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Why Is Glass Transparent?

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It might seem silly since we encounter glass every day and you are reading this through a layer of glass right now.

[Total: 13    Average: 3.5/5]
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Rating: 3.5
Category: Misc
Date: 02/16/14 11:15 AM

13 Responses to Why Is Glass Transparent?

  1. Profile photo of ElectricEye
    ElectricEye Male 50-59
    2729 posts
    February 15, 2014 at 2:53 pm
    Link: Why Is Glass Transparent? - It might seem silly since we encounter glass every day and you are reading this through a layer of glass right now.
  2. Profile photo of Jake_Justus
    Jake_Justus Male 50-59
    7033 posts
    February 16, 2014 at 11:32 am

    Reminds me of a line from an old Donovan song, "Surely you must know a looking-glass is made from sand."
  3. Profile photo of normalfreak2
    normalfreak2 Male 18-29
    3878 posts
    February 16, 2014 at 11:33 am
    I`m a big fan of the Ted talks and ted stuff. Good video.
  4. Profile photo of patchouly
    patchouly Male 40-49
    4746 posts
    February 16, 2014 at 12:02 pm
    You`re batting a thousand on your posts lately, ElectricEye! Keep em` coming man!
  5. Profile photo of icdumbpeople
    icdumbpeople Male 30-39
    177 posts
    February 16, 2014 at 12:06 pm
    Yay glass.
  6. Profile photo of Angilion
    Angilion Male 40-49
    12387 posts
    February 16, 2014 at 1:10 pm
    People who found this video interesting might like the Sixty Symbols channel on Youtube. the name stems from the fact that it was originally intended to be a series of short videos of scientists explaining a symbol used in science - what it means, why it`s interesting to them and so on - but it`s continued as a science channel. There`s loads of good stuff on it.

    Sixty Symbols channel

    Over 200 videos and there are related channels from the same person who films Sixty Symbols (Brady Haran).

    One of the most viewed videos on Sixty Symbols is about why some materials are transparent:

    Professor Moriarty`s explanation of transparency

    No joke. His surname really is Moriarty and he really is a profess
  7. Profile photo of ZackDark
    ZackDark Male 18-29
    299 posts
    February 16, 2014 at 1:21 pm
    I`m pretty sure there is no glass between me and the pixels on my screen right now...
  8. Profile photo of Angilion
    Angilion Male 40-49
    12387 posts
    February 16, 2014 at 1:43 pm
    I`m pretty sure there is no glass between me and the pixels on my screen right now...

    What type of screen do you have? LCD is the most common and I think LCD monitors still use glass either side of the liquid crystal.
  9. Profile photo of Kaagan
    Kaagan Male 18-29
    1599 posts
    February 16, 2014 at 2:36 pm
    uh infrared cant pass through glass either and its less energetic than visible and much less energetic then ultraviolet.
  10. Profile photo of Nickel2
    Nickel2 Male 50-59
    5879 posts
    February 16, 2014 at 3:01 pm
    If infra red did not pass through glass, those telecoms people have made a dreadful mistake choosing the stuff for fiber-optic transmission systems.
  11. Profile photo of Gerry1of1
    Gerry1of1 Male 50-59
    36663 posts
    February 16, 2014 at 4:51 pm

    oooooo.... sciencie stuff!

    kewel!
  12. Profile photo of MalcomR
    MalcomR Male 50-59
    79 posts
    February 16, 2014 at 5:12 pm
    That`s well done. Now here`s an even more fun question: Why does glass partially reflect some small amount of photons? (check out Feynman`s little book "QED: The Strange Theory of Light and Matter" for the answer. It`s a great down-to-earth explanation of the overall behavior of light).
  13. Profile photo of MalcomR
    MalcomR Male 50-59
    79 posts
    February 16, 2014 at 5:30 pm
    The term "infrared" covers wavelengths from thousands of nanometers (think body heat) to about 700nm, which is just below visible red. The light used to transmit data in many devices via fiber optics or free-space optics, as Nickel2 pointed out, work up in the nearly visible range around 710nm to 1100nm. So yeah, IR easily passes through glass.

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