Smoking Gun Evidence Of Big Bang [Pic+]

Submitted by: patchgrabber 2 years ago Science

Evidence of gravitational waves confirms early universe inflation in addition to already known current expansion.
There are 26 comments:
Male 4,893

McGovern - NO, You DON`T UNDERSTAND IT. You don`t even understand how you can`t understand it.

You may understand bad, oversimplified, horrible metaphors.. You do NOT understand the science, math, and concepts.

Sorry. I like you. I agree with a lot of your views, and love how you F with the europussies...but it is clear, from what you say, that you don`t understand the science.
Please don`t use reality to explain the supernatural (aka nonsense)

Untill religion is willing to change based on evidence (like science) don`t use science to explain your beliefs.
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Male 14,330
[quote]Say "God". I dare you.[/quote]

Triple dog dare accepted! GOD GOD GOD!! This thread will now morph into dark matter!
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Male 14,330
@gpig07

Well there you have it you even said it yourself it answers nothing only make another question.

@turdburglar

Problem is I do understand it. All it does is make another question how does the dot that contains all of the universe come to be and for some reason explode? But keep using it to preach exactly like what you criticize. No one can will ever know the answer to the eternal question that`s what makes evangelicals so similar.
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Male 5,970
This is great. Science keeps finding out new things about our universe! Now if we could get everyone else on board we can start doing some more amazing things.
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Male 5,811
[quote]Just because there are waves on our oceans doesn`t prove the initial source of those waves. [/quote]
The waves confirm what Einstein hypothesized and Andrei Linde, co-founder of the inflation theory also hypothesized. These gravitational waves are products of rapid inflation. They have r=0.2 at 5 sigma...it doesn`t get much better than that in stats for the cosmos.

Also I`d like to point out that the Big Bang wasn`t a speck, the universe wasn`t small at all, just smaller than it is now. The expansion didn`t happen at one point but all over. All the term "singularity" means in math is that the math can`t describe it properly. But this was something like 10^-34 seconds after the Bang, which is about as close as we can get since the equations don`t work at t=0.
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Male 1,243
The idea of a god isn`t all that bad, it`s just the religious baggage that comes with it.
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Male 4,431
Zismo, that`s precisely the questions that these measurements are helping provide answers. Well, okay, in this case it`s the "how, precisely?" since we already know the "what".
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Male 958
http://youtu.be/GGIen0Pp7TQ
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Male 1,983
So, Gpig07, you think it is possible for "an all knowing, all powerful, omnipresent deity [to be] manifested from nothing" but it is *NOT* possible for a universe to be manifested from nothing.

Wow. Major failure in logic there, dude.
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Male 1,056
The real question is: What banged?
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Male 14,775
Say "God". I dare you.
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Male 4,893

Don`t try to interpret science you don`t even slightly understand, and FFS don`t try to use science you don`t understand to support your religion.

Science demands evidence. Those who seek evidence are also the most skeptical. Science loves being found wrong because it leads to new questions, answers, and progress.

ORGANIZED Religion is the opposite. It punishes those who question. Growth is discouraged. Skepticism is replaced with blind faith. When something doesn`t seem right, IT doesn`t search for answers, IT asks us to stop searching and have "faith".

Have religion. Go ahead. Just don`t use science you don`t comprehend to justify it.
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Male 292
Kewl !
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Male 4,431
I don`t care if a god caused the Big Bang, if it happened spontaneously, or if it was the beginning of the next phase of a cycle that`s been repeating forever. Hell, it could have been some enormously giant kid`s science project. What do I know?

I don`t believe in a god(s), but I don`t care if anyone else does. What I do find exceedingly cool is that these observations point directly toward "inflation", a concept that speaks to how all matter expanded from a single, super dense, infinitesimally small origin, in an amount of time about 10^-35 of a second long (in other words, a SUPER short amount of time) several billion years ago. I think that`s amazingly super wonderful and beautiful. And, in fact, because it can be measured, observed, tested, etc., by anyone who wants to do so, I reckon it can teach us a lot more than imagining the other origin possibilities I mentioned.
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Male 16
"BoredFrank both start with nothing and from that comes something Only stupid people can`t see the similarity.... See how that argument works?"

Yeah they both start in a similar manner, but really which is more likely, a single point of extremely dense matter expanding rapidly... OR a omniscient, omnipresent, omnipotent god right off the bat. A god who creates the universe and then talks to a bunch of scientific-illiterate sand people six thousand years ago, then disappears from the observable universe forever.

In both scenarios you have something that comes from nothing, this is true, but which something-from-nothing is really more likely?
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Male 152
"These inflation waves actually throw the whole "Big Bang" theory into a new realm...
...Space is not a completely pure vacuum...
...I`d be surprised if waves weren`t found, they seem to be universal in more ways than one. "

No offense man, but don`t you think the people whose job it is to find this stuff would know what to look for? and what to eliminate? Besides, it pretty much says that finding these fluctuations would confirm a rapid expansion, pretty much confirming a "big bang."
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Male 17,512
These inflation waves actually throw the whole "Big Bang" theory into a new realm. They don`t prove or disprove anything. Just because there are waves on our oceans doesn`t prove the initial source of those waves.

Space is not a completely pure vacuum, it contains areas of dense gas, high gravity, and explosive force. I`d be surprised if waves weren`t found, they seem to be universal in more ways than one.
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Male 2,578
I would really like to know more about why/how existence exists in the first place, and why the laws of physics are rather orderly. It doesn`t have to be that way. Why does something exist, rather than nothing? These questions straddle both Physics and Philosophy, though.

Sorry Evangelical Atheists, this talk usually makes you upset.
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Male 14,330
BoredFrank both start with nothing and from that comes something Only stupid people can`t see the similarity.... See how that argument works?
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Male 2,670
The stories are not at all similar.

One is bullpoo Stone Age mythology, and the other is hard-core physics.

Only stupid people can`t see the difference.
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Male 1,497
You cannot see gravity but it`s there. Same argument.
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Male 37,893

Add this to the list of things Texas will no teach in school.
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Male 14,330
[quote]It seems more likely that an all knowing, all powerful, omnipresent deity manifested from nothing and created the entire universe. Idiots.[/quote]

Funny thing is they`re kind of similar stories.
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Male 16
It seems more likely that an all knowing, all powerful, omnipresent deity manifested from nothing and created the entire universe. Idiots.
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Male 32
Prove it. Doesn`t anyone else find it odd that everything we can see (including other galaxies billions of light years away) all came from a speck?

Nah.
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Male 5,811
Link: Smoking Gun Evidence Of Big Bang [Pic+] [Rate Link] - Evidence of gravitational waves confirms early universe inflation in addition to already known current expansion.
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