Photographs Of Child Labor In The United States, Late 1800s - Early 1900s

Submitted by: holygod 1 month ago in Lifestyle Weird

A reminder of what life was like before the stupid government stuck their noses in and meddled. Let the free market decide.

These photographs were taken by Lewis Hines who so against child workers he left his schoolteaching job in New York and for the next 15 years or so, he travelled around America documenting children working from the mines of Pennsylvania to the cotton mills in Georgia and Alabama for the National Child Labor Committee hoping to bring an end to child labor. 

It wasn’t an easy job and Hines often operated in disguise. Photo historian Daile Kaplan:

Nattily dressed in a suit, tie, and hat, Hine the gentleman actor and mimic assumed a variety of personas — including Bible salesman, postcard salesman, and industrial photographer making a record of factory machinery — to gain entrance to the workplace.

When unable to deflect his confrontations with management, he simply waited outside the canneries, mines, factories, farms, and sweatshops with his fifty pounds of photographic equipment and photographed children as they entered and exited the workplace. He was frequently threatened with violence or even death by factory police and foremen.























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There are 22 comments:
Male 1,381
Extra! Extra! Read all about it! I shouldn't be working! 
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Male 4,392
ya, Let make America great again 
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Male 531
But you guys love your shoes and cell phones don't you?

https://www.dol.gov/agencies/ilab/resources/reports/child-labor/asia-pacific
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Male 4,383
I don't think I've ever heard an argument for letting the free market decide the legal age for our children to be employees.
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Male 40,588
trimble Part of the Libertarian Party charter is the removal of all child labour laws. The only reason I can think of to get rid of laws protecting children is to put them to work.  Most libertarians don't even know that's in their charter.
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Male 10,380
trimble I've heard the argument that the government shouldn't regulate business at all. I've heard that often. I mean a true strict libertarian would argue that the government has no right to make the child labor law wouldn't they?
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Male 4,383
holygod Some would. Some would argue the parents should have the role of governing what their children do. 
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Female 8,181
trimble - but when it comes to work or starve? Which it did..... 
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Male 669
I had an argument once with a native girl in high school where she was like, "When you people stole our land from us."

And I'm like, "I'm Irish. My ancestors came here to get thrown in coal mines and buried in shallow graves."

I might be related to some of these kids.
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Male 210
Oh, all that white privilege. 
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Female 8,181
srximus - yup, because when they DID earn a few quid, and stayed out after dusk no one lynched them. They could escape-  maybe they did, or they didn't, but no one tied them to a car bumper, or beat them to death for no other reason than their skin.
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Male 8,792
Why are these always submitted in such a way to try and infer that Child Labor and Slavery were something that was unique to the US?
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Female 4,659
megrendel and still going on in China et al
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Male 210
megrendel 
Slavery in those days was exclusive to the "New World". Vast majority of the slaves ended up in Central and South America, owned by Portugal, Spain, Holland and the French.
American slavery was the strangest one as the USA was an independent western nation which had slaves within its own society. No other western societies had this. All the slaves were confined in the working fields and plantations outside of the owners national borders. So, banning slavery was more of an cosmetic thing and administrative trouble for, let's say a french slave owner. He had to get new documentation and keep his slaves on its overseas plantation under a middle man or so called "front business". Yet, no slaves were allowed in France.

At the same time Industrial Revolution in Europe was already in its last phase of social changes = child labor was banned and Social Liberalism was spreading throughout the continent.

That's why the child labor and the slavery are portrayed as an unike American issue in the late 19th and early 20th century. Because it was.
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Male 8,792
srximus Slavery in those days was exclusive to the "New World". 

That would be incorrect (aka complete bullshit).

At the same time (and subsequently in some cases) slavery also existed in Africa, the Middle East, Asia (Korea, Thailand, etc), Portugal and Netherlands...just to name a few.
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Male 5,427
srximus You're wrong about child labor: It was by no means unique to America in the late 19th and early 20th century. At the time of these photos, child laborers were common in South America, Europe, Africa, and Asia. I don't know what you could be basing your statement on.
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Male 2,136
I'm glad there are child labor law now, but I also wish my 11 year old would not whine when he has to take out the trash or do the dishes. 
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Female 4,659
chicagojay dont give them the WiFi password until chores are done :D
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Male 10,380
melcervini Yep. I saw that meme once. Seems like a good idea. Just change the password every morning and then don't give it to them until their chores and homework are done. I attempted it. Problem is I have over 25 devices connected to wifi and I would have to change the password on all of them. It was a big fucking hassle. So then I created a network just for them and that was the only password I changed.
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Female 4,659
holygod Boomparenting! :D  I saw another meme where it suggested taking the charger away so the child is forced to watch the phone slowly die.
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Male 5,427
melcervini LOL! The latter half of your last sentence there is hilarious, Mel.
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Male 8,204
chicagojay Stupid liberal.  Let the free market decide!
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