The best in arts & entertainment, news, pop culture, and your mom since 2002.

[Total: 10    Average: 4.3/5]
41 Comments - View/Add
Hits: 5879
Rating: 4.3
Category:
Date: 03/19/14 12:30 PM

41 Responses to World War Tea – English Vs American Tea [Pic]

  1. Profile photo of Mazztek
    Mazztek Male 40-49
    586 posts
    March 19, 2014 at 11:12 am
    Link: World War Tea - English Vs American Tea - The tea in Boston harbor was cold. Just sayin`.
  2. Profile photo of BostonKaiser
    BostonKaiser Male 40-49
    1185 posts
    March 19, 2014 at 12:43 pm
    Nasty stuff.
  3. Profile photo of DuckBoy87
    DuckBoy87 Male 18-29
    3286 posts
    March 19, 2014 at 12:44 pm
    I didn`t realize that iced tea was a foreign concept.
  4. Profile photo of Grendel
    Grendel Male 40-49
    6267 posts
    March 19, 2014 at 1:02 pm
    The proper way to make Sweet Iced Tea.

    Place four (4) family sized tea bags-



    into a tea kettle.



    Set on stove (gas preferably) and ALMOST bring to a boil.

    Turn off stove and let tea bags steep for half a day.

    Put appropriate amount of sugar into tea pitcher. Pour tea over sugar. Re-fill kettle with hot water, and pour into pitcher. Continue process until pitcher is full. Stir to desolve sugar.

    Serve over ice. Tea should be dark, sweet and cold.



    Note: Lemons have no place in Sweet tea.
  5. Profile photo of Grendel
    Grendel Male 40-49
    6267 posts
    March 19, 2014 at 1:02 pm
    Note: In some of them Yankee type restaurants, they DO NOT HAVE Sweet tea. They will bring you a glass of iced unsweetened tea *shudder*.

    As it is impossible to properly sweeten iced unsweet tea using sugar (it doesn`t desolve), just asked the waiter for some Simple-Syrup. Works much better.

    Another possibility is to order tea-no-ice and a seperate glass of ice. Sweeten the warm tea, then pour over ice.
  6. Profile photo of McGovern1981
    McGovern1981 Male 30-39
    14268 posts
    March 19, 2014 at 1:04 pm
    Tea times for little girls and old women those with important things to do drink coffee. I expect none the less from the pretentious brits.
  7. Profile photo of DuckBoy87
    DuckBoy87 Male 18-29
    3286 posts
    March 19, 2014 at 1:28 pm
    @MeGrendel, I live about a 40 minute drive north of the Mason-Dixon line, and at most restaurants they have three kinds of iced tea. Unsweetened, sweet, and premade garbage (Lipton).

    I actual hate sweet tea and if I want some sugar in my tea I`ll take half a glass of sweet tea and a half glass of unsweetened tea to get it to my preferred sweetness level. Of course, I`ll drink iced tea without any sugar at all, and I`m just fine with that.
  8. Profile photo of Grendel
    Grendel Male 40-49
    6267 posts
    March 19, 2014 at 1:39 pm
    @DuckBoy87

    I wasn`t dissing Unsweet tea. Everyone has different tastse (the old `peanut butter vs. mayo on a banana sandwich` debate).

    Just my opinion on how to make Sweet tea. Obviously, if everyone liked sweet it`d be in more restaurants.
  9. Profile photo of madduck
    madduck Female 50-59
    7612 posts
    March 19, 2014 at 2:08 pm
    Every time I go over to the US I have to take so many tea bags I run out of luggage space. Then I end up teaching people how to make proper builders tea. I don`t like tea, I drink coffee...
  10. Profile photo of mikesex
    mikesex Male 60-69
    119 posts
    March 19, 2014 at 2:10 pm
    McGovern getting it wrong as usual. In UK, tea drunk by the working class, coffee by the middle class.
    Nothing to do with gender.
  11. Profile photo of abby0315
    abby0315 Female 30-39
    1248 posts
    March 19, 2014 at 2:27 pm
    I like both hot tea and slightly sweetened iced tea. I still want to taste the actual tea when I drink it.
  12. Profile photo of CaptKangaroo
    CaptKangaroo Male 50-59
    2347 posts
    March 19, 2014 at 2:30 pm
    I like cold tea- no sugar- with a lime slice. And I live in the South... ish.
    At restaurants, after ordering tea this way, I always have to check to make sure that it`s not that throat-choking, give-you-diabetes sweet stuff.
    Gak!
  13. Profile photo of SavageChef
    SavageChef Female 50-59
    2692 posts
    March 19, 2014 at 3:08 pm
    Uh, Madduck? U.S. stores sell tea bags.
  14. Profile photo of FredSpudman
    FredSpudman Male 18-29
    653 posts
    March 19, 2014 at 3:22 pm
    @mikesex both tea and coffee transcend class as well as gender.
  15. Profile photo of FredSpudman
    FredSpudman Male 18-29
    653 posts
    March 19, 2014 at 3:23 pm
    @McGovern "I expect none the less from the pretentious brits." Come on dear boy, try and use the language we bequeathed unto you.
  16. Profile photo of FredSpudman
    FredSpudman Male 18-29
    653 posts
    March 19, 2014 at 4:03 pm
    @mikesex both tea and coffee transcend class as well as gender.
  17. Profile photo of QueenZira
    QueenZira Female 18-29
    2228 posts
    March 19, 2014 at 4:17 pm
    I`m afraid the Ruskies have us all beat, they have an unusually bitter tea (forget the name) that`s too much for the liver to handle in large doses and can kill you. Because Russia.

    Additionally, a story from down Texas way, a waiter set out iced sweet tea for a group of visiting Brits and watched in horror as everyone took a sip and promptly spat out the offending beverage in seconds flat. When asking why they didn`t enjoy it they replied. "We thought it was some kind of soft drink, it certainly wasn`t tea of any kind." XD



  18. Profile photo of romapenn
    romapenn Female 18-29
    92 posts
    March 19, 2014 at 5:04 pm
    I dont much like McD`s, but I LOVE their sweet tea. Portion control. Portion control.
  19. Profile photo of Angilion
    Angilion Male 40-49
    12387 posts
    March 19, 2014 at 5:42 pm
    They`ve shot themselves in this "tea temperature war" by citing ancient China as the ultimate authority on tea. The ancient Chinese, unsurprisingly, had their tea hot. They also shot themselves with their underlying argument, namely that authority with tea rests on the length of time for which it`s been drunk in your country. That would make England more of an authority than the USA. It would also make hot tea far more correct than iced tea, as hot tea (of some kind, not necessarily with the modern tea plant) is prehistoric and iced tea is <150 years old.

    So their argument is total rubbish. A much better argument is that the right way to make tea is the way you like it. Make it with warm yak`s wee if you want to - that would be the right way for you. And there`s probably a website for people into it :)
  20. Profile photo of Listypoos
    Listypoos Male 40-49
    3069 posts
    March 19, 2014 at 7:12 pm
    "Tea times for little girls and old women those with important things to do drink coffee. I expect none the less from the pretentious brits."

    Tea times? Is that like an Oirish three times table? Or do you think, you know using the Queen`s English and all, that you meant to shorten the phrase `Tea time is` in which case you were missing some good old English punctuation, you heathen drater.
  21. Profile photo of Gerry1of1
    Gerry1of1 Male 50-59
    36859 posts
    March 19, 2014 at 7:19 pm

    Iced tea was invented in 1904. How is it no one thought to drink it cold all those centuries it was around before then?
  22. Profile photo of Ani187
    Ani187 Female 30-39
    4448 posts
    March 19, 2014 at 7:23 pm
    For hot tea, I like a good oolong with a spoon of honey. For iced tea, I want it just a bit sweet, absolutely no lemon or raspberry. Actually, I really like peach Snapple. Wait! Does this mean they don`t have Snapple in England?
  23. Profile photo of Listypoos
    Listypoos Male 40-49
    3069 posts
    March 19, 2014 at 7:33 pm
    " I like a good oolong with a spoon of honey"

    Is that some sort of euphemism dear?
  24. Profile photo of Ani187
    Ani187 Female 30-39
    4448 posts
    March 19, 2014 at 9:15 pm
    It is now, Listy. It is now. ;-)
  25. Profile photo of sutra46
    sutra46 Female 40-49
    2550 posts
    March 19, 2014 at 9:17 pm
    The English got their tea from India not from China.
    No Chinese tea is taken with milk and sugar.
  26. Profile photo of madduck
    madduck Female 50-59
    7612 posts
    March 20, 2014 at 12:22 am
    just for the record- yes, you can buy a kind of tea bag in the US- but you cannot make builders tea with it.
  27. Profile photo of mikesex
    mikesex Male 60-69
    119 posts
    March 20, 2014 at 1:56 am
    @FredSpudman

    You`re broadly right of course, but when you`re dealing with McGovern you need to keep it really REALLY simple. He`s not too good with facts.
  28. Profile photo of Nickel2
    Nickel2 Male 50-59
    5879 posts
    March 20, 2014 at 3:04 am
    I have consumed hot tea in many countries, nearly all of them without milk. (-UK).
    The only tea to drink cold is Long Island iced tea, mixed by a properly trained bar-tender.
  29. Profile photo of Musuko42
    Musuko42 Male 18-29
    2850 posts
    March 20, 2014 at 4:28 am
    @Gerry1of1

    "Iced tea was invented in 1904. How is it no one thought to drink it cold all those centuries it was around before then?"

    I don`t care enough to look into it, but I`d hazard a hypothesis: that sounds about the right kind of year to match up nicely with the widespread availability of inexpensive ice via electric refridgeration.
  30. Profile photo of LemonCurry
    LemonCurry Male 40-49
    1106 posts
    March 20, 2014 at 6:19 am
    The English got their tea from India not from China.
    No Chinese tea is taken with milk and sugar.
    --------------
    historically incorrect. tea does come from china, and the british pilfered the plants and started growing them in their colony india to break the chinese monopoly on tea.
  31. Profile photo of LemonCurry
    LemonCurry Male 40-49
    1106 posts
    March 20, 2014 at 6:23 am
    the whole "x did it first" argument is such nonsense, though. who cares who did it first, and how they did it.

    cocoa was first consumed in latin america brewed in water with chili powder added. interesting, but i still prefer a nice cup of van houten, brewed with milk and sugar.

    beer might come from egypt originally, but take a quick look at egypt and the u.s. today and tell me which country has more exciting choices ...
  32. Profile photo of LemonCurry
    LemonCurry Male 40-49
    1106 posts
    March 20, 2014 at 6:26 am
    lol, and frankly, how can you call tea bags "proper tea"? brrr, good tea for me is always loose leaf tea.
  33. Profile photo of McGovern1981
    McGovern1981 Male 30-39
    14268 posts
    March 20, 2014 at 7:31 am
    Come on dear boy, try and use the language we bequeathed unto you.

    Thanks for supporting the original statement.

    McGovern getting it wrong as usual. In UK, tea drunk by the working class, coffee by the middle class.

    Say whaaaa? Working class isn`t middle class at all? Lets talk about getting things wrong.....

    Tea times? Is that like an Oirish three times table? Or do you think, you know using the Queen`s English and all, that you meant to shorten the phrase `Tea time is` in which case you were missing some good old English punctuation, you heathen drater.

    Wow ya a missing apostrophe you must be a wise one if you need to discern the meaning of words.... Back to that original statement thanks for proving my point.

    These little girls get quite upset when you knock their little tea parties. Did you miss that whole world war tea theme?
  34. Profile photo of kree_
    kree_ Male 30-39
    1062 posts
    March 20, 2014 at 7:42 am
    Why do people use a tea bag in a mug? Isn`t that wasting tea? A tea bag is meant for an entire pot.
  35. Profile photo of FredSpudman
    FredSpudman Male 18-29
    653 posts
    March 20, 2014 at 8:04 am
    @McGovern If you think that people correcting you is pretentious, then yes, I think the British are a pretentious bunch. But by the same token, plenty of North Americans could be said to be as well.
  36. Profile photo of Angilion
    Angilion Male 40-49
    12387 posts
    March 20, 2014 at 8:33 pm
    Why do people use a tea bag in a mug? Isn`t that wasting tea? A tea bag is meant for an entire pot.

    Perhaps you have bigger teabags in the USA or you like your tea weaker.

    Over here, a teabag is the right amount for a mug of tea. More than one would be used for a teapot (how many would depend on the size of the teapot).

    In some cases, you might use 2 teabags in one mug, if you have a very large mug and like strong tea. Yorkshire comes to mind - tea strong enough to stand the spoon in and mugs that hold half a pint or more.
  37. Profile photo of Angilion
    Angilion Male 40-49
    12387 posts
    March 20, 2014 at 8:39 pm
    beer might come from egypt originally

    I`m almost sure that the oldest known beer is Sumerian, but it`s not proven where it came from originally because beer is prehistoric. We only know about the Sumerian beer because it was carved on a piece of stone that was discovered by archaeologists in modern times.
  38. Profile photo of Angilion
    Angilion Male 40-49
    12387 posts
    March 20, 2014 at 8:47 pm
    The English got their tea from India not from China.

    Not originally. Tea became very commonplace in England when it was grown in India, but it was originally obtained from China. Given how badly England acted to get tea from China (massive scale drug running followed by outright war), I expect English businessmen simply stole tea plants or seeds from China in order to grow tea in India.
  39. Profile photo of Angilion
    Angilion Male 40-49
    12387 posts
    March 20, 2014 at 8:56 pm
    Iced tea was invented in 1904.

    It was invented before then, sometime in the mid-late 1800s. There are recipes from the 1870s.

    It became widespread in 1904 because that was when it was sold to the public on a fairly large scale and got media coverage.

    How is it no one thought to drink it cold all those centuries it was around before then?

    i) It`s made hot, so people thought of it as a hot drink.

    ii) Ice wasn`t generally reliably available at a reasonable cost until the invention of artificial refridgeration at a reasonable cost, which was ~1900.
  40. Profile photo of kree_
    kree_ Male 30-39
    1062 posts
    March 20, 2014 at 10:29 pm
    Angilion, I am currently in the states, but I am originally from the Netherlands. I assumed the bag in a cup thing was an American habit and am surprised to find it is common in England as well.
  41. Profile photo of mikesex
    mikesex Male 60-69
    119 posts
    March 21, 2014 at 1:56 pm
    @ McGovern

    RICH HALL, a US stand-up comic, explained: when you go to work in the morning, if your name is on the front of the building, you`re upper class; if your name is on your desk, you`re middle class; and if your name is on your shirt, you`re working class.

Leave a Reply