Cruise Ship Stretched

Submitted by: ElectricEye 3 years ago Misc
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You"ve seen stretched limos, but never seen stretched cruise liners. Time lapse video of a 99ft extension.
There are 15 comments:
Male 2,711
My pleasure, Squrlz, do we get free acorns?
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Male 6,227
@ Mr_Ike and Chalket: Good info from both of you; thanks!
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Male 2,675
Geez, I can`t even imagine how hard that had to be to design when you figure that every single pipe, duct, conduit, hall, wall, floor, ceiling ... EVERYthing had to go in one side of the "addition" and come out in the exact same spot (ie one side of the cut to the other).
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Male 2,711
@freddyferret

Much more than "a few more rooms," they added 186 passenger cabins and 53 crew cabins, raising passenger capacity by more than a third (from 1230 to 1778).
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Male 186
Continued:

A ship that has reached it`s economical end of life can be made profitable (and thus given a new Economical end of Life) by giving it a stretch and retrofit. Thus the ship can be used again until it again reaches EEoL and is replaced or until it reaches its mechanical EoL

It`s also possible the ship had been bought by a new company, as it had reached EEoL at the original company and was replaced. Buying a used ship and stretching it would be cheaper than getting a completely new one build for a smaller company.

There`s several shipyards across the world specialized in exactly this sort of thing. Most ships are even designed with a midlife upgrade in mind afaik! There is a good chance that the center section had already been designed with the ship.
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Male 186
Anything machine has 2 different definitions of "end of life", be it a ship, a car, a nuclear reactor or a lathe. The is the mechanical end of life and the economical end of life. Mechanical end of life means the mechanics are too worn to keep using the device. (repair costs exceed the cost of just outright replacing)
Economic end of life means the device in it`s current form is more expensive to keep running as the returns in comparison to a newer device are too small. (ie. a new ship is bigger, more economic, houses more guests, whatever and thus generates more revenue per trip)

If you look closely you will notice there is also a LOT of activity going on inside the ship. I suspect it`s getting more than just a stretch. It`s also getting a complete retrofit to upgrade the interior fittings to modern standards.
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Male 6,227
@ Freddy: Good point and good question. It`s hard to understand how you could get a decent return on the investment. The thing that really surprised me about it was that I got the sense from the video somehow that for the shipyard, it was no big deal.

I guess I really know next-to-nothing about what they do in shipyards and what the equipment is capable of.
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Male 11,740
Why? It added a few more rooms but was it really a big deal? For the expense involved it will take a lot of cruises with those rooms filled to cover the cost.
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Male 6,227
Wow. I`m amazed that they could do that. I wouldn`t have thought it was possible.
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Male 15,832
Pretty f***in` awesome. They had to have planned for this in the original design.
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Male 13,624
Thats one hell of a cut n shut job
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Female 4,349
weird but cool
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Male 82
Neat. Thanks
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Male 7,031

That is amazing. Good post.
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Male 2,729
Link: Cruise Ship Stretched [Rate Link] - You`ve seen stretched limos, but never seen stretched cruise liners. Time lapse video of a 99ft extension.
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