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Category: Science
Date: 05/30/12 07:37 AM

25 Responses to 56 Years Of Tornado Tracks In America [Pic]

  1. Profile photo of eugenius
    eugenius Male 30-39
    1620 posts
    May 30, 2012 at 7:38 am
    Link: 56 Years Of Tornado Tracks In America - Hmph, I would have thought there`d be a lot more over 56 years.
  2. Profile photo of swoop408
    swoop408 Male 18-29
    1754 posts
    May 30, 2012 at 7:49 am
    The Midwest and East gets pounded. I`ll enjoy my predictable sunny weather with little humidity here in California, thanks.
  3. Profile photo of McGovern1981
    McGovern1981 Male 30-39
    14268 posts
    May 30, 2012 at 7:54 am
    vv Enjoy falling into the ocean!!
  4. Profile photo of Stonardsftw
    Stonardsftw Male 18-29
    321 posts
    May 30, 2012 at 8:12 am
    @McGovern1981
    Lolno, there is almost no falling.
  5. Profile photo of LazyMe484
    LazyMe484 Male 18-29
    10441 posts
    May 30, 2012 at 8:13 am
    Could someone explain what`s going on with that hole around West Virginia?
  6. Profile photo of LazyMe484
    LazyMe484 Male 18-29
    10441 posts
    May 30, 2012 at 8:13 am
    Is it the terrain that does that?
  7. Profile photo of Angelmassb
    Angelmassb Male 18-29
    15511 posts
    May 30, 2012 at 8:15 am
    You can tell who are Gods favorites
  8. Profile photo of mamba
    mamba Male 18-29
    628 posts
    May 30, 2012 at 8:22 am
    `Enjoy falling into the ocean!!`
    Well if that actually happened, enjoy losing the biggest contributor of your country`s income, rehousing the hqs of the USA`s biggest companies at a cost of billions of dollars and rehousing 38mil people out of your own pocket.... just sayin =p
  9. Profile photo of MacGuffin
    MacGuffin Female 30-39
    2602 posts
    May 30, 2012 at 8:25 am
    I wonder what`s so special about that area surrounding the border of Kentucky and West Virginia at the top right of the map. It`s so dark from having so little recorded activity that it sticks out like a sore thumb.
  10. Profile photo of PosisDas
    PosisDas Male 30-39
    52 posts
    May 30, 2012 at 8:29 am
    The Appalacian mountains can explain the hole near the eastern US
  11. Profile photo of MacGuffin
    MacGuffin Female 30-39
    2602 posts
    May 30, 2012 at 8:36 am
    Ah, I see. Thanks.
  12. Profile photo of McGovern1981
    McGovern1981 Male 30-39
    14268 posts
    May 30, 2012 at 9:00 am
    @Stonardsftw

    Sliding shaking whatever.

    @mamba

    Never said it was good but at least you can go underground for a tornado earthquake not so much. The fault lines don`t lie it`s not if it`s when.
  13. Profile photo of CrakrJak
    CrakrJak Male 40-49
    17514 posts
    May 30, 2012 at 10:06 am
    If you look closely you can see the Mississippi river sort of outlined. Not very many tornadoes cross it.
  14. Profile photo of Dirk_Diggler
    Dirk_Diggler Male 18-29
    56 posts
    May 30, 2012 at 10:19 am
    that little spot in central indiana that has basically zero tornados...thats where I live! Hooray!
  15. Profile photo of DingDingDong
    DingDingDong Male 30-39
    1511 posts
    May 30, 2012 at 10:52 am
    Cool, I remember that little one by Portland Oregon. It took off some roofs a few miles from my house.
  16. Profile photo of 5Cats
    5Cats Male 50-59
    32823 posts
    May 30, 2012 at 11:45 am
    Cool!

    Nice catch @CrakrJak! Possibly because the land starts sloping down? It`s plainly visible (now that you pointed it out of course!) in the pattern.

    It seems that, overall, the total number and severity of tornados is down... Global Warming!!!
  17. Profile photo of mesovortex
    mesovortex Male 30-39
    458 posts
    May 30, 2012 at 11:58 am
    @5cats:

    This graph stops before 2011 - when we had a few record outbreaks and a large number of deaths due to tornadoes. If you include 2010 and 2011, the numbers are clearly going up.

    @CrackrJak

    That is a myth. The reason why it is outlined is that there is that the state boundaries are put on the map. If you follow that outline, plenty of tornadoes crossed the MS river. In fact one of the worst tornadoes in history, the Tri-State Tornado, crossed the MS river north of Cairo, IL.
  18. Profile photo of mesovortex
    mesovortex Male 30-39
    458 posts
    May 30, 2012 at 12:01 pm
    @LazyMe484

    Indirectly. Elevation usually means that as you go up the air is more and more stable - however the Smoky Mountains got an F4 tornado on Hatcher Mountain in 2011, and so did Lookout Mountain near Chattanooga in 2011. Tornadoes also happen out west on the high plains at elevations above 7,000 ft. Typically tornadoes don`t happen often as air goes up in elevation because the air becomes more stable - but if the conditions are right a tornado can happen on land or water and even on a mountain.
  19. Profile photo of CrakrJak
    CrakrJak Male 40-49
    17514 posts
    May 30, 2012 at 2:26 pm
    mesovortex: No, there are no state boundaries on that map at all, except for the rivers.

    Yes, tornadoes can and have crossed rivers, usually they are the really big F4 and F5 strength ones. Smaller funnels, for some odd reason, don`t usually survive crossing large rivers.

    I understand why meteorologists wish to `debunk` this effect, they don`t want people getting hurt over a false sense of security. All tornadoes should be taken seriously, Heed all warnings and sirens.

    But the phenomenon does have some merit to it as evidenced by this map. Only about 30 tornadoes have crossed the Mississippi river, in a hundred years, out of several hundred funnels that met it`s edge and dissipated.
  20. Profile photo of DuckBoy87
    DuckBoy87 Male 18-29
    3242 posts
    May 30, 2012 at 3:01 pm
    CrackrJak.. There are state boundaries on this map, unless the Mason-Dixon line is suddenly a river...
  21. Profile photo of CrakrJak
    CrakrJak Male 40-49
    17514 posts
    May 30, 2012 at 3:17 pm
    DuckBoy87: Sorry, you are correct.

    There are very dark gray lines, barely visible, on the map. I had to enlarge the map quite a bit to even see them.

    That doesn`t change the fact that you can see the outlines of several rivers w/o any visual evidence of gray lines in those areas of the map.
  22. Profile photo of mesovortex
    mesovortex Male 30-39
    458 posts
    May 30, 2012 at 6:35 pm
    @CrakrJak

    You are a creationist so I don`t blame you for being scientifically illiterate. The idea that tornadoes can`t cross rivers is a myth:

    From the NWS:
    "Myth: "Tornadoes don`t cross rivers." Although some landforms may influence the distribution of tornadoes, rivers do not have any clear effect on them. The great Tri-State tornado of 1925, the deadliest tornado ever recorded, crossed both the Mississippi and the Wabash Rivers."
  23. Profile photo of CrakrJak
    CrakrJak Male 40-49
    17514 posts
    May 30, 2012 at 7:11 pm
    mesovortex: Yes, I read that. They are calling it a `Myth` because they don`t want people lulled into a false sense of security. I understand that they want to err on the side of caution, but it`s naive to believe rivers don`t effect their local climate.

    The evidence for what I`m saying is plain as day, right there in front of your face. Gaps following the shape of the main rivers and tributaries.

    Rivers that are wide enough do produce a onshore-offshore wind cycle typical of seacoasts and lake shores. Rivers are conveyors of heat and that does thermally effect the atmosphere above them. Rivers shape the landscape they flow through and do modify the climate of their region, creating local wind and rainfall patterns.
  24. Profile photo of CrakrJak
    CrakrJak Male 40-49
    17514 posts
    May 30, 2012 at 7:25 pm
    Since meteorologists aren`t even certain as to the details of how a tornado forms, grows and dissipates, other than generalities. A lot of computer modelling has been done, and they believe they know the ingredients a funnel needs to form, that is quite a ways removed from knowing the `recipe` and how it`s `cooked`. Yes I`m using kitchen metaphors here for the ease of understanding for the sake of general IAB populace.

    If meteorologists knew more they`d be able to forecast tornadoes much more accurately and give people more than just a few minutes warning, in some cases there`s been no warning at all. The `holy grail` of weather prediction would be being able to warn people 30 minutes to an hour ahead, and many scientists believe that will one day be possible.

    I truly do wish that they figure the chaotic mystery of tornadoes out, but denying the thermal effects of rivers on our atmosphere will not help in that endeavor.
  25. Profile photo of turdburglar
    turdburglar Male 30-39
    4896 posts
    May 31, 2012 at 9:26 am
    Wow CrakrJak...You are soooooo smart. You must know, like....everything. Thank god that you are here to fill the comments section of every post, and educate the rest of us simpletons. Also, I should congratulate you for having opinions... that are far superior!

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