More UK Slang Vs. USA Words [Pic]

Submitted by: fancylad 1 year ago in Lifestyle
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There are 19 comments:
Male 707
So @Fancylad is british for Desire-boy? Cheeky..
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Male 584
oh shnit. im united states slang privileged
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Female 8,118
Much UK slang is regional.. add in stuff which come from your school (summer holiday or long vac for example, did you fag for your pre's or nosh for them) and it can almost be a different language if you move a county or so.
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Male 712
It's got some about right. But the translations aren't all that literal. There's not really any way to summarise the differences. I think Brits are a lot more accustomed to US stuff than vice versa, mainly because a lot of our entertainment comes from over your way. It's not about words so much as it is about general speech patterns and whatnot. And these aren't London phrases. These come from all over the isles. Like 'Radge' I think is Scottish. And a phrase like 'splash out' doesn't necessarily mean spending too much money as it does just spending money in general—depends on context entirely. Overall the huge difference between US and UK speech is that UK speech tends to have that baked-in self-deprecation to it that saturates the entire language; whereas US speech tends to be more literal, to the point, and proud. And I think that's why British comedy is so hit and miss over there, because there isn't that sort of vestigial—or maybe inherent—acknowledgement of that 'we're so rubbish at everything' attitude that's been part of our culture for centuries.
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Male 7,774
Never even heard of radge, don't know where you got that one. And I've never heard anyone use muffler instead of scarf. And, Gerry, dogs bollocks is right.
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Male 7,123
Drawman, radge or radgie is mostly a Geordie term. Probably from a Romany word. We also have the word gadgie from Romany which generally meand an uneducated and anti-social bloke. Which gives the term "Radgie gadgie".
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Male 4,253
It's a uniform, not a kit, a field, not a pitch and it's a cat for fucks sake, not a moggy.
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Male 1,055
No, it's a kit, not a uniform, it's a pitch, not a field, and it's a moggy, unless it smells like fish. Then, it's a pussy. bwaaaahhhaa!
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Male 4,253
Ha, good one! (And it's not football, it's soccer).
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Male 469
Since this is captioned - you sound like you're from London... Biscuit/cookie - yes, except the picture looks like a cookie to me, which we still call cookies. I.e. things with chocolate chips or hazelnuts in are still cookies. So we have biscuits and cookies specifically. You aren't going to hear anyone South of Birmingham calling any form of sandwich a 'butty' with the possible exception of putting chips/fries into a sandwich - the 'chip butty' is widely acknowledged if not widely eaten. Only Northerners would routinely call a sandwich a 'butty'. A muffler would be more like a thick (probably fluffy) thing you'd put or clip around your neck rather than what I and probably everyone would still call a scarf being a long relatively narrow strip of clothing that you might wrap several times around your neck for warmth. Oh, the other one that is a bit off is bugger. Bugger isn't usually an insult by itself. It is just an expression of frustration and annoyance - a rude upgrade on drat or blast that you wouldn't use in polite/formal company. Usage - You drop an egg on the floor. In annoyance you say to no-one in particular 'Oh bugger it!' It can be used as a very rude dismissal. Usage 'Bugger off. You can can use it as an insult but it is usually directed at the inanimate. For instance if you have just stripped the head of a screw 'The little bugger' would be giving you trouble.
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Male 7,123
Never heard anyone call a scarf a muffler.
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Female 8,118
Me neither... always a scarf.
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Male 1,055
@LordJim Mebbe it's more of a Northern / regional term? I'm 1st gen Aussie, parents and older siblings West Yorkshire born and bred (Halifax, specifically)...and I distinctly remember when I was young, my Gran calling a scarf a muffler.
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Male 7,123
I am familiar with the word but as an archaism. I've seen it written but never heard anyone actually use it. And I'm about as Northern as you can get.
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Male 4,253
That is funny, I used to hear older folks use muffler instead of scarf here in the US.
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Male 40,247
dogs bollocks = awesome.... I don't' think that's the right translation
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Male 325
Yeah. Similar to "the bee's knees."
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Male 1,055
As strange as it might sound, it's true.
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Male 41,116
Many years of watching "Brit Coms" On CBC or PBS let me know almost all of these :-)
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