8 Realities Incoming College Freshmen Can Expect And How To Avoid Every Frosh Pitfall

Submitted by: fancylad 4 weeks ago in Lifestyle

Freshman year of college: pretty exciting, right? It's also a huge first dose of freedom for a lot of you. While it's probably going to be one of the greatest time in your life thus far, a few mistakes can easily ruin the whole experience. Look for these 8 speed bumps, and avoid 'em.


8. You'll be lost in a sea of freshman and your professor will never know who you are.
Every fall, a new wave of bushy-tailed freshman wash ashore on the steps of big colleges and universities everywhere, and every fall these freshman become just a name and number to their professors. The one-on-one instruction of high school gets thrown out the window.
 
Solution
Visit your professors during their office hours. Suddenly you've gone from one of hundreds of faceless students in a huge lecture hall to the new kid that's showing a little extra effort, and jaded professors put names and eager faces together. Also, office hours are where you can discuss borderline grades and ask for extra credit assignments. Just don't suck up -- professors and their TAs can spot apple-polishers a mile away.


7. You'll be tempted to skip classes.
In high school, it wasn't easy to skip class. Unless you were Ferris Bueller, you had to go to school and be in your seat for every class. In college, the world is your oyster and you don"t have to go to that 8 a.m. "Intro to American Literature" if you don't want to. The problem is, once you skip one class, skipping additional classes gets easier.

Solution
Get out of bed and go to class, frosh. It's easier than trying to fill in the gaps and borrowing unreliable notes from your classmates. That said, if your professor takes an attendance grade, you have no say in the matter.


6. You'll regret jumping into that exclusive relationship.
I know, I know -- the heart wants what the heart wants, but your freshman year of college is going to be one of the busiest years of your life: Overwhelming workloads, new schedules, new friends, intimidating profs, new social life, and that list goes on. The last thing you need is the drama of a relationship closing you off from loads of new -- ahem -- "social opportunities."
 
Solution
Play it by ear -- keep your schedule open. Your school will have dozens of free-for-student events every week -- go to those. But what if you enter college and you left a significant other back home? Good luck. Most 17-year-olds have a hard time adapting to going off to college as they leave their S.O. back home. Ever heard of the Turkey Dump? It's what happens when a student returns home from college during Thanksgiving and breaks up with their high school significant other. There are exceptions to the rule, but these are very few and far between.
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There are 10 comments:
Female 9,494
8. This is true if you go to a large state universities. If you don't want to be just another person in the crowd, you can go to a smaller college or university if you prefer smaller class sizes. 

7. Agreed. Don't waste your money if you're not going to show up to class. Some classes even require you to show up. 

5.  Get what you need, not what you want. 

4. Go to Chegg.com. You can rent your books for the fraction of the price of your text book and can return your books for free.

I would also recommend to look up your roommates online before you meet with them on moving day. It gives you a chance to see what kind of person you will be rooming with and it give you a chance to figure out who is going to buy the mini-fridge, utensils, cleaning supplies, and whatever else you're planning to bring to the dorm.

Talking about dorms, the majority of them are extremely small. Don't look at the lists you find online as you will only need a fraction of stuff you think you need, and if you need something after you move in, there will probably a Target or Walmart near the campus to get whatever remaining items you need.
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Male 38,750
NINTH REALITY - You will not get a trophy just for being you.
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Male 7,899
Gerry1of1 Actually, in today's academia, they will.

This accomplishes exactly the opposite of preparing them for real life.
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Male 1,173
Don't choose that "History of Left-Handed Basket Weaving" (or other useless) major if you actually want a job in the real world.
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Male 442
Kids need to remember that their grades will go down.  If you worked your ass off and didn't get near perfect marks you will burn out horribly.  If you are like I was,  never worked too hard but got good marks from natural ability - you will still need to pull your shit together and your marks will still drop.

I went through engineering - 1/3 of my class was gone by Christmas 1st year.  Each successive year 1/3 didn't make it back. My graduating class was 66, against a frosh class of over 600.

But if you strive through it, you will rise to the occasion.  In my 4A term (1st term of 4th year) my average over 4 courses was 1% higher than any mark on any course I had prior to that term.

I graduated with a major and two minors - not at the top of my class, and not at the bottom.

As a note, I graduated in 1991, with no student debt and paying my way through.  I'm sure some things have changed since then, though.
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Male 7,899
Just remember: You're there for a degree. Not to party, not to be popular.  

Attend college like YOU'RE paying for it.
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Female 9,494
megrendel Agreed. You are paying to be their. Don't waste your money if you're not going to show up to class. 
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Male 238
megrendel Agreed. I hate movies/shows where half the time spent awake at university is about partying, and somehow managing to idolize this. It's basically like watching 14 year old teens thinking being mature is drinking a lot and having sex with anyone.
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Male 249
megrendel Studies are expensive. Be respectful to your paying parents: don't study too much.
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Male 185
megrendel OMG!  I TOTALLY agree with you (for once)!  I learned that very lesson the hard way.  I flunked out of Purdue my first year and when my Mom learned of it, she said I blew my one chance.  I had to pay on my own the rest of the way.  It took me 9 years, but I finally got that degree with no student loan debt.  That was probably the toughest and best lesson I have learned (so far).  
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