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Category: Science
Date: 12/20/13 02:54 PM

27 Responses to Can A Magnet Levitate A Grown Man? Crush His Hand?

  1. Profile photo of ElectricEye
    ElectricEye Male 50-59
    2729 posts
    December 20, 2013 at 8:30 am
    Link: Can A Magnet Levitate A Grown Man? Crush His Hand? - Down here we all float. Seriously, how do they work?
  2. Profile photo of Gerry1of1
    Gerry1of1 Male 50-59
    36648 posts
    December 20, 2013 at 3:03 pm

    PRESS || - He`s got he polarities reversed so they repell, right? PRESS >

    Yep.
    {70 kilos my ass. He`s 13 stone if he`s a pound!}
  3. Profile photo of drawman61
    drawman61 Male 50-59
    7738 posts
    December 20, 2013 at 3:06 pm
    Surely these forces could be used for propulsion
  4. Profile photo of Angilion
    Angilion Male 40-49
    12387 posts
    December 20, 2013 at 3:20 pm
    Surely these forces could be used for propulsion

    How? Or more accurately, how could they do so more efficiently than other means of propulsion?

    There`s maglev, but that`s only useful for trains and is still extremely rare even after decades of R&D because it`s extremely expensive.
  5. Profile photo of Mikeoxsbiggg
    Mikeoxsbiggg Male 30-39
    1502 posts
    December 20, 2013 at 3:56 pm
    Something about creating a magnetic field to counteract the earths. It was tested then shut down quickly and never developed.
  6. Profile photo of McGovern1981
    McGovern1981 Male 30-39
    14268 posts
    December 20, 2013 at 3:59 pm
    Surely these forces could be used for propulsion


    If you reverse them you can but then you run into a range problems with range.
  7. Profile photo of McGovern1981
    McGovern1981 Male 30-39
    14268 posts
    December 20, 2013 at 4:01 pm
    and interfering with things. You could use a magnetic train system in a way but it doesn`t help when you`re up in space unless you make something most of us can`t comprehend at the moment.
  8. Profile photo of ajd121
    ajd121 Male 18-29
    625 posts
    December 20, 2013 at 4:48 pm
    The best use for magnets wheni t comes to transportation is having the train hover over the tracks this reduces the friction which requires a a substantially less amount of power to move and get up to speed. The only problem is for this effect to be possible currently the magnets would have to be supercooled to support that much weight.
  9. Profile photo of Evil_Eye
    Evil_Eye Male 18-29
    1442 posts
    December 20, 2013 at 6:35 pm
    @ajd121: Maglev train! Blows my mind every time.
  10. Profile photo of MrPeabody
    MrPeabody Male 30-39
    1920 posts
    December 20, 2013 at 6:39 pm
    This reminds me of this story: Dirk`s Accident (Not for the squeamish)
  11. Profile photo of Draculya
    Draculya Male 40-49
    14620 posts
    December 20, 2013 at 7:37 pm
    I`ve done trapped my fingers this way. It is serious
  12. Profile photo of Gerry1of1
    Gerry1of1 Male 50-59
    36648 posts
    December 20, 2013 at 8:45 pm

    "I`ve done trapped my fingers this way. It is serious"
    OMG my mind is blown. Is that deep? Is it something I should understand? It is Friday and I`ve had way too many beers to play with me like that. You "tapped your fingers THIS way" ... WHAT WAY? I must know!
  13. Profile photo of Gerry1of1
    Gerry1of1 Male 50-59
    36648 posts
    December 20, 2013 at 8:46 pm

    WHAT!?!
  14. Profile photo of Angilion
    Angilion Male 40-49
    12387 posts
    December 20, 2013 at 10:13 pm
    The best use for magnets wheni t comes to transportation is having the train hover over the tracks this reduces the friction which requires a a substantially less amount of power to move and get up to speed.

    True...but the biggest power drains for a train are accelerating the mass of the train and overcoming air resistance at normal speeds. Maglev does absolutely nothing to reduce either, so the overall power savings aren`t much.

    The best argument for maglev is probably track maintainance costs. Since the train doesn`t even touch the track, there`s far less wear.

    The only problem is for this effect to be possible currently the magnets would have to be supercooled to support that much weight.

    No, they don`t. It depends on how you do the maglev - some versions work at normal temperatures.

    The biggest problem is probably the cost of building the tracks and trains.
  15. Profile photo of Gerry1of1
    Gerry1of1 Male 50-59
    36648 posts
    December 20, 2013 at 10:18 pm

    "Surely these forces could be used for propulsion"
    If only we could turn them on their sides and put an axel between the two wheel-like magnets.
  16. Profile photo of Draculya
    Draculya Male 40-49
    14620 posts
    December 21, 2013 at 1:22 am
    @Gerry1of1 A few years back I nearly lost the tips of 8 fingers in a magnetic chuck made out of Nd magnets a half inch thick and the size of a shoe box. There are procedures to follow and I didn`t. The entire 30lb vise lept off the bench and attached itself to the heavy metal plate I was holding. I hadn`t expected that. It felt like double fisting a meat grinder. You wouldn`t believe how thin you can crush fingertips and make a full recovery, or I`d be typing with two thumbs and stumps.
  17. Profile photo of Nickel2
    Nickel2 Male 50-59
    5879 posts
    December 21, 2013 at 4:04 am
    The force is strong with this... etc.
    Hard-drives contain strong magnets. If you allow those to collide, they shatter and send out very sharp fragments at great speed that cut into your skin. That was quite enough for me, respect the magnets, they are not toys!
  18. Profile photo of bacon_pie
    bacon_pie Male 30-39
    3061 posts
    December 21, 2013 at 6:17 am

  19. Profile photo of SmagBoy1
    SmagBoy1 Male 40-49
    4432 posts
    December 21, 2013 at 8:19 am
    Angilion, why do you say that maglev doesn`t reduce the amount of power required to accelerate the train`s mass? If the friction coefficient is drastically reduced, doesn`t that directly reduce the amount of power required to accelerate? I`m not disagreeing, I`m genuinely asking.
  20. Profile photo of Tiredofnicks
    Tiredofnicks Male 30-39
    5097 posts
    December 21, 2013 at 10:58 am
    drawman61: Surely these forces could be used for propulsion
    An electric motor does precisely that.


    Mikeoxsbiggg: Something about creating a magnetic field to counteract the earths. It was tested then shut down quickly and never developed.
    I`m not quite sure what you mean by "counteract the earths" but I will bite anyway, correct me if I misinterpreted it.

    The Earth`s magnetic field at surface level is somewhere around 0.000 031 tesla. An average fridge magnet puts out 0.005 tesla, (161 times greater) and the loudspeaker likely sitting near your computer has a magnet in it with roughly 1 tesla`s worth (a whopping 32 258 times greater than the Earth`s), and yet none of them spontaneously floats away because of many things, but mainly that it takes many times again the field strength to counteract the pull of gravity.

    In short, it got abandoned because it`s vastly inefficient and unlikely to improve with the
  21. Profile photo of Tiredofnicks
    Tiredofnicks Male 30-39
    5097 posts
    December 21, 2013 at 11:10 am
    The character limit is a lie!


    cont`d: ...current set of natural laws.

    Also Mikeoxsbiggg, here`s a picture for you, may it serve you well.

  22. Profile photo of drawman61
    drawman61 Male 50-59
    7738 posts
    December 21, 2013 at 4:43 pm
    Sorry, I meant free propulsion.
  23. Profile photo of Javien
    Javien Male 18-29
    270 posts
    December 21, 2013 at 6:07 pm
    He was technically floating, wasn`t he?
  24. Profile photo of Angilion
    Angilion Male 40-49
    12387 posts
    December 21, 2013 at 6:30 pm
    Angilion, why do you say that maglev doesn`t reduce the amount of power required to accelerate the train`s mass? If the friction coefficient is drastically reduced, doesn`t that directly reduce the amount of power required to accelerate? I`m not disagreeing, I`m genuinely asking.

    And you`re right...but rolling resistance on a train with steel wheels on a steel track is not very high. Wheeled trains are suprisingly efficient in that respect.

    So yes, maglev has lower power requirements for acceleration than a wheeled train...but not as much lower as it might seem. It also has an additional power requirement for any functioning - generating the magnetic field.

    Also, some versions of maglev require wheeled movement at lower speeds anyway.

    I was wrong in ignoring rolling resistance, but I *think* that overall I am right about power requirements being similar.
  25. Profile photo of carmium
    carmium Female 50-59
    6381 posts
    December 21, 2013 at 9:14 pm
    How do you get two of those magnets apart once they touch each other?
  26. Profile photo of Nickel2
    Nickel2 Male 50-59
    5879 posts
    December 22, 2013 at 2:47 am
    Slide them sideways.
  27. Profile photo of Tiredofnicks
    Tiredofnicks Male 30-39
    5097 posts
    December 22, 2013 at 4:57 am
    drawman61: Unfortunately that doesn`t work either, each time you make a magnet do work you degrade its field strength somewhat, up until the point where it will be completely drained and energy needs to be added to it for it to do its thing. The laws of thermodynamics makes stuff so boring. :(

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