Two Babies, Just Face-Timing Each Other Like It's No Big Deal

Submitted by: fancylad 6 months ago in Funny

Bonus: No politics!
There are 7 comments:
Male 320
when my son was about that age, facing the ipad's camera, he'll chat with himself. We could then record him and when watching the video, he'd chat with himself. It became very convenient when he'd fuss as he'd always enjoy chatting with himself.
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Male 3,617
the look on the dogs face.
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Male 4,373
Omigosh. How will anyone be able to explain to this kid 15 years from now that there once was a time when telephones were connected with wires, weighed about 10 pounds, had rotary dials, and no video?
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Male 8,418
squrlz4ever Most kids today thing the telephone function of a smart phone is 'just another app that comes with the device that's we really don't use.'
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Male 4,373
megrendel LOL. So true! We are all being transformed by technology: we are technology, technology is us. I'd love to see a chart that shows the yearly gowth in human knowledge over the past 200 years. I remember not terribly long ago, someone made the claim that human knowledge (that is, the number of known facts about our bodies, other plants and animals, chemistry, the universe at large) was increasing something like 20% per year from the 1980s onward. I've got to think that the Internet has significantly increased that rate of growth.

For much of history, knowledge, such as it was, was conjecture and was passed on by word of mouth or fanciful treatises that contained no research (e.g., Herodotus's Histories). Here's a tidbit I just learned the other day: For a period of about 300 years, it was believed that every land animal had an ocean- or lake-dwelling counterpart. The hippopotamus, for example, was considered to be the water-based equivalent of the horse. Flying fish were the ocean-going equivalent of sparrows. This idea of land/ocen symmetry in the animal kingdom was one reason why the belief in mermaids took hold and was so persistent. There was a philosophical idea behind it all that meant that, logically, mermaids simply had to exist.

A similar fanciful idea that held sway for hundreds of years was that every tree's root system was a mirror image of the trunk and limbs you saw growing above ground.

It appears that hoomans have a real love of symmetry and when facts are unavailable, tend to create belief systems based on it. Yet another example: The idea of humors--wet/dry, cold/hot--and the belief that all human illness could be explained by their imbalance. Among other things, this led to the idea that blood-letting could be an important medical treatment. Still another symmetry-based idea in medicine was homeopathy--"like cures like"--which, incredibly, many people still believe in today. ~facepaw~
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Male 8,418
squrlz4ever Nice post.

Yes, the sum net of all human knowledge is increasing exponentially.  On an individual bases? Not so much. We no longer have to remember anything. When your reference material is in your pocket, why bother remembering.

I do, though, still find it funny to think back to when we asked our math teacher if we could use a calculator on a test. Her response, "Do you think you'll carry a calculator with you every where you go?"  Turns out, we do. 

But, it turns out, while we pick up in convenience we seem to be losing reasoning.
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Male 4,373
megrendel Thanks. I LOL'ed at your observation that all our high school math teachers had it wrong. So true! And yes, there's something peculiar going on here: collectively, we're getting much smarter, but not individually. I compare the typical analytical thinking skills I see today with even high school graduates of 50 years ago, and today's crop don't measure up that well.
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