New Research Suggests That Lucy (An Early Version Of Man) Died When She Fell From A Tree

Submitted by: fancylad 4 months ago in Science


Lucy, the 3.18-million-year-old Australopithecus afarensis -- considered one of the oldest and most complete fossil hominins and an erect-walking human ancestor -- most likely died when she fell from a tree. 
There are 49 comments:
Male 1
Interesting information in this video but I can't believe in this version without source...
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Male 8
Interestingly of course, the next version of the appearance ...
ip 192.168.l.l
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Male 2
This is Best blog high interesting and full of information Great one of story. I still waiting for next keep posting. Buy Essays

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Female 7,953
Its so cool- especially now we realise our immediate family tree is many branched...so many hominids.
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Male 264
Where was life alert 3.18 million years ago?
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Male 3,807
She died when Charlie Brown bashed her head in with a rock for yanking that football away one too many times.
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Male 1,526
I know that the Theory that Lucy fell out of a tree is not right, I went on Google Earth and looked up the place that Lucy (the Afar Triangle area of Ethiopia) was found and there is not a tree in side of 100 miles. So she could not have fallen out of a tree. And we all know that things don't change that much even over 3.18-million-years.
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Male 444
casaledana hehe, it's pretty nuts if you want to think about how long ago that was. For reference, the startings of the Grand Canyon are only about 6-7 million years old. These fossils are almost half as old. 
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Male 5,427
thething911 especially considering the Earth is only 5000 years old :-?
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36
casaledana I hope this is a joke post, otherwise the ignorance displayed is appalling.  We can see vast areas of Africa being desertified in our lifetime, let alone three million years.  You know that the northern US and Eurasia were under a mile+ of glacier ice 12,000 years ago, right?  Even the young earth cretinists admit there was an Ice Age, but they make it even more recent, just after the Noachian flood about 4K years ago.

No one thinks that the landscape is static, especially over millions of years! And there are fossils of tree leaves, wood, and pollen found in the same sediments where the bones were discovered.
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Male 5,427
stevopusser To your IAB welcome ~offers tentacled hand to shake~
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Female 8
thank you guys, glad to join your community!
192.168.1.1
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Male 4,098
stevopusser

Welcome to IAB! He was joking, people have a way of doing that on here, especially Gerry1of1. casaledana also said that he "went back in time and pushed her out of the tree."  you said it yourself:

No one thinks that the landscape is static, especially over millions of years!

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Male 1
I am really glad to read it and being able to share my thoughts on it. I want to use this opportunity to say that I really love this blog. It is an amazing resource of information for my working. Thank you so much. a10, color switch
 
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Male 5,427
a10games To IAB Welcome ~Offers tentacled hand to shake~
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Male 3,982
thezigrat *tsk tsk* Zig, haven't you heard of the 1st IAB Commandment? Thou shalt not extend a welcome to commercial spambots.
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Male 5,427
squrlz4ever K...  can I eat him?
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Male 3,982
thezigrat By all means. Devour with extreme prejudice.  :)
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Male 39,265
It's only a theory after all
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Female 3,913
Gerry1of1 I heard that in a monty-pythoneske tone
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Female 172
Darwinism.
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Male 606
This theory was discounted months ago.
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Male 1,526
punko   I read some of the Theory's of the debunkers and it seams to me that there reasoning is faulty in that they have failed to account for some of the breaks that show a fall and claim that all the breaks are from time and not allowing that some could be from a fall and are discounting the expert interpretation from 9 different orthopedic surgeons that all feel that the breaks they are looking at are consistent with a fall from about 45 feet and reaching about 35 miles per hour. It seams to me that both theories could be completely viable. A fall killed her and the bones were also broken by 3.18-million-years in the dirt. And of course both are only Theories. I know the real truth I went back in time and pushed her out of the tree because she was cheating on me.
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Male 39,265
the Stupid  Cow
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Male 3,982
Gerry1of1 "I beg your pardon!"

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Male 5,427
Idea for a new movie "Cavemen don't bounce!"
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Male 5,427
guess she was not much of a tree hugger
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Male 39,767
Interesting... no catgirl required here... lolz!
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Male 2,902
...or pushed...I CALL FOR FURTHER INVESTIGATION!!!!
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Male 3,982
kalron27 ~whistles nonchalantly and strolls off the stage~
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Male 444
squrlz4ever were the nuts really worth it?
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Male 5,427
thething911 Next week on CSI Pangea: The Case of the Rocky Squirrel
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Male 5,427
squrlz4ever ^^^^ WHISTLE BLOWER!!!! ^^^^
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Male 3,982
Thank God humans are no longer trying to live in trees. The opossums are bad enough.
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Male 2,902
squrlz4ever Hey, I feed the Possums as well as the Squirrels!  They are the Friendly Neighborhood Tick Eaters!!!  Along with the Skunks.
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Male 5,427
kalron27 Possums big tree rats, Skunks big mean cats with rabies and smelly butts
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Male 5,427
thezigrat That's why I feed my Squirrel, Rabbits and a groundhog
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Male 3,982
kalron27 Hmph. One might appreciate the opposums' tick-eating services more if they would just use some bodywash once in a while. Just sayin'. As for the skunks, I am happy to have them hoovering up ticks and maggots from the forest floor. And the little skunks are adorable, there's no gainsaying that.
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Male 5,427
squrlz4ever What about Rabbits, Hares and ground hogs?
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Male 3,982
thezigrat The politics of the woodlands are a complicated thing. You guys have Democrats, Republicans, and Libertarians. We have rodents, marsupials, carnivores, herbivores, mammals (hooved or clawed), arachnids, birds, you name it. It's... it's a jungle out here!

Here's a handy reference guide I've made to help sort things out.

CRITTERS OF THE WOODLAND: A LIST, GROUPED BY LIKEABILITY
By Horatio L. Squrlz

CRITTERS WE LIKE VERY MUCH
1. Chickadees. (Adorable and a great source for the latest woodland gossip. Just remember they can't keep a secret.)
2. Groundhogs
3. White-tailed deer
4. Black bears
5. Robins
6. Wood thrushes
7. Crows. (If it weren't for the crows, I might despair of ever having intelligent animal-to-animal conversations.)
8. Blue Jays
9. Cicadas. (Delicious, esp. with a dash of Old Bay seasoning.)
10. Rabbits
11. Skunks
12. Young human females with nice-smelling hair who make small party hats for us out of construction paper and glitter, feed us peanuts, and post our photos on Instagram

CRITTERS WE CAN TAKE OR LEAVE
1. Raccoons. (Do not ever trust anything a raccoon tells you. They are the con artists of the woodland.)
2. Chipmunks
3. Bobcats

CRITTERS WE DISLIKE
1. Opossums. (Again: bodywash. Thank you.)
2. Gophers
3. Starlings
4. Foxes
5. Feral cats
6. Mosquitos
7. Coyotes

CRITTERS WE REALLY, REALLY DISLIKE
1. Hawks
2. Owls generally, and Barred Owls in particular
3. Space gophers
4. Fleas
5. Humans who describe squirrels as "good eatin'"
6. That lady who walks her yapping dachsund around and around the base of my oak tree at 6:30 AM every morning
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Male 2,723
squrlz4ever what about sasquatches
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Male 3,982
rumham Squirrels may or may not have signed a non-disclosure agreement with the sasquatches. If sasquatches exist, which I can neither confirm nor deny, we are prevented from disclosing any information about them with humans, in consideration of tasty meat snacks, which they may or may not provide to the squirrel community on a regular basis.
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Male 2,723
squrlz4ever squirrel jerky?!?! makes me wonder about rumsquirel.
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36
squrlz4ever Bobcats?!?!
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Male 3,982
stevopusser I've known a few good bobcats. Others seem to have developed a taste for squirrel. Until some kind of a squirrel-bobcat treaty is signed, my policy is "Approach with Caution." Thus the neutral rating.

Oh, and welcome to IAB! Looks like you've been here awhile, but are only now finding a voice. Also... that is one sneaky generic non-generic avatar.

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Male 5,427
squrlz4ever I too have known a few good bobcats, It depends on the seasonings
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Male 5,427
squrlz4ever Where are the land cepalapods on your list such as the California tree octopus, Or the Mexican Desert Squid?
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Male 5,427
thezigrat The interesting thing about the Desert Squid is that its diet consists mainly of road runners and has been clocked at being able to silently pull itself along the ground at speeds in upwards of 55 miles per hour
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Male 5,427
thezigrat On  the other tentacle the Tree Octopus likes to live near human communities in California  and are shy and solitary creatures. These small (only getting to around 8" in diameter) unassuming creatures feed mainly on wolves, coyote,  and bears. Their hunting technique is unique in all the octopus world. They drop down on their prey from above,  wrestle  it to the ground where it strangles it. Then the octopus then drag their kill whole up its tree to feed on later. Often when seen by humans their kills are though to be made by Cougars or other large wild cats. They also can travel quickly from tree to tree by flinging them selves Frisbee like for a distance of 30 feet. The Tree Octopus has been found to be such an efficient hunter it has nearly decimated California of its panda and polar bear populations

Both the Land Squid and the octopus are almost never seen in nature due to their camouflaging ability
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