20 Kilos Of Yellow-Hot Steel Vs. Frozen Lake -- Who You Got?

Submitted by: squrlz4ever 3 months ago in Science


Twenty kilos of yellow-hot steel contain a lot of heat energy, but then a solid foot of ice requires a lot of energy to go through the phase changes from ice to water to steam. Will it penetrate? Place your predictions at the 1:30 mark in the comments. No cheating!
There are 21 comments:
Male 267
I enjoyed that slow-motion bit a little too much
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256
Hot, hot, hot, cold as fuck.

Needs to be made into a choon.
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Male 8
Damn, I bet on the hot steel.
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Male 2,335
saitek118 So did I. No worries; everyone's a winner who played this game because it was darned interesting. Welcome to IAB, by the way. I'm the First Squirrel. It isn't an official title, but I like to use it.
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Male 1,783
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Male 1,783
rumham adds nothing to the coversation but i thought it was funny
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Male 2,335
rumham That's quite all right. Squirrel memes are always welcome. :)
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Male 1,012
I was right about one thing...picking up on the accent as Finnish, even though the cadence of his speach patterns are, to my ears, more simialr to Swedish....
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Male 525
It failed, just like I thought it would, but I didn't think it would get that far through. Most if not all of the work is done by the bottom and heat rises so at some point the bottom was bound to cool enough to stop penetrating.


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Male 324
This was expected. although the hardest part was trying to guess air temp and temp profile of the ice to do the heat transfer calculations.
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Male 2,335
punko If you've done the calculations, I'd love to see them. I think this would make an awesome assignment for a high school physics class, with the final question being, "Calculate the minimum added mass (in kilograms, heated yellow-hot) that would need to be added to the weight to ensure that it melts through the ice." There are too many variables to have a very precise answer, but it would be a great exercise in logical thought.
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Male 324
squrlz4ever it would have melted through much quicker if the dolt would have bailed the meltwater out of the hole
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Male 302
That was a really hot video. Whoops! I meant to say that was a really cool video.
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Male 1,783
wellsy57 somewhere inbetween maybe?!
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Male 6,615
Going with it won't make it through.
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Male 6,615
normalfreak2 So wait, techincally did it make it through?  He had to prod it to push it through all the way.  
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Male 2,335
normalfreak2 That's what I loved about this video. By luck, the weight had very close to the exact amount of heat energy required to melt through that ice, which helped reveal a lot of factors affecting the outcome. 

1. Had the weight been left alone long enough, I'm fairly sure that it would have eventually gotten through the ice because most of the meltwater it was sitting in was so hot. As the male experimenter stated, the experiment had reached a point where the meltwater was doing as much or more melting than the weight itself.

2. I'm curious as to what would have happened if the meltwater had been removed by, say, a wet-vac during the experiment. On the one paw, less of the weight's energy would have been expended on turning the melted water into steam, so much more energy would have been available to melt the ice beneath it.

3. On the other paw, much of that meltwater was serving as an energy store for the weight; it was hot. By removing it from the system, you'd have been taking away a lot of heat energy before it had run its course.

4. I suppose the answer as to whether the weight penetrated the ice or not is one of interpretation: If the weight would have eventually fallen through the ice because the warm puddle of water it was sitting in eventually melted a hole in the ice, does that count? Or did "penetrate" mean that the weight itself had to be doing the melting all the way through at the contact point of metal and ice, with little or no help from the heat of the meltwater?

5. All that said, the objective report of what occurred has to be, NO: The weight failed to penetrate the ice. It only went through because the experimenter added his own energy, in the form of kinetic energy, into the equation by lifting and dropping the weight, which fractured the ice below the weight. What would have happened if the weight and the hot meltwater it was sitting in had been left undisturbed for a few hours is an unknown.
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Male 564
normalfreak2 That's what I was wondering.  I was guessing it would make it through, but I feel like I was still wrong.  It seems like everyone is wrong no matter what they chose, and also right.
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Male 1,783
normalfreak2 thats one frozen ass lake
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Male 1,783
i was gonna post this :P
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Male 2,335
rumham Sorry, Rumham. I've been there and I know it sucks. 
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