A View From Mars Less Than 24 Hrs Ago

Submitted by: Squrlz4Sale 3 years ago in Science

Just a reminder that the Curiosity images are coming in daily and available from NASA online. Link in credits.
There are 21 comments:
Male 6,227
@ 747Pilot: My pleasure. I love discussing just about anything NASA-related.

GO, TEAM!

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Male 1,454
Good post thanks Squirlz, i was looking for this kind of thing for a while
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Male 6,227
(Cont`d)

Just think about that for a minute. Can you imagine not only putting a rover on the surface of Mars, but also putting satellites in orbit around the planet to handle communications to and from Earth by shuttling data to and from the rover as they pass over it in the Martian sky?

Not only designing this system, but building it and sending it through space 50 million miles away--and getting it to work perfectly?

I am in awe of what the NASA engineers have pulled off.
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Male 6,227
(Cont`d)

[quote]Mars is rotating on its own axis so Mars often "turns its back" to Earth, taking the rover with it. The rover is turned out of the field of view of Earth and goes "dark," just like nighttime on Earth, when the sun goes out of the field of view of Earth at a certain location when the Earth turns its "back" to the sun. The orbiters can see Earth for about 2/3 of each orbit, or about 16 hours a day. They can send much more data direct-to-Earth than the rovers, not only because they can see Earth longer, but because they can operate their radio for much longer since their solar panels get light most of the time, and they have bigger antennas than the rovers.[/quote]
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Male 6,227
More info for the curious:

The process of getting these Mars images to Earth isn`t easy or simple, to say the least. Here`s now NASA describes it:

[quote]The data rate direct-to-Earth varies from about 12,000 bits per second to 3,500 bits per second (roughly a third as fast as a standard home modem). The data rate to the orbiters is a constant 128,000 bits per second (4 times faster than a home modem). An orbiter passes over the rover and is in the vicinity of the sky to communicate with the rovers for about eight minutes at a time, per sol. In that time, about 60 megabits of data (about 1/100 of a CD) can be transmitted to an orbiter. That same 60 megabits would take between 1.5 and 5 hours to transmit direct to Earth. The rovers can only transmit direct-to-Earth for at most three hours a day due to power and thermal limitations, even though Earth may be in view much longer.[/quote]
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Male 2,675
The "Red Planet" ... is gray ... I feel so used.
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Male 6,227
GERRY! Now you`ve done it. You`re gonna get the whole darned IAB peanut gallery going. *sigh*
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Male 39,890

Oh sure. It` s \\ M A R S //
Not the California desert that looks exactly like that.
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Male 5,872
@bdowner60 - N Yemen desert, spot on. I did a job in Sana`a in 1983 and spent time up in the mountains. The desert either side of the Dhamar road looks identical to the martian surface, right down to the colours.
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Male 6,098
If it wasn`t for the cold, It reminds me of home
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Male 593
Looks like some places I have worked in Somalia or possibly Yemen!
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Male 6,227
@ Icdumbpeople: "That white rock front and center has some curious markings on it."

Yes, yes--I see what you mean. Let me zoom in and run it through my image processing software to see if I can bring out more detail.

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Male 6,227
@ MelCervini: Did you ever see the image below, titled "Curiosity Killed the Cat"? Gerry introduced me to it here on IAB and it still makes me laugh. *Mrrrreeeeeeeew!*

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Male 6,227
@ Maggierose78: I agree 100%--with a chief distinction being that the canyons and mountains found on Mars are deeper and higher than anything found on Earth.
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Male 6,227
@ Mikeoxsbiggg: Personally, I`m a lot more interested in a planet that we`ll be colonizing in the near future than a small, cold moon that may--may--have some blind marine worms eking out an existence around some thermal vents and that will probably never be worth colonizing.
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Female 4,402
*ding ding ding* let the photoshopping begin!!!!!
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Male 177
That white rock front and center has some curious markings on it.
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Male 7,031

We must keep searching. Who knows what`s out there?

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Female 688
It looks like the Nevada desert or maybe Arizona
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Male 1,497
I`m honestly more interested in Europa.
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Male 6,227
Link: A View From Mars Less Than 24 Hrs Ago [Rate Link] - Just a reminder that the Curiosity images are coming in daily and available from NASA online. Link in credits.
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