Oldest Star In Known Universe Found [Pic+]

Submitted by: 5cats 3 years ago in Science

SMSS J031300.36-670839.3 And it"s right close to Earth too! How neat is that?
There are 17 comments:
Male 37,888
@auburnjunky: I think our Sun started with iron in it, which came from previous supernovas. iirc it`s the nova itself, or the "last phase of a star`s life" which makes the heavy elements.

@TheZigRat: How would we know how old a planet is? :-? In another system I mean. We (mostly) know how old they are in our system.
That would be a very interesting thing to read!
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Male 5,183
Great Post, I have a link (somewhere ) about a planet that was found recently that was about 13 b years old orbiting a star that was only 6 billion years old it was captured after its original star novaed. Ill see if i can post it when i find it
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Male 10,339
I didn`t know our Sun was old enough to be making Iron yet.
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Male 6,722
<3 when 5Cats sticks to catgirls, anime, posts like this.
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Male 2,675
"Oldest Star In Known Universe Found"

Abe Vigoda?
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Male 37,888
Alpha Centauri AB
I just had to go look up how old it was :-)
(6 billion years, give or take a billion)

Our Sun
A youngster at 4.6 Billion years!
0.16% is Iron, just in case anyone was curious (like me!).

SMSS J0313 (wiki)
Oops! I got it`s age wrong below. It may be the oldest -thing- observed, ever! I thought it was just the oldest -star- we`ve found.
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Male 37,888
@OldOllie: The light from this star is 6,000 years old, but the star itself is 13.4 Billion years old (again, they think!).

iirc: the oldest "object" they`ve seen is 13.6 billion, some sort of Quasar? It was (back then) newly born, just like the entire Universe was! It probably ceased to exist ages ago, but we haven`t received that light yet, or lack of it ;-)
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Male 37,888
[quote]In all fairness, when he manages to stay away from Obama, guns and AGW, 5Cats submits some pretty good content.[/quote]
Thanks @Chalket :heart: Kind of you to mention it!

Actually? People have also complained about my cat posts, anime posts and "stupid" posts (which I thought were funny!) so the rule is:

You Cannot Please Everybody All The Time! Eh?

@OldOllie: Not really, it doesn`t work like that.
They`ve found "old, Phase 2 stars" before. Just not AS old and this one happens to be VERY close by!
iirc: most have been in other Galaxies...

The light shows what it`s made of: this one has NO iron in it, meaning it`s Phase 2. IDK how exactly they figure out it`s "exact" age, but distance has nothing to do with either thing.

Since it`s older than the Milky Way itself (they think) it`s very mysterious!
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Male 2,711
@normalfreak2: "Hey an submission by 5Cats that I like."

In all fairness, when he manages to stay away from Obama, guns and AGW, 5Cats submits some pretty good content.
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Male 15,832
First, it`s natural that the oldest stars would be nearby, because the farther out you look, the farther back in time you see. If all stars were created at the same time (they weren`t, but if they were), the oldest one would be our own sun (except that it`s too big and would probably have burned out by now), and the next oldest would be Proxima Centauri, which would appear to be ~4.24 years younger (since it`s ~4.24 ly away).


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Male 37,888
[quote]Hey an submission by 5Cats that I like.[/quote]
Lolz! It`s bound to happen, just by random chance @normalfreak2! Just click my Profile a scroll through, I`m 100% sure you`ll find some links you`ll really like!

@drawman61: There were (in theory) 3 distinct phases of "star making" since the BB. This star is apparently a "leftover" from Phase 2, made when the Universe was very young, yet somehow it didn`t burn out or blow up like trillions of it`s fellows did.

[quote] it may have simply been somewhere where there wasn`t much iron from previous super nova.[/quote]
It`s possible! As I understand it, this sort of thing is exceedingly rare. The coolest part is that it`s so "close" to us! Pretty easy to study, comparatively speaking.
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Male 6,722
I guess if you are strictly basing the observation based on the composition of the Star sure, but like with all things it could be wrong, it may have simply been somewhere where there wasn`t much iron from previous super nova.
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Male 2,670
Yes, drawman, there WILL be differences in the ages of stars after a Big Bang, because stars are formed when gasses coalesce and compress, and that happens all the time, not all at once.

Learn some basic science before you pontificate on stellar astronomy you ignoramus.
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Male 7,775
This claims are pointless. Who is going to argue with them? And if there was a big bang then one star is not going to be older than the rest.
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Male 6,722
Hey an submission by 5Cats that I like.
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Male 2,670
Suck it, Young Earth Creationist morons.
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Male 37,888
Link: Oldest Star In Known Universe Found [Pic+] [Rate Link] - SMSS J031300.36-670839.3 And it`s right close to Earth too! How neat is that?
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