Canadian Humourist, Writer Stuart McLean Dead at 68

Submitted by: punko 4 months ago in Entertainment


Not a household name for most of the globe, but Stuart McLean was a well known Canadian writer who had a traveling stage show called the Vinyl Cafe, where he would read stories that featured a fictitious family of Dave, Morley and their kids Sam and Stephanie (and Arthur the dog). He passed away today at 68.




There are 6 comments:
Male 14
i have watched such a lot of interviews of him and i have accompanied him on social networking web page. The custom assignment writer provider has written an editorial approximately him and i've regarded many things about his lifestyles fashion.
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Male 9
I have watched so many interviews of him and I have followed him on social networking site. The custom research paper writing service has written an article about him and I have known many things about his life style.
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Female 10
You have a very nice post and very amazing and clear
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Male 449
Thanks for the Post, Fancy.

My family had seen him and his travelling show many, many times.  My sons got on stage with him during various audience participation segments, and we all had a blast. 

When the radio show was on, we'd often sit in the driveway to hear the end of the particular story he was telling, if we were out and were listening on our way home.  We have many CD's and his books - its amazing how you can read his stories, and his particular voice and delivery would sound in your head.

He was a bit of a throwback talent - someone who could mesmerize an audience with simple stories of (almost) normal people.  He'd occasionally slip something topical into the stories - but always kept things light, warm, and positive.

His Remembrance Day story - a story of Dave discovering an old postcard from WWI and researching the sender and the history - always stirs the soul.

Sam's grade 8 trip to Quebec City, Dave's fascination with the neighborhood defibrillator, the story The Science Experiment, Stephanie's summer as a tree-planter up north, and Morley's adventures with a crazy book club, an out of control school Christmas pageant, all were funny, and well, real, somehow.

The story Morte D'Arthur that addressed how the family dealt with the passing of their faithful dog was a powerful piece.

I know this isn't IAB's standard fare, but this death hit my household hard. 

Thanks again, Fancyclad, for allowing the post.

Punko

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Male 20,305
punko The guy seems pretty facinating -- anyone who can tell stories and captivate an audience in this day and age is someone worth championing. He's one of the last of a dying breed of storytellers. 
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Male 449
punko  They were so young; they still thought life had a purpose; they still believed what they were doing was important. 
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