Crosswind Landings During A Storm At Dusseldorf

Submitted by: Student_Law 5 years ago in Misc

Don"t watch if you have a flight booked in the near future.
There are 46 comments:
Male 335
Nothing broken, nobody hurt. I don`t see any issues here. Crosswind landings can be challenging...and fun!
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Male 1,293
polglowa

Why post about something you know nothing about?

No aircraft can legally take off using autopilot.

What about the aircraft I fly that have no autoland facility?

As it happens autolands (Cat IIIB approaches) are rare. The aircraft must be equipped for it, and the crew trained for it. All associated equipment must be functioning correctly (no MEL restrictions). If LVPs are not in force at the airport the crew must request autoland - aircraft on the ground must then be held at the Cat III holding points, and if there are aircraft already beyond that, holding at a Cat II or Cat I holding point, then no autoland can take place.
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Male 2,220
Angillion - the wheels are skidding at touch down not rotating, so there`s a lot of play allowed at the initial point of contact, also there is presumably an element of self correction if the rate of descent is low and the horizontal aspect of the plan is level, in that the drag on the rear wheels being behind the CoG have a straightening affect.
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Male 3,310
Looks like someone designed their airstrip wrong.
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Male 12,365
Draculya:

My question wasn`t clear. I was wondering about just the final touchdown, when you`ve turned from crabbing along in the air above the runway to making physical contact with the runway itself. Obviously the ideal is to have the plane precisely parallel to the runway when you touch it, pointing exactly straight down the runway. My question was how far you can deviate from *that*, e.g. what if you hadn`t fully turned the plane from crabbing partially sideways against the wind before touching down, or you overcorrected and swung a bit the other way? Say, for example, you were crabbing at 9 degrees and touched down at 5 degrees instead of 0 degrees. Do the wheels on the landing gear swivel? Could the plane remain balanced moving on the ground at an angle? Or would that cause what you mentioned - one wing dipping and the engine cowling dragging on the ground?
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Male 15,832
With a small plane you keep it lined up with the runway and bank into the wind; then you put it down one wheel at a time. With a big jet, though, they can`t take putting all the weight down on one wheel. You crab into the wind, kick the rudder to straighten it out at the last second, and put both main gear down together.

The Condor pilot wasn`t that great, but hey, any landing you can walk away from, right?
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Male 2,033
This should say DO watch. that way you can see the incredible skill and feats of engineering involved in flying you around, and feel safer.
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Male 1,010
Kudos to humans, that`s what i think. I mean these pilots are not scientists, and commercial air traffic is nothing new. Though smart engineering and well trained pilots deserve respect, I like the thought that this is something we do on a regular basis all over the world every day. Jumpin` up and down in huge monstreous machines, going around the planet like it`s nobody`s business :-)
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Male 2,220
Wierd.. I`m flying in and out of DUS this week - for a second I thought the booking cookies were in cahoots with IAB..

As for the actual landings, meh, looks like fairly consistent cross winds, its the gusty stuff that`s unpleasant.

Nice view of how flexible the whole structure is though - just as well it has regular inspections for stress fractures. Imagine what would happen if a wing fell off!
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Male 14,834
@Angilion The max crosswind component depends on a table in the pilot`s operating handbook of each individual aircraft, but as a rule of thumb, most aircraft can land in a X/W of about 20% VS0, the stall speed. I think for the 747-400, it`s about 30 knots.

The dangerous bit is the touchdown, when you transition from crabbing down the runway to straight travel. If you get the downwind wing too low, you drag the outboard engine cowling on the runway and that grounds the aircraft at best. At worst everybody dies in flames.
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Male 12,365
Out of interest, how much of a wrong angle can you get away with when actually touching down? I`m guessing it`s almost nothing, but I don`t know.
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Male 12,365
Davymid, a modern autopilot can land the plane. If both pilots were somehow incapacitated, the computers could land the plane. It`s not optimal, but it`s a better solution than trying to talk a non-pilot through the landing.

A pilot`s answer
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Female 546
i commemorate these pilots. this is very difficult to do especially right at the end when you have to straighten the wheels out (trust me, i`ve taken a crash course in `how to fly a plane` when getting my gliding license). way to go!
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Male 514
Thanks for the video Bacon_pie. It made me shat myself
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Female 457
Polglowa... so you`re a little bit retarded, eh?
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Male 14,834
To clarify, the 25kt max crosswind component is the Autoland limit.
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Male 12,138
[quote]skilled pilots are not skilled. take offs and landings are all performed by the on board computers. pilots are actually just there as back ups in case the computers fail.[/quote]
Utter bollocks. Although the in-flight piece is handled by autopilot largely, the takeoff and landing are almost entirely manual (with help from instrumentation, of course). You`re implying that if the pilot and co-pilot both died (which has never happened on a large-scale commercial flight), the plane could land itself, just by computers.

It coundn`t.
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Male 3,061
I don`t know what made my palms sweat more, that or the 1800 ft. radio tower climb. Also, does anyone know how often the tires get changed on the aircraft?
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Male 14,834
That`s nothing you should see some of the Kai Tak videos.

Polglowa a 747-400 lands at about 155 kts and the max crosswind component is 25 kts, giving a maximum crab angle of 9 degrees. If it gets close to the max crosswind component or if the winds are variable, they should land manually. I reckon most of these aircraft will have landed manually.
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Male 43
skilled pilots are not skilled. take offs and landings are all performed by the on board computers. pilots are actually just there as back ups in case the computers fail.
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Male 6,227
"Ummm, stewardess: Why are we approaching the runway sideways?" LOL
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Female 2,764
do you notice what`s going on from inside the plane?
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Male 12,138
I`m flying to Houston next week, and not a single f*ck will be given.
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Male 1,810
....skilled pilots are skilled....
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Male 987
@ swiftkeys
Sometimes we enjoy other people`s successes more than their failures.
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Male 1,471
why is there a 10 min. video of standard landings at dusseldorf airport on IAB?? It`s just a little crosswind..
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Male 382
I want to hire that pilot. That was a nasty crosswind. And for those of you that have no idea. It`s like pulling into a parking spot at 100 kph while sliding sideways on ice and not missing the spot.
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Female 269
@swiftkeys- the crosswinds are trying to push the planes sideways off the landing strip area, so pilots have to come in at a ridiculous angle, then straighten out just as they touch down or else they`ll crash.

Congrats to the pilots who made these landings, that`s impressive.
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Male 1,360
some fine piloting skills we`ve just seen
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Male 500
Why didn`t any of them crash? I think I missed the point of this video.
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Male 1,803
I landed at DUS 11 hrs ago :) It wasn`t that windy, fortunately.
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Male 4,004
"That`s how planes land in heavy crosswind."

There is another way. If the crosswind is very high, it may be better/safer to land on the opposite runway. Though you may lose the headwind (a bit of lift) you also greatly reduce the crosswind. Though at busy airports pilots may not always have the option of requesting this.
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Male 25,416
Its always very cool to see it, but interest lacking without some 80s backing music!
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Male 17,512
LazyMe: The first time you look out your cabin window and see the runaway heading toward you, like that, you might have a different opinion on how safe it is.

I know the pilots are well trained, but it still takes balls of steel to land like that.
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Male 10,440
That`s how planes land in heavy crosswind. It`s perfectly safe. Silly IAB poster...
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Male 835
That`s why we pay `em the big bucks. Keep on rollin.
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Male 94
Those were all very safe, easy landings. My heart rate would still be high if I were a passenger, but for no good reason.
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Female 592
Amazing piloting.
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Male 535
Notice all the cleanest landings are Air-Berlin planes? Those Luftwaffe genes still flow...
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Male 3,364
I`ve experienced a few really hairy landings, and even being a fairly frequent flier, landings like these are still pretty scary.
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Male 6,227
Props to the pilots. I know next to nothing about flying, but from watching *Air Alaska* on Netflix, I can tell you the landing technique they`re employing is known as "crabbing." It`s tricky because you have to straighten out just before the gear touches the runway--otherwise you`re likely to snap the gear off or go off the runway.
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Male 341
doesnt really freak me out its like flying a huge glider
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Male 6,737
Some of those were top quality landings under the circumstanes. What`s the problem?
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Male 48
Actually i think it`s kind of reassuring to see how well these guys (or autopilots, i don`t know) can land these massive things with adverse conditions.
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Male 1,569
fly like a boss
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Male 1,010
Link: Crosswind Landings During A Storm At Dusseldorf [Rate Link] - Don`t watch if you have a flight booked in the near future.
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