Reusable Rocket Passes Test With Flying Colors

Submitted by: Squrlz4Sale 4 years ago in Science

SpaceX"s Grasshopper rocket looks like something off the cover of a 1950s sci-fi magazine.
There are 16 comments:
Male 15,832
That`s the way a REAL rocket ship should take off and land!
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Male 904
Cool beans.

To me it looks like an incredible engineering feat that flexes the great rocket control systems they have developed. I wonder about the ultimate utility though because there`s a big difference between going up and hitting several hundred(?) miles per hour and floating back down, and getting to orbital velocities and trying to reorient a big tube to come in on a vertical descent. So says the I-A-Ber, the smartest folks in the land.
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Male 945
What`s the big deal? It`s not rocket sci......nevermind.
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Male 38,511

The tail rocket landing is for the moon or other airless planets. To return to earth you just attach wings for more fuel economy. Save the fuel to push the payload UP to space.

I`m glad to see space privatized. The only way we`ll get passenger service up there is for profit. The guv`ment don`t care about sending us.



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Male 184
It takes out a bird at lift-off @ around the 10 sec mark. You see it enter at the bottom of the screen and gets taken out as the rocket ignites.
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Male 6,227
@ Chalket: I understand your thinking there. It`s hard to understand how there`d be enough fuel left over after the ascent to land the pieces vertically like that. But SpaceX has already demonstrated enough technical know-how, I think, for us to assume they know what they`re doing. In May 2012, their Dragon spacecraft resupplied the ISS.

In fact, it`s looking to me like the right stuff may have departed NASA and found a new home at SpaceX.
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Male 2,711
Thanks for the link, Squrlz.
I don`t see how they can carry enough fuel to reach escape velocity and still safely land 3 separate pieces using thrusters. Doesn`t seem to compute, to me.
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Male 1,950
The stability seems great - awesome what today`s computers and sensors working in tandem can do. The bigger questions are, can it survive multiple trips through the atmosphere, and once landed on alien soil, how much fuel must already be there to enable another lift off?

Personally, I was hoping to see more of an X-15 - something that can be strapped on the back of a larger horizontal take off, then jettison mid-flight and leave the atmosphere. Still, I guess that doesn`t solve the landing aspect, nor the re-takeoff once landed outside of this planet.

Kudos, Sir Branson.
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Male 303
Alternative title - Your moms dildo just arrived.
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Male 6,227
@ Mikeoxsbiggg: LOL. Yes, rings or really big fins. And either silver or red, not white. Here (below) is the kind of image I had in mind when I wrote the post`s description.

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Male 6,227
@ Patchouly: This may help. Here`s an animated video of SpaceX`s endgoal, of which the Grasshopper rocket is a key component: LINK.
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Male 1,497
1950 sic-fi mag would have had rings around it for some reason.
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Male 2,670
Edit to add: Yes, this rocket didn`t enter orbit. This was a flight test to determine stability and control. But a similar rocket will soon blast off for space and land, just as this one did.
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Male 2,670
Patchouly:

It has EVERYTHING to do with space travel. What you just saw was the culmination of a dream decades in the making -- rocket takes off, enters orbit, leaves orbit, and lands. No dropping of booster stages. no splashdowns. The same vehicle takes off and lands.

The savings are enormous. The vehicle could take off and land from a tiny patch of concrete.

SCIENCE!
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Male 4,746
Admittedly, I haven`t been following this so maybe there is more to the story but...What the heck was that?!?

Lifting a rocket into the air and setting it back down has NOTHING to do with going into space and coming back again.
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Male 6,227
Link: Reusable Rocket Passes Test With Flying Colors [Rate Link] - SpaceX`s Grasshopper rocket looks like something off the cover of a 1950s sci-fi magazine.
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