Cube Of Sand Holds Up A Car

Submitted by: squrlz4ever 1 month ago in Science


A look into the properties of mechanically stabilized earth. This is for a certain gargoyle with a background in civil engineering.
There are 21 comments:
Male 1,317
Too bad Billy Mays and Ron Popeil have departed us.  I can just see a channel 397 infomercial on the amazing engineering creation: Block-O-Sand, with 1001 uses!

But wait!  There’s more....
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Male 1,317
Thanks for the vid.  In Iraq, army engineers used a geotextile material in roadbed construction to provide this type of reinforcement to the sandy soil.

The material looked like simple black cloth and came on rolls about 6’ long.
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Male 4,952
woodyville06 Very cool. I had no idea this was done by the U.S. in Iraq, but that makes perfect sense. I suppose the military, when moving lots of dirt around to make bases and roads, uses MSE (mechanically stabilized earth) a lot.
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Male 3,496
So what is the normal reinforcement materials used for this sort of building on roads with those vertical walls?  My first thought would be some sort of pressure treated wood?  Or would that still rot too fast?  Metal sheets?
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Male 4,952
daegog The reinforcement materials are usually called geogrids. Most of the time it's some kind of heavy-duty plastic net or grid. Here are a few pics.

A few different styles of geogrid, with a red pen at the bottom for scale.

Geogrid being applied on an embankment.

An illustration showing how to use geogrid with a retaining wall.
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Male 860
Thanks for the linky.  I've used variations on this on a number of projects.  Its not quite as cheap as they make out, but its cheaper than making solid concrete retaining walls and then backfilling.

The left out the important bits between cohesionless soils like sands and gravels, and clayey soils (which we have a lot of here),  but they do give you the correct impression that geotechnical engineering is an important subset to civil engineering as a whole.

I didn't do geotechnical engineering, but we did implement designs that took recommendations from the work done by geotechnical engineers on our behalf.
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Male 4,952
punko You're welcome. I thought of you for obvious reasons when I first saw this and figured you could add some depth to it. Until your comment, I'd never even heard the phrase geotechnical engineering.

What I liked about this was that it gives me some clue as to how those earth ramps and embankments that I drive on were built. And like I said to Gerry, I'm kind of interested in employing the videographer's windowscreen technique to build a two-meter-tall sandcastle.
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Male 756
Engineering humor at its finest!

"I dropped this 25lb load from 6 feet up to simulate dropping a 25lb load from 6 feet up" !
heheheh :D
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Male 1,317
stifler you said load. Hehe.
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Male 3,410
woodyville06 a 25 pound load!
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Male 1,317
rumham DAMN!  You definitely don’t want to drop that one at home.
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Male 8,560
stifler Arlo Guthrie would be proud
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Male 39,955
huh ?
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Male 4,952
Gerry1of1 'Tis a bit geeky, but I found it interesting. If you've ever driven on a curving highway offramp or onramp, you've probably driven on mechanically stabilized earth. Plus, this video gives a great idea for making MONSTER sandcastles.
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Male 39,955
squrlz4ever  huh ?
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Male 3,410
Gerry1of1 part 2 in my 3 part expose of squirrelz
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Male 4,952
rumham I got your squirrel poops right here! ~raises tail~
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Male 4,952
Gerry1of1 ~Squrlz gives a Bronx cheer~ *plthhhhhhh* 
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Male 3,410
squrlz4ever brrrrrrunnnnnt
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Male 3,410
thats not how you spell the sound of a fart!!!
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Male 4,952
rumham Opinions differ on fart orthography.
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