1,000 Wrongfully Convicted And Counting...

Submitted by: TracyOpp 4 years ago in

Why there are so many wrongful convictions and how one 16-year-old had to fight for his freedom.
There are 64 comments:
Male 38
@CrakrJak

You seem to be confused with drafting laws and "making" laws. SCOTUS makes law all the time. Every time the Court interprets and delivers an opinion, that is the law of the land (with some exceptions such as in the case of a plurality opinion). Sometimes a decision creates new law, sometimes, it merely clarifies a constitutional right "for the books" so to speak. If SCOTUS`s interpretation declares something unconstitutional, such as governmental restriction on a woman`s fundamental right to personal autonomy, there is nothing, short of amending the Constitution, that the legislature (the branch that you mistakenly believe has exclusive rights to "make" laws) can do.

That being said, with the current state of the political arena, it seems unlikely that Republicans will have the political clout anytime soon (if ever) to amend the Constitution to outlaw abortions. Move on and focus on something productive.
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Male 7,378
That would be two elections my short minded friend. Your abortion stance was a career ender for every politician that let it be known. Your state is now concentrating on making abortion illegal and every politician behind it will eventually be removed. It`s a losing argument that can be won with facts and statistics but we know republicans reject facts. You`re not going to get your way. Abortion will remain legal in America your entire life. There is nothing you can do about it. In fact, just about every stance you hold on everything is the exact opposite of how a normal person acts. Perhaps you should do the opposite of every impulse you have, you might actually make something of yourself for a change.
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Male 17,512
madest: I still fail to see how the results of one election makes this `Your World`. We share this nation and the planet with others and that would`ve remained the same regardless of who won in November.

Abortion was not legislated, no bill or amendment was passed to make it `legal`. The SCOTUS doesn`t make law, they interpret it and they`ve increasingly become more interested in saving the life of the unborn rather than allowing it`s continued destruction. Even the woman anonymously named `Roe` in that famous case has came out against abortion.
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Male 661
@CrakrJak nice hijack of thread.

ccalhoun86, well put.
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Male 7,378
[quote]It is not `Your world`, you megalomaniac.[/quote] --------------
Oh but you`re mistaken my unaborted friend. I`m all for abortion and lo and behold abortion is legal in America. I`m a proud democrat and lo and behold our country rejected republican nonsense and re-elected a democrat for president in a landslide. If you had anything at all going for you it`s people like me who would rather pay for people like you than let you die homeless on the street. You`re welcome by the way.
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Male 2,850
@CrakrJak

Nobody says the unborn child isn`t human. The clippings from my toenails are human.

The debate is whether it`s a PERSON.
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Male 76
I think madest lashing out has very little to do with "winning the argument" and a whole lot to do with describing why he refuses to attempt a rational debate with a hateful, petty non-nice individual who spews half truths, blatant lies, GOP propaganda, and irrelevant biblical excrement more than my baby spews formula. I`ve been on i-a-b for 2+ years, and have noticed you argue against every notion of fairness, freedom, and intelligence; using misinformation, backwards logic, and reasoning plucked from a dogma that enforces hate, slavery, subordination of women, murder, and hypocrisy. You take from the very society that you have nothing to give in return, and criticize the drat out of everything that isn`t 100% what you agree with. I don`t know the extent of your disability, but I`m gonna go into my dark place and say I wish something fell on your testicles, because a man with crushed balls can`t get in to heaven. Who would you pray to then?
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Male 17,512
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Male 17,512
madest: Tantrums? You`re the one acting infantile sir and you`ve demonstrated as much in this thread. It is not `Your world`, you megalomaniac.
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Male 143
i would be absolutely terrified to live in that country...
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Female 582
"So we can call the system the United Soviet Socialist Republic all we want, but it`s only useful if you have a workable alternative. I am all ears for any solutions."

Well, for one thing, DNA evidence is not public property. It`s the property of the police department that collected it. NPR was discussing the other day that someone had been wrongfully convicted because the DNA evidence belonged to the police department and they didn`t have to release it to the defendant. They didn`t use it in the trial because it didn`t support the prosecution.

The problem with the psychology of the police and justice system is that a person is innocent until proven guilty, but if the lawyer for the prosecution is a better lawyer and evidence that would support the defendant isn`t released, then the system is skewed to get convictions.

Go compare the per capita rate of incarceration in the United States compared to other countries. We don`t have more deviants, jus
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Male 1,674
"you`re not living in your world. You`re living in mine."

Great, a world of full of idiots. :(
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Male 7,378
Abortion is legal in America CJ. There is nothing your pea sized brain can do about it except throw tantrums when reminded you`re not living in your world. You`re living in mine.
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Male 1,674
i hate to break up this incredibly relevent abortion debate, but you all realize that madest admitted to being an idiot, right?
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Male 17,512
madest: You`re raving mad, casting wild aspersions and spouting vapid derogatory slanders.

That`s about par for the course with you when you are loosing the argument. That sort of lashing-out is indicative of an unstable mind and it endears no one to your side.
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Male 928
Whatever the little prick probably is guilty just sayin.
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Male 7,378
CJ, You`re retarded. You want a small government that`s involved in everyone`s bedroom. Nobody is having sex with you, so there`s little chance of your spawn being aborted. You care about other people having abortions yet are too poor to adopt unwanted children. You`re nothing but a loudmouth societal drain. How about you keep your silly BS that in no way involves you, to yourself? Your mother could have done America a service by aborting you.
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Male 17,512
madest: The difference is the unborn haven`t been convicted of anything, rightfully or wrongly. A human life is a human life, whether or not it`s head has breached it`s womb is not important.

Those using the word "fetus" to describe an unborn child are deluding themselves away from the fact that it`s a human being. An unborn child dreams (thinks), breathes amniotic fluid, have beating hearts and fingers and toes after 3 months.
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Male 14,835
Miscarriages of justice are common everywhere. Here in Hong Kong, in the UK where I`m from and especially in China. The psychology and bureaucracy is universal:

Tunnel vision > trumped up charges and forced confession > judges that weigh evidence unfairly > a system that won`t admit that the system doesn`t always work.
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Male 7,378
Romney is a tax dodger. If there was justice in America he would have been in jail not the nominee of the republican party.
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Male 1,674
Also, this would never happen if Romney got elected. Welcome to four more years of innocent people being put in jail
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Male 221
CrakrJak no wonder the Republicans are in a death spiral. The easiest way to drastically lower the Abortion rate is comprehensive free contraception something most of the RW are against
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Male 1,421
That analogy almost made me sick... Comparing abortions to wrongful convictions and stating that they are linked in anyway (well, locking up fathers undoubtly will result in more abortions from the mothers..) is just a result of sick and twisted mind.

Bottomline is, you just don`t care. The thinking goes: they would`ve done something anyway so might as well lock them up now. You want them to suffer for some weird reason.
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Male 1,421
"So please tell me again, which is the greater crime? Killing 50 million innocent children or a few hundred innocent adults? "

Fetuses. Not children, not human yet, fetuses. Children are breathing, thinking humanbeings, fetuses are a bunch of cells.
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Male 1,674
"Those baiting tactics might work on your fellow republican tards but they`re not even in the same hemisphere to people with a 2 digit IQ or more. "

"I won`t have a conversation with someone who equates abortion with jailing and even executing a wrongfully convicted human being. "

So considertin you took he bait - which one are yoou? Republican or an idiot?
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Male 7,775
Yay, US law enforcement.
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Male 7,378
[quote]madest: From 1973 through 2008, nearly 50 million legal abortions have occurred in the US.[/quote] ---------
I won`t have a conversation with someone who equates abortion with jailing and even executing a wrongfully convicted human being. Those baiting tactics might work on your fellow republican tards but they`re not even in the same hemisphere to people with a 2 digit IQ or more.
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Male 17,512
madest: From 1973 through 2008, nearly 50 million legal abortions have occurred in the US.

So please tell me again, which is the greater crime? Killing 50 million innocent children or a few hundred innocent adults?
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Male 3,631
Wow - that`s scary.
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Male 10,855
@BlankTom

I see your point, but I think the numbers being discussed here are too broad. Quite frankly we have too many people locked up for the wrong (see drug wars), that`s a different discussion. The discussion should instead focus on how many people have been convicted of murder not just crimes in general.
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Male 1,674
see kree, teach a man a fish....

but i still think you`re off on your numbers. Where are you getting .07% from? And for that matter, what are you basing the 1% from?
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Male 1,154
Blanktom, Out of a population of 100,000 people.....

Wait a second.

Right, I see that. To compare at that level, I would need to look at total population not just prison population so,

.07% of people are wrongfully convicted, still the highest out of those listed, but on the same scale.
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Male 1,674
@kree be more specific about your statistics and you should see where you flaw is.
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Male 1,154
Blanktom

Rape is at .002%
Malpractive at .05%
Car accidents at .02%

1% is a huge number. Gigantic.
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Male 1,674
kree, yes, it could definatly be better. And I[`m not even going to say that the justice system is without flaws. But i don`t believe that the relatively small false convictions is one of them.
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Male 1,154
Andrew, Part of the problem, is that cops are rewarded for high arrest rates. And that prosecutors are rewarded for high conviction rates.
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Male 3,285
See. Theres the inherent problem. You rely on a Jury. A group of random people plucked from the streets with no real checks. This leaves them open to stupid and ridiculous opinions, especially when half of them dont want to be there in the first place, and will just say anything to get out of there ( after all, its not their life, what do they care.), the other half after the free board for big trials etc.

ALL judgements should be handed down after full and complete investigations, coupled with full evidence. Not circumstancial which the US justice system relies on.

Then we have the fact that innocence and guilt does not matter in a US courtroom. All that matters is how your lawyer works, and if he can "brainwash" the uneducated people in the jury.

And people here still say the justice system is good and working well?
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Male 412
In any system that is designed to validate or reject a hypothesis (in this case, conviction), there are always Type I and Type II errors. But, that doesn`t mean we shouldn`t be working to mitigate those as much as possible.
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Male 412
@carmium: I`m not overtly arguing against your statement, but do you have a link to data that supports that assertion? I`d like to understand how strong that link is.
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Male 2,578
I`m totally willing to acknowledge that even one wrongful conviction is not "good" or "just. And yes, it exposes a deep flaw in our judicial system.

Yet, to my knowledge, there no alternatives that will yield us zero wrongful convictions. A jury will always be wrong sometimes. If a judge or some "non-partial" arbiter were to decide, they would still be wrong occasionally.

Even if we were to expand the concept of reasonable doubt getting somebody off, which I would support despite many OJesque criminals getting off, there would still be hundreds and probably thousands of wrongful convictions.

So we can call the system the United Soviet Socialist Republic all we want, but it`s only useful if you have a workable alternative. I am all ears for any solutions.
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Male 1,154
Blanktom. Then we have reached an agreement? I do not say it is flawed, you say it could be better?
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Male 2,167
There is no "Justice" system, only a Legal system.
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Female 6,381
It`s no excuse for a miscarriage of justice, but I might point out that most "iffy" or even dubious convictions are against people with long records who have somehow avoided the jail time they deserved in the past.
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Male 1,674
@kree, sure - go ahead and work to make the justice system better, if that`s your thing. I have no problme about that.

What I do have a problem with is saying that our Justice System is flawed because there is such a small percentage of people being wrongfully convicted.
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Male 1,154
Blanktom, people fight to make cars safer, and to make rapes/murder less likely. We do not sit idly by and say "good enough."

Prison is a horrible horrible place. You should not wish it upon anyone, and you should not write off those who end up there accidentally as casualties of the system.
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Male 1,674
i totally agree with you Madest. We should be using the death penalty more frequently. Only 1300 people seems like it`s not even worth talking about.
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Male 13,624
Tell its the end of days when Im with MacGuffin, AND tedgp !!!
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Male 7,378
Since 1976 when the death penalty was reinstated, there have been 131 people from 26 states released from death row with evidence of their innocence. 1,269 people have been executed in the U.S. some of whom we know were innocent.
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Male 1,674
kree, you may want to check the logic behind your 2-4 classmates, lol..

I just pulled the .01% out of my ass, but even if we`re somewhere between .05 and 1% false convictions, i`m saying that`s far better than the alternative.

The truth is that bad things happen to innocent people all the time. Car crashes, medical malpractice, rape, murder... you name it. And i`d be willing to be each one of those happens more frequently than a wrongful conviction. For me, i`d rather spend a few years in jail than to be paralyzed by a drunk driver.

The problem is that people get emotionally attached to these stories and ignore the truth of the whole. No one cares about the millions of stories of how a person was properly convicted, but yet we hear this video and jump up and say "The justice system is flawed!"
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Male 1,627
how do you know going to play video games was an alibi to go rob a store
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Female 2,602
I hate it when IAB makes me agree with tedgp. America`s so-called justice system, which lets governments away with torture and grown men away with murdering teenage boys until the media embarrasses the police into acting, but yet still manages to imprison millions of ordinary Americans every year, is broken beyond repair. Countries have fallen into revolution for less.
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Male 1,154
Blanktom,

I think 100000 crimals not in jail is better than 1000 innocents in jail. That being said, your .01% number seems very low. And most of the sources I took a quick look at say between .5% and 1%. The average high school has about 200 students per grade. So chances are 2-4 of your classmates will end up wrongfully convicted. It might be you.
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Male 4,893

Our system is a joke. Prosecutors want a conviction, they don`t care about the truth. Public defenders are garbage and cops are liars. The more money you have, the less time you will serve....if any time at all.

Personally, I would rather see a guilty man walk free than a innocent man convicted.
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Male 1,674
SmagBoy, saying that just shows your ignorance. 1000 people is remarkably good. If you want to completely eliminate the <0.01% error, then you`re going to have to be okay with having 100,000s of criminals set free. You can`t have it both ways.

Do you realize there are more people who die each year for medical malpractice than are wrongfully convicted? Should we eliminate all doctors?
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Male 13,624
tedgp
I have to agree there dude
Especially in the nanny state we live in now
Just takes one disgruntled person, and boom, your in custody
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Male 3,285
The fact that one person is wrongfully convicted shows that the justic system isnt fit for purpose. Trying to justify it using very very stupid statistics that turn innocent people into numbers is drating insane.
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Male 4,431
Andrew, our system is *supposed* to be setup to protect the innocent. So, to answer your question, drat no it`s not good. At all. And you look at this case and even if that`s the only one ever, that couldn`t possibly EVER be considered good. :-(
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Male 4,431
But, hey, you know, if you`ve done nothing wrong, you`ve got nothing to worry about. Right? Yeah, whatever. Damn. :-(
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Male 1,674
hmmm, Gerry, i think you might be missing a decimal in those statistics you gave.
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Male 38,494

The error rate in convictions is between 13 & 25 % depending on which state you live in.
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Male 2,578
I mean if you`re talking about 1,000 out of the millions and millions of people who have been jailed for the past few decades, isn`t that good?
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Male 2,167
United Soviet Socialist Republic.Welcome.
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Male 1,674
wow - only 1000 people? That`s incredibly small. I guess it shows how good the US Court justice system is.
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Female 4
Link: 1,000 Wrongfully Convicted And Counting... [Rate Link] - Why there are so many wrongful convictions and how one 16-year-old had to fight for his freedom.
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