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Category: Science
Date: 12/17/12 07:31 AM

15 Responses to Creative Demonstration Of The Pythagorean Theorem

  1. Profile photo of Tiredofnicks
    Tiredofnicks Male 30-39
    5101 posts
    December 17, 2012 at 7:33 am
    Link: Creative Demonstration Of The Pythagorean Theorem - Is it any clearer to you now?
  2. Profile photo of piperfawn
    piperfawn Male 30-39
    4887 posts
    December 17, 2012 at 7:40 am
    cool.
  3. Profile photo of Draculya
    Draculya Male 40-49
    14544 posts
    December 17, 2012 at 7:41 am
    Not a `proof` though
  4. Profile photo of Big61AL
    Big61AL Male 40-49
    59 posts
    December 17, 2012 at 8:15 am
    So what`s the point? shouldn`t a simple measurement of the two squares show the same result?
  5. Profile photo of TruTenrMan
    TruTenrMan Male 30-39
    2553 posts
    December 17, 2012 at 8:24 am
    Why is (a^2)+(b^2)=(c^2) so hard to understand?
  6. Profile photo of FoolsPrussia
    FoolsPrussia Male 30-39
    3446 posts
    December 17, 2012 at 8:39 am
    Why are you making me think about something I`ve deliberately suppressed for at least 12 years?
  7. Profile photo of carmium
    carmium Female 50-59
    6381 posts
    December 17, 2012 at 8:47 am
    OH-oh. Now I get it.

    (A lot of work just for people who don`t trust arithmetic.)
  8. Profile photo of jendrian
    jendrian Male 18-29
    2516 posts
    December 17, 2012 at 10:26 am
    @Draculya: Yes a proof, provided the height of each chamber is the same (and it seems like it is in that video, as I`ve seen this demonstration in person before). It actually doesn`t get more "proofy" than physically putting it in evidence.

    @Big61AL: Sure, what you have to measure is the area though, so you have to cut it up in squares and fit them all in the areas of the other two squares. Or you could just flow the area from one to the other two and let fluid mechanics do the arranging.

    @carmium: it`s actually geometry, but it`s slightly more complicated than just squaring the sides. It`s not immediately obvious that the area of the bigger square is exactly the sum of the area of the other two squares. Just like it`s not obvious that the internal angles all add up to 180 degrees (in Euclidean spaces)
  9. Profile photo of Grendel
    Grendel Male 40-49
    5864 posts
    December 17, 2012 at 10:53 am
    If you need THIS to understand the Pythagorean Theorem, you have not business understanding the Pythagorean Theorem.
  10. Profile photo of MacGuffin
    MacGuffin Female 30-39
    2602 posts
    December 17, 2012 at 2:47 pm
    The video demonstrates *that* the theorem is true. This diagram demonstrates *why* it`s true:

  11. Profile photo of jendrian
    jendrian Male 18-29
    2516 posts
    December 17, 2012 at 9:56 pm
    @MacGuffin: That doesn`t demonstrate why either, that only demonstrates that it is.

    Why it`s true is still a subject of research, as is my understanding, since it doesn`t have to be true (and in fact it isn`t in all kinds of spaces, it is only true in flat/euclidean space)
  12. Profile photo of drawman61
    drawman61 Male 50-59
    7707 posts
    December 18, 2012 at 4:45 am
    Now I`m just confused about something I didn`t care about
  13. Profile photo of andybme
    andybme Male 50-59
    296 posts
    December 18, 2012 at 6:49 am
    Looks like common sense to me
  14. Profile photo of MacGuffin
    MacGuffin Female 30-39
    2602 posts
    December 18, 2012 at 3:01 pm
    Why it`s true is still a subject of research, as is my understanding, since it doesn`t have to be true (and in fact it isn`t in all kinds of spaces, it is only true in flat/euclidean space)

    Stay off those drugs, dude. Hint: a *square* (which Pythagoras` Theorem makes heavy use of) is a two-dimensional shape. It only exists in Euclidean space. Otherwise it`d be a cube. Or a tesseract. Or an n-dimensional hypercube. The diagram below demonstrates exactly why Pythagoras` Theorem works - namely that exactly the same amount of space is left over when you surround a square of side length equal to the hypotenuse or two squares with side lengths equal to the lengths of the opposite and ajacent sides laid corner to corner with a larger square of the same size in each case. It is not a "matter of research", it`s a mathematical proof that`s been fully understood for thousands of years.
  15. Profile photo of jendrian
    jendrian Male 18-29
    2516 posts
    December 20, 2012 at 10:29 pm
    @MacGuffin: I`m a physicist, in case you`ve missed the thousands of posts where I`ve made that obvious.

    Draw a square in a piece of paper. Bend that piece of paper. OMFG a 2D figure projected in 3D curved space! Holy sh*t that must be the work of the devil for you.

    Your picture only demonstrates that it is true in 2D Euclidean space. Good luck demonstrating that the areas remain the same when the square lives in curved space, here`s a hint: they don`t. Ergo, your drawing doesn`t say WHY, by any chance, the sum of the areas MUST be unequivocally the same. Believe it or not, questions like that keep us mathematicians up at night. No meds necessary though.

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