8,033
robthelurker I've definitely remarked on a male coworker's outfit (a suit, usually) if it's something unusual. "You're all spiffed up today--client meeting?" And when it comes to complimenting female coworkers, it's fairly unusual for me. If I had to guess, I'd say I've done it maybe once every couple of months. It's by no means a regular or habitual thing.

I imagine everyone knows of that one guy in the department who's constantly complimenting women on their appearance. Blecch. It isn't good; everyone considers the guy to be throwing out troll lines and constantly on the make.

Yes, some self-examination is a healthy thing. In wake of all the media coverage about sexual misconduct, I may stop commenting on appearances altogether (with the exception of a couple female coworkers that I've known for years and am friendly with out of work). The risk of a misstep or misinterpretation is just too great.
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