Biology Of Color Mixing: The Mystery Of Magenta

Submitted by: Squrlz4Sale 4 years ago Science

Your retinas can detect only red, blue, or green. So where does magenta come from? Or yellow? Or white?
There are 21 comments:
Male 486
White is achieved by mixing light.
Brown or black or gray is achieved by mixing pigments.
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Male 81
SSSsss...
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Male 406
wonder if there is aliasing in color mixing
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Male 2,859
Depends if youre mixing paint or light. Plus I`m colourblind so I dont care. Next.

"So how do you get brown?"

By having the poo kicked out of you for asking silly questions.
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Male 5,874
I understand all of the colour stuff having done additive and subtractive mixing as part of an animation course. I don`t understand how they can get the sound out of sync with video though.
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Male 251
Think of it this way, it is a reflection of light rays across the spectrum. The more absorptive the color, the darker it appears, the more reflective, the brighter it appears. It`s the principal of the albedo effect.
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Female 258
Brown is essentially dark yellowy-orange.
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Male 2,988
think of black (in a light ray standpoint) this way. you have a piece of wood and add water to it (light) and there will be a spectrum of how wet to dry it can become, from completely soaked to completely dry. this is from white to brown (dark brown approaching black). now if you use a seelant on the wood and no water can be added to it, that is what back is. no light rays of any wavelength are effecting it
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Male 2,988
correct gerry. adding more and more light of different wavelengths (in our human visible spectrum of course) will lead to white. taking all light out leads to back.

adding more and more pigments will get you brown, and that color will approach black but may not actually reach that.
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Male 6,227

THIS IS SO CONFUSING!!!

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Male 2,988
i am disappointed that he didnt really bring in the concept of how red, green, blue is a additive color model, while cyan, magenta, yellow is a subtractive color model. mixing pigments and light rays are different beasts.

so @bordo, thats why mixing all the colors in pigments (inks) will get you brown, but in light rays (his torches), white.
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Male 4,893

The primary colors for light are different than they are for paints. When light mixes the colors ADD together, but paint is SUBTRACTIVE.

The more you know! ==========*
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Male 815
Skypirate- it`s none, if I remember correctly
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Female 583
@Darkmagic

I`ve pondered that too, but I`m pretty sure that`s not actually possible. When you take into account color mixing and color theory. Same with colorblindness. What I find more mindblowing interesting is that there are WAY more colors that exist, we just can`t see them.
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Male 38,069

KlouD - black is the absence of light.
White is the absence of color.

I don`t care what his flashlights say in the video. Bleach all the color out and you get white. Turn the lights out and everything goes black.
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Male 253
skypirate said: "i still want to know if black is all or none of the colors."

Black is the absence of color.
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Male 1,625
[quote]So how do you get brown?[/quote]

1. open photoshop
2. mix red/green/blue
3. find right ratio of each
4. ???
5. find brown

he is saying 50/50 red/green = yellow, 50/50 green/blue = cyan, 50/50 red/blue = magenta (somehow), and 33/33/33 red/green/blue = white
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Male 907
So how do you get brown?
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Male 1,625
what blows my mind the most about colors is that someone might see what I would call green, "red", but because they were taught from childhood that when they see that shade, its "red."
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Male 2,564
i`ve read a good argument saying our brains make up the color yellow. i still want to know if black is all or none of the colors.
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Male 6,227
Link: Biology Of Color Mixing: The Mystery Of Magenta [Rate Link] - Your retinas can detect only red, blue, or green. So where does magenta come from? Or yellow? Or white?
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