New Law In New York Means Parents Of Bullies Will Have To Pay The Price

Submitted by: kalron27 2 months ago in News & Politics


The North Tawanda, New York Common Council recently passed a law that will hold parents responsible for their child's bullying behavior.  According to the law, if a child is repeatedly found bullying another student, their parent will either pay a $250 fine or spend 15 days in jail.

Some bullies are a byproduct of their parents, some are just a bully in their own right, is it fair to paint with a broad brush in this case?  Why jail or fine?  Wouldn't something like a visit from a social worker or trip to the psych for an eval be a better solution?  I guess for-profit punishment has trickled down to our kids now.  I personally always felt that my "bullies" in life were lessons I learned from.

There are 20 comments:
Female 425
Can I just add a pennys thought here.....having worked in the school system for close to 17 years I can tell you that MORE often than not the bullies themselves had parents who were equally matched. The parents are usually the same type personality and rarely did I see them troubled by their son/daughter being the aggressor and it was looked on more like "hey my kid is tough and he/ she is going to hold their own" No accountability for their child so I have to say given my experience closely I have no issue w/ this law....Kids learn from their homelife that then transfers to the outside world.
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Male 40,560
I say Do This to the bullies


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Male 40,560
Parents have always theoretically been responsible for their children but it's never been enforced {unless you can sue for money}

I'm sure the parent will only pay the fine ONCE and then bully their kid into submission.
Unless the kids just psycho.
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Male 3,801
WTF the vid is gone.  Here is another link...

https://globalnews.ca/news/3792785/parents-jail-anti-bullying-law/
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Male 1,604
What ever happened to the idea of not being punished for things you didn't do? If the kid is bullying someone, punish the kid. Especially after tying the hands of parents and not allowing them to properly discipline their kids. Penalizing them for being little undisciplined assholes is the next logical step.
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Male 3,347
squidbush My wife and I never had issued disciplining our children. Further, we never had to resort to beating or spanking them, shaming them - popular these days, making kids stand in a public place wearing a sign stating their transgression, or verbal abuse.
We did not depend on outside agencies or institutions, nor did we whine about limited legal means to discipline our kids.
Most parents - in my opinion - are not active enough in their children's lives, do not participate in their children's lives, and so do not really know their children.
Outside of anger and abuse, it's difficult to discipline someone you don't know.
Hence, kids get into all kinds of situations, develop all kinds of thought processes and traits, parents do not know about and can't effectively correct.
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Male 1,561
squidbush nobody said you couldn't discipline your kid, but like the act that created him, we dont want to see it in public (unless your wife is smokin', know what I mean?)
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Female 8,177
This simply means it is an option- it makes it plain that bullying is a crime, one with a victim and a perpetrator. If you find ( as you should) that minor children are not responsible then this provides a way to establish the culpability of the parents-are  they responsible- are they taking all necessary steps to ensure their children behave appropriately.
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Male 4,191
The first court case for this charge will be fascinating to watch.
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2,919
Anyone got a link to the law? I'd really like to see how they defined 'bullying' or if its left rather vague.  
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Male 1,845
skypirate Here you go. The word "may" is used, so a judge will have the determination of how stiff the penalty will be. The term "bullying" is defined as "A form of harassment and is defined as an intentional course of conduct which is reasonably likely to intimidate, emotionally abuse, slander or threaten another person and which serves no legitimate purpose." Still rather subjective and allows all parties to argue within the court as to what these terms really mean. Interesting that it's totally fine to emotionally abuse someone so long as you can also prove to the court that you were emotionally abusing that person in order to serve a "legitimate purpose."

There have been some law professors who wonder if a city has the authority to issue jail time, or whether it should just be up to the state, but chances are that nobody so egregious to allow a judge to send them to jail will actually challenge this law in a court.
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Male 3,801
bliznik Hey thanks for this, I actually looked for it too.
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2,919
bliznik Thanks!
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Male 15,402
"I want an XBOX or I swear I'll trip little Billy in the playground again. Do you want to go to jail? It's your choice."
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Male 9
Draculya maybe you are joking - maybe not.  Perhaps it's the responsibility of the parent(s) to teach their child not to rely on threats like this to get what they want.  In my opinion if it has gotten to the point where your child is extorting you for an xbox you should seek professional help in raising your kids.
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Male 1,845
colossalman In my opinion, any parent that lets their child bully them like that maybe deserves what they get.
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Male 1,891
You have to punish the bully who commits the act.  The parent can be punished indirectly by requiring them to attend the punishment as a chaperone for the child.  

Imagine a 15 day retreat for the bully spent three weeks in a row.  You aren't putting the parent in jail for something they did not do but at the same time you are allowing them to feel the pain for failing to raise their child properly.  

This should also come with immunity for killing CPS workers and other court officials that tie the hands of a parent trying to curb bad behavior.  Yes, there is a personal story behind that comment and the damage suffered as a result of government officials thinking they know better when they can't tell they have their heads firmly in the colon.
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Male 4,390
it wont work
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Male 8,792
I'm split on this.  Yes, it's a good idea to attempt to hold parents responsible, but at the same time it sets a bad precedent.  I can see it evolving into parents being sued by ambulance chasers in perpetuity even if said 'child' in their 40's. 
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