Steam Engines And Old Farm Equipment

Submitted by: ElectricEye 3 years ago Misc

Still working! It"s all in the design.
There are 12 comments:
Male 153
This is just like every Tractor or Steam Engine Show in the Midwest.
0
Reply
Male 17,512
Nickel2: Yup, you are indeed smart and frugal. So many people these days aren`t.

"New" isn`t always better, in fact most of the time the new stuff is junk. Just seen a 2 year old Chrysler today, both left side door handles were broken, that`s just sad.
0
Reply
Male 5,874
CrakrJak- I bought my tumble-dryer in 1981, when I bought the house. It packed up last month, smelly and smokey. Being a skinflint, I ignore the pressure to buy a new one, and took it apart to find that a £1.25 thermal trip in the motor winding had fused. Put a new one, put it back together, good for another 32 years and saved £248.75.
My friends are still laughing, but £248.75 buys a lot of beer!
0
Reply
Male 593
After the total breakdown of society , this would be welcome anywhere, so , WHO IS LAUGHING NOW!
0
Reply
Male 17,512
CodeJockey: I`ll cite a prime example for you. In the 1990`s Consumer Reports rated all the washers and dryers sold for residential use. All of them got a "Good" rating or above. By 2010, only 2 had a "Good" rating, the rest were rated "Fair" or "Poor".

Many of these newer "greener" durable goods are just plain junk. My parents first refrigerator lasted over 20 years. My cousins bought an expensive one last year and it`s had to have costly repairs more than twice so far.
0
Reply
Male 5,608
2:07 "WOW!!! I think Mortimer`s goin` for full pull!!"
----------------
"...are no better than the Japanese and Chinese crap that we used to deride."
American goods have a different rep these days:
-Too expensive to compete in export
-Resistive to the metric system

Don`t confuse other nations` improvement with our getting worse.
We improved slightly while they improved greatly and they built on the concept of high rate of export while we we`ve been slow to adapt to a modern world that requires high amounts of automation on our part to compete with the lower labor rates in their areas.
0
Reply
Male 2,436
Very cool. I`m a mechanic... sorry, automobile technician, and I love this stuff. I have steam power in my blood!

A while ago I researched my ancestry on a website... I let you guess which one. I found out my great, great, great grandfather (direct paternal line) was a steam engineer in Philadelphia from ca. 1850-1880. His father-in-law, my x4 great grandfather was a steam boat captain. The families shared a residence. I assume they worked together.

Anyway, this gave me a feel for their everyday lives.
0
Reply
Male 17,512
"Never build them like that these days..."

That`s because these were made back in the day when the term "Durable Goods" wasn`t an oxymoron. These machines were made to last, not made to be in need of constant maintenance until a predetermined lifetime expired.

America used to be well known for and people took pride in owning "American Made" products. Now our products, in most cases, are no better than the Japanese and Chinese crap that we used to deride.
0
Reply
Male 36,388
Alarmingly UNSAFE! lolz! Never build them like that these days...

2:00 It has 25 Horsepower? But tons of torque :-)
0
Reply
Male 5,094
Cool, but with the available material about three minutes too long.
0
Reply
Male 550
Could watch those engines for hours.
0
Reply
Male 2,729
Link: Steam Engines And Old Farm Equipment [Rate Link] - Still working! It`s all in the design.
0
Reply