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Category: Science
Date: 04/28/13 11:02 AM

25 Responses to Pictures Of Betelgeuse Blow Apart [Pic+]

  1. Profile photo of 5Cats
    5Cats Male 50-59
    33085 posts
    April 28, 2013 at 11:02 am
    Link: Pictures Of Betelgeuse Blow Apart - This HUGE star is blowing up only 640 light years away. Supernova soon...
  2. Profile photo of skytz1337
    skytz1337 Male 18-29
    687 posts
    April 28, 2013 at 11:22 am
    yea...soon..like..200 years or something
  3. Profile photo of Listypoos
    Listypoos Male 40-49
    3069 posts
    April 28, 2013 at 11:45 am
    It may have already blown apart....we just wouldn`t know about it for nearly 650 years.

    I`d love this star to go nova in my lifetime.....sadly the chances aren`t that good, in astronomy terms `just about to explode` could be anywhere in the hundreds of thousands of years range.
  4. Profile photo of Nickel2
    Nickel2 Male 50-59
    5879 posts
    April 28, 2013 at 12:01 pm
    Break out the factor 500 lotion!
  5. Profile photo of madduck
    madduck Female 50-59
    7597 posts
    April 28, 2013 at 12:10 pm
    To watch a super nova would be great, but as Listypoos said- chances are slim-
    Am I the only one slightly worried something might be getting hurt out there??
    Yeah- ok, I know. I`ll go to bed then.
  6. Profile photo of carmium
    carmium Female 50-59
    6381 posts
    April 28, 2013 at 12:25 pm
    Maybe there`s a poor planet orbiting that star... and watching its temperatures slowly rise, the CO2 rising in its atmosphere, the ice caps melting... Poor guys. 8-(
  7. Profile photo of Andrew155
    Andrew155 Male 18-29
    2579 posts
    April 28, 2013 at 12:51 pm
    I love all of the armchair astronomers here.
  8. Profile photo of 5Cats
    5Cats Male 50-59
    33085 posts
    April 28, 2013 at 1:13 pm
    @skytz1337 & @Listypoos: Yeah, either next year or 1 million years from now, approximately... give or take...

    @madduck: Pretty sure Betelgeuse doesn`t have any planets: it`s one of the best studied stars out there! It`s a true monster! Thousands of times bigger than our puny Sun, I don`t think any planets could survive that gravity.

    @carmium: If our Sun ejected that much "stuff"? It would wipe out the Earth, and Mars, and smack Jupiter around something awful! It`s the size of Uranus` orbit...

    @Nickel2: Yeah, that would be the minimum "Betelgeuse Block" required! :-) If it blew? It might have a "lethal radius" of 500 light years! One of the "great extinctions" in Earth`s history was a similar supernova only it was apx 200 light years away: BBQ`d our poor planet!

    Betelgeuse is COOL!
  9. Profile photo of Listypoos
    Listypoos Male 40-49
    3069 posts
    April 28, 2013 at 3:15 pm
    "Betelgeuse is COOL!"

    Relatively speaking, yeah... :D

    Get a load of Andrew getting all pissy just because some people take an interest in a topic. :D
  10. Profile photo of Angilion
    Angilion Male 40-49
    12387 posts
    April 28, 2013 at 9:08 pm
    Yeah, that would be the minimum "Betelgeuse Block" required! If it blew? It might have a "lethal radius" of 500 light years! One of the "great extinctions" in Earth`s history was a similar supernova only it was apx 200 light years away: BBQ`d our poor planet!

    Which one?

    I think you`re a bit out on the danger range. The astronomers I`ve read put the dangerous distance at about 25 light years. Supernovae are apocalyptic events, but 25 light years is a lot of safety room.

    Unless you`re thinking of a gamma ray burst powered by a supernova...in which case 500 light years isn`t far enough. 5000 light years could still be dangerous. GRBs are boggling destructive even by astronomy standards. But Betelgeuse can`t produce a GRB, so no problem there.
  11. Profile photo of hellavon
    hellavon Male 18-29
    111 posts
    April 28, 2013 at 9:13 pm
    am I trippin or if you stare at this long enough does it start moving?
  12. Profile photo of OldOllie
    OldOllie Male 60-69
    15841 posts
    April 28, 2013 at 9:46 pm
    Maybe there`s a poor planet orbiting that star... and watching its temperatures slowly rise...
    If there was an inhabited planet there, it`s long since been vaporized.
  13. Profile photo of auburnjunky
    auburnjunky Male 30-39
    10339 posts
    April 28, 2013 at 10:59 pm
    Betelgeuse, Betelgeuse, Betelgeuse.
  14. Profile photo of ferdyfred
    ferdyfred Male 40-49
    13631 posts
    April 29, 2013 at 12:47 am
    If it has gone super nova
    we will all be dead and gone before
    it shows owt here
    Oh and Andrew
    go sit back in your armchair of `whats the point of living`
  15. Profile photo of auburnjunky
    auburnjunky Male 30-39
    10339 posts
    April 29, 2013 at 1:20 am
    No we won`t Ferd. It will be a "second moon" for a few years, then die out.
  16. Profile photo of Angilion
    Angilion Male 40-49
    12387 posts
    April 29, 2013 at 5:10 am
    I think Ferdyfred was referring to us as individuals, not humanity in general. There would be ~640 years between Betelgeuse going nova and any sign of it reaching here, so if it went now then it`s almost certain that everyone alive today would be long dead before any sign of it showed up here.

    Although it might have gone nova ~640 years ago and we`ll see it next week. Probably not, but maybe.
  17. Profile photo of 5Cats
    5Cats Male 50-59
    33085 posts
    April 29, 2013 at 6:03 am
    @Angillion: You are correct! There`s been lots of "mass extinctions" aside for the 4 or 5 that were HUGE eh? I may be connecting the "Gamma Burst" one with a supernova one, but I thought they were two events. The Gamma one being a BIG extinction and the supernova one being a "small" extinction...

    We are looking at what happened 640 years ago. As close to "live on TV" as we`re going to get.

    This "mass ejection" was predicted as part of it`s "death by supernova". There may be others to come as well. It was HUGE by any measure :-) and that`s interesting!
  18. Profile photo of patchgrabber
    patchgrabber Male 30-39
    5812 posts
    April 29, 2013 at 6:42 am
    Technically it`s supposed to run into a wall of space dust or something in 5-12 thousand years, so it might be even more interesting than a supernova, depending on what happens.
  19. Profile photo of madduck
    madduck Female 50-59
    7597 posts
    April 29, 2013 at 10:11 am
    As long as no poor beings are - or were suffering it`s cool.
  20. Profile photo of patchgrabber
    patchgrabber Male 30-39
    5812 posts
    April 29, 2013 at 10:15 am
    After it`s gone, I wonder how Orion will draw his bow without his shoulder.
  21. Profile photo of Angilion
    Angilion Male 40-49
    12387 posts
    April 29, 2013 at 11:12 am
    There`s been lots of "mass extinctions" aside for the 4 or 5 that were HUGE eh?

    Well...no. You used the term "one of the great extinctions" and there are 5 of them - the extinction level events. Although some people argue that we`re in the 6th one right now, given the effect that humanity has had since the industrial revolution.

    The Gamma one being a BIG extinction and the supernova one being a "small" extinction...

    A supernova 200 lightyears away, if one happened, wouldn`t cause anything much on Earth. It wouldn`t kill anything, let alone cause widespread extinctions.

    The last I looked, GRB was a hypothesis for the cause of one of the ELE, not a proven cause.
  22. Profile photo of Angilion
    Angilion Male 40-49
    12387 posts
    April 29, 2013 at 11:31 am
    Hmm...this in interesting. There is a hypothesis that multiple supernovae in a group about 130 LY from Earth at the time might have temporarily damaged the ozone layer enough to kill off some surface plankton, which might have caused a higher than average rate of extinctions because plankton is at the bottom of a lot of food chains. That would match what you thought, if both the hypotheses are correct.

    So maybe the astronomers I`ve read are understating the risk, or maybe the astronomers behind the above hypothesis are wrong. I`ve read their paper, but I don`t know enough to evaluate it. It`s well over my head.
  23. Profile photo of 5Cats
    5Cats Male 50-59
    33085 posts
    April 29, 2013 at 12:00 pm
    @Angilion: Yes, I`m far from "an expert" myself (as you may have suspected!).

    The GRB (from a known source) was "backtracked" and seems to have been pointed at where the Earth was 400 million-odd years ago, killing off the trilobites... not entirely, just most of them. Could be coincidence of course! Not scheduled to happen again, ever, luckily!

    The "supernova extinction" I read about a while ago. It`s just a theory (of course!) but there seems to be a link in one of the "lesser extinction periods" and a thin layer of "supernova residue". Since there`s been no supernovas close enough to (easily) explain that? They came up with 2 other theories. Multiple- and "Super-" supernovae...
  24. Profile photo of 5Cats
    5Cats Male 50-59
    33085 posts
    April 29, 2013 at 12:02 pm
    @patchy: It`ll still be there, just not nearly as bright.

    It will be like Orion has nasty arthritis... :-? poor fellow!
  25. Profile photo of Ani187
    Ani187 Female 30-39
    4448 posts
    April 29, 2013 at 5:41 pm
    SCIENCE!!!

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