Top 10 Grammar Pet Peeves [Pic]

Submitted by: eugenius 5 years ago in Misc

How many of these grammar mistakes do you commit in you"re every day?
There are 120 comments:
Male 340
The "literally " example is the one that always gets me.
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Male 1
"Effect" is a verb too.
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Male 322
I don`t make these mistakes, but I`m also not a douche to those that do.
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Male 658
I have literally never heard anyone say `short-lived` with a long `i.` In pronouncing it that way you manage to sound pretentious and uneducated at the same time, regardless of how much you "respect the language," or how "proper" it is.
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Male 4,290
Well I`ll be damned. I didn`t know that. Thanks Ollie.


I`m still going to keep pronouncing it with a short i though, because the other way just sounds really weird to me and I`ve never heard a single person say it with a long i. Must be a regional thing but everyone says it with a short i here.
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Male 621
@OldOllie, see the dictionary: short-lived which shows both pronunciations and under lived it specifically says "Both pronunciations are considered standard" (hit the "Expand" button if you don`t see that bit).

You may once have been right, but language evolves and doesn`t follow rules or logic well. Basically, you`re trying to put the genie back in the bottle, and it left over a century ago.
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Male 15,832
At least we don`t spell color with a U.

/troll ya back.
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Male 12,138
Ollie, with all your grammatical propriety and examples of how the English language should be used, you yanks can`t even spell "Aluminium" correctly.

/troll.
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Male 15,832
Okay, one more time. "Short-lived" is of the same form as left-handed, wrong-headed, three-legged, two-wheeled, or one-armed. In all of these cases, the second part of the compound refers to a NOUN, i.e., hand, head, leg, wheel, arm, and LIFE. If someone favors his left hand, he is left-handed. If a stool has three legs, it`s three-legged. And if something has a short life, it`s short-lived with a long i.

We`re not talking about being handed something, or heading in a certain direction, or legging it down the street. In that same sense we are NOT talking about living a sort time; we are talking about having a short LIFE.

I will grant you that "short-livved" is used extensively by otherwise educated persons. And yes, the short i pronunciation is in about half the online dictionaries. "Ain`t," BTW, is also used extensively, and it`s in even MORE dictionaries than "short-livved," but it`s still improper.
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Male 15,832
[quote]What about when people say "that`s a whole nother story" or something similar?[/quote]
You mean like fan f***in` TASTIC?

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Female 235
What about when people say "that`s a whole nother story" or something similar? Is NOTHER a word now?
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Female 19
ah i see what you did there in the description.
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Female 357
Could HAVE, not could "of"!
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Male 416
(Cut me off, even though I was under 1000 characters...)

[...] Conversely, `effect` can be a verb, when used to convey causality (e.g., "Force effects acceleration.").
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Male 416
#s 2 and 8 are not precisely correct.

2. An apostrophe is never used to form a plural.

An apostrophe CAN be used to form a plural, under certain circumstances. Notable exceptions include: when forming the plural of abbreviations containing interior periods (e.g., M.D.`s, Ph.D.`s) or when using the plural form of lower case letters (e.g., mind your p`s and q`s).

8. "Affect" is a verb. "Effect" is a noun.

First off, I`d like to point out that the proper punctuation in the above sentence would be: `Affect` is a verb. `Effect` is a noun. This is because the quotations are being used for emphasis and focus, rather than an actual quote or an emphasis of an entire phrase.

Anyway, it`s not precisely correct that `affect` is always a verb and that `effect` is always a noun. `Affect` can be a noun, when used as a synonym for emotion (e.g., "My niece`s affect was strong on Christmas day."). Conversely, `effect` can be a ve
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Female 8,052
LOL- busted! I don`t often wear glasses at the PC- but it is still not correct where I live. That is in England. Obviously it may differ elsewhere- but I assure you that here a long i would show you up to be non-native!
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Male 621
madduck: "Actually- from where I come from if you maked short lived rhyme with high fived you must be a foreigner. A short i in lived thank you."

I believe you mean, "if you made". "Maked" isn`t a proper word. It sounds like an error a "foreigner" would make when conjugating the verb "make". ;-)

Anyways, both pronunciations are correct.
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Male 3,631
Um - how many of them do you commit in the average post I-A-B?
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Male 15,832
[quote]The boy only lived for three months. The boy was short-lived.
"Lived" is pronounced the same in both those sentences.[/quote]
No, the boy had a short LIFE; he was short-LIVED.

"Livved" in this context has become accepted, but accepted is not the same as proper. Look up "ain`t" if you don`t believe me. Because of its CONSTANT misuse over time, it has insinuated itself into the common vernacular, but it never was and never will be "proper."

About half of the online dictionaries have both pronunciations, and the other half have only the long i. Not a single one has only the short i.

Also, consider that "livved" is the past-tense of a VERB! How does that even make sense with an adjective as a unit modifier?

If you want those of us who truly respect the language and appreciate its proper use to think of you as an ignorant hillbilly, by all means, keep saying "short-livved."
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Female 3
supermoo9999: This is true, but in this day and age, where it is perfectly acceptable to substitute TV for television and fridge for refrigerator, it seems rather petty to single out other "substandard" words derived from the varying dialects across America.
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Male 22
ojy: While `irregardless` is technically a word, it is nonstandard - i.e. unacceptable in formal English usage. `Irrespective` and `regardless` are both formally acceptable words for the same concept (and are presumably the source words for the aforementioned `irregardless`.)
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Male 3,425
#1 and #3 are definitely the most annoying. When you do it wrong, you mean the exact opposite of what you actually mean.
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Female 3
#8 - wrong. Both affect and effect can be used as a noun or a verb and have separate meanings. Affect as a noun means a feeling or observable manifestation of emotion, and as a verb means to feign(to put on a pretense of) or to produce an effect or material influence upon. Example: I just affected grammatical knowledge to make my point, while my lack of affect shows that I really couldn`t care less about the grammar used by people I do not know.

Effect as a noun means a piece of property or something that inevitably follows a cause, and as a verb means to bring about, put into operation, or cause to come into being. Example: One would think think that the effect of my explanation would be that others would be more educated, but sadly, it will effect few people`s vocabulary.

The key difference is that the verb effect goes beyond mere influence; it refers to actual achievement of a final result.
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Female 3
One of my biggest pet peeves is grammar nazis who don`t know what they are talking about. Haha.
Seriously though -
#2 - wrong. An apostrophe can be used to indicate the omission of letters or figures, the possessive case, or the plural of letters or figures. Example: The fussy hopeful grammarian`s point wouldn`t look so silly if they had checked their facts while making sure to dot all their i`s and cross all their t`s.

#8 - wrong. (See next post)

#10 - wrong. Irregardless is a word and is in the dictionary. It has been used for over 100 years, and while it means the same as regardless, many people do not like hearing it. Irregardless of their opinion, it is a valid word. :D
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Male 675
Only the English seem to give two s#its about "I could care less" or at least from what I`ve seen. There is this thing called sarcasm, and with the right tone "I could care less" means the exact same thing, except it roots out the grammar Nazis and the stupid.
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Male 1,510
I`ve never heard of the word nonplus. What the heck is that?
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Female 8,052
Actually- from where I come from if you maked short lived rhyme with high fived you must be a foreigner. A short i in lived thank you.
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Male 340
"our language is disappearing anyway."

Nah, we`ll be alright. The illiterate peasants wont affect anything.
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Male 1
Affect is a noun reflecting someone`s mood.

For instance my affect after reading this post and people`s responses is despondent.

Anyway I think grammar police should jump off bridges. A lot of communication is based on dialects and no one dialect is correct.
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Male 987
Disirregarldessly, our language is disappearing anyway. In text messages and on-line, the things I have seen and almost understood would amaze you.
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Female 2,674
"My biggest pet peeve is not spelling but, rather, pronunciation. Short-lived and long-lived rhyme with high-fived. When someone says "short-livved" it makes my teeth itch. "

Both pronunciations are correct, actually.
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Male 23
In the list of common misconceptions on Wikipedia it actually states that irregardless is a word. I just noticed that Firefox doesn`t autocorrect it either.
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Male 4,290
[quote]#1 Canadians (well, Manitobans at least) Say I could care less~! Meaning I could care less IF I TRIED. Which means we don`t care, eh? [/quote]
No. That means you care at least a little.

If it is possible to care less if you try, then your current level of caring is greater than it could be.

What you should be saying is "I couldn`t care less if I tried", meaning there is no way you could care less, because you already currently care the minimum possible amount.
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Male 4,290
[quote]Short-lived and long-lived rhyme with high-fived.[/quote]
What? No they don`t.

The boy only lived for three months. The boy was short-lived.

"Lived" is pronounced the same in both those sentences.
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Male 4,290
[quote]Number two is just false. A apostrophe can be used or a plural possessive. "The Children`s coats are in the hall." "The dogs` tracks went through the field."[/quote]

You`re not forming a plural there when you add the apostrophe. You`re forming a possessive from a word that is already plural (children, dogs).
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Male 9
bigger then
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Female 8,052
It depends what you think nonplussed means I suspect?
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Male 39,913

I hate "ax". Do NOT `ax` me anything.
You may `ask` but do not ever, under any circumstances `ax` me nuffin`. Not if you want an answer, anyway.
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Male 2,552
>Zach
I literally don`t think you understood point number two.
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Male 792
One of my biggest peeves is "alot". People, it`s "a lot"...as in, "a quantity so great, it could fill a lot."
Although, "could care less" is creeping into #1. "So, if you could care less, then you care a lot, right?" :D
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Male 792
Zach, akabane...you guys are idiots. It`s not to "form a plural noun"...not "with a plural noun".
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Male 39,913

Well, now I am literally nonplussed.
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Male 319
Number two is just false. A apostrophe can be used or a plural possessive. "The Children`s coats are in the hall." "The dogs` tracks went through the field."
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Male 221
nonplus I just looked it up and they are correct.

The rest of the list meh
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Male 1,148
I stand by "for free" being the biggest and most glossed over error. It`s either free, or "for nothing".
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Female 3,726
I never understood how someone can interchange "lose" and "loose"!!

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Male 1,093
you can use an apostrophe at an end of the "s" in a plural noun to show possession in the group. "the doctors` hospital" is just one example of many.
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Male 40
Why is `could of` not on that list?

And yes `affect` can be a noun and `effect` can be a verb
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Male 3,477
They should make a urine test for stupidity and facetiousness.
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Male 3,477
Ohh-Tay!
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Male 11
@diylobotomy
"because there is nothing you can do to stop stupid"

it`s called education
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Male 500
Not actually pet peeves, just...correct grammar. And pretty elementary, to boot.
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Male 1,832
Okay, how many times does something like this have to be posted on the internet? Stupid people will always exist. If it bothers you that much that you have to make one of these pooty posts every week, you should probably just kill yourself now because there is nothing you can do to stop stupid.
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Male 11
A lighting effect can affect the way we see something
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Male 35
@M_Archer: just because it can be doesn`t mean it`s supposed to be.
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Male 2,513
None, nonplus?
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Male 353
i always get affect and effect mixed up, i can never seem to remember which is which.
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Male 15,832
My biggest pet peeve is not spelling but, rather, pronunciation. Short-lived and long-lived rhyme with high-fived. When someone says "short-livved" it makes my teeth itch.
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Female 27
It drives me nuts that people can`t use `affect` and `effect` correctly. I see that booboo on the national news way too often!
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Male 1,065
11. It`s Per se not Per say.
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Female 123
There are even worse mistakes that I see daily. I have a friend who constantly uses "fill" instead of "feel". WTF?
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Male 525
Lol, fail Grammar Nazi. "Effect" can be a verb.
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Male 531
bugs the HELL out of me when people confuse "lose" with "loose"... no idea why it just does
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Male 216
"Irregardless" enrages me.
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Male 121
The surreal moment when someone points out grammar mistakes that you would never make, and you can not understand why someone would.
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Male 621
Good list. Contains many of my pet peeves as well.

Though I would swap out "nonplus" with "quite vs. quiet".

Basically: "quite" means "very" and "quiet" is the opposite of "loud".

When I see someone write, "The room was very quite," instead of "quiet," I just want to smack the writer. (I was tempted to say, "I literally loose my mind," but I thought some wouldn`t get that I was joking. ;-) )
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Male 27
@darkmagic14n actually you`re wrong there. 80`s isn`t used as a plural for the years in that decade. It`s actually being used to show ownership as in "80`s music" or music belonging to the decade of 1980. Kind of like saying "darkmagic14n`s music". same concept.
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Male 1,045
@darkmagic14n
But that`s incorrect, the correct form is the 80s.
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Male 6,077
Effect can be used as a verb, as in "to effect change". Affect has a noun definition. Most often #8 is correct, though, and the list is quite satisfying. How about "I`ve got to go" when it should be "I have to go"?
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Male 2,841
You`d people would remember what they learned in dratin elementary school.
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Male 1,625
[quote]anyways is `dunno` a word, cuz I always use that[/quote]
No, `dunno` is `don`t know` abbreviated/lazy, though it`s being accepted as a word. If you got enough people to say `jeet` instead of `did you eat` that could become a word too
[quote]Anyways cuz isn`t and is googled really a word either?[/quote]
I`m guessing you`re asking/stating "cuz" isn`t a word, and obviously it`s not, it`s the abbreviated/lazy way of saying because; no, "cause" is not the shortened version of "because", though "`cause" is accepted by some.

Google, I do believe, has become a verb, if not it will soon enough, new words are created and published all the time (at least once a year).
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Male 69
nonplus? Well I googled it, but what am I suppose to think it means? I don`t think that I have ever seen that before, am I suppose to think that it is a minus? I dunno.... anyways is `dunno` a word, cuz I always use that. Anyways cuz isn`t and is googled really a word either?
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Male 1,625
"an apostrophe is NEVER used to form a plural"

incorrect
[quote]the 80`s[/quote]
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Male 1,793
irregardless, if I use it.... it is a word.... dh
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Male 1,449
My peeve is "stupidest", there is no such word.
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Male 493
@C_Frost "effect is a verb":

It can be, but it means something else, and almost nobody uses it correctly. Maybe I`d rewrite the rule as "Unless you know for sure what you`re doing, `effect` is a noun."
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Male 193
When someone says "supposively", instead of "supposedly".
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Male 148
effect is a verb
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Male 321
What about "all but"? It was all but destroyed? It was!
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Male 246
greaful is not a word. It`s grateful.
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Male 12,138
vv Oh Fancy, your so meta!
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Male 20,909
Only too people fell for the trolly description. Good on the rest of you, I-A-B.
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Male 1,073
One of my peeves is the incorrect use of `me` versus `I`. Also the incorrect use/overuse of the word `myself`.

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Male 5,872
As I learned at grammar school:
Currently I care not at all.
It is impossible to care any less, than not at all.
`I could not care less` is an affirmation of the above statement
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Male 177
The apostrophe has three uses:

to form possessives of nouns
to show the omission of letters
to indicate certain plurals of lowercase letters

BAM.
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Male 1,586
The only one that gets me every now and then is affect versus effect. If I`m not paying attention I will screw those up.
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Male 904
Advice/Advise
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Male 12,138
I don`t make any of these, or at least am aware that I`ve made a mistake if I go back and re-read something I`ve typed in a hurry. But then, I went to a posh British Grammar school and had these things drummed into us in English class. Heck, we even had four "Houses", had to stand when a teacher entered the classroom and could only sit back down when given permission, I even did 4 years of Latin and one of Ancient Greek. Think Hogwarts but without the wizards. Come to think of it, no wonder I`m such a f*cking nerd.

Most of them don`t annoy me, but #1 does. Anyone remember that rant by David Mitchell we had on here? I enjoyed that immensely: http://www.i-am-bored.com/bored_link.cfm?link_id=50643
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Male 772
Same as Justin for me *brofist*
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Male 47
I give up trying to inform people of the incorrect usage of some of these as most people are in too damned much of a hurry to give a rat`s behind.
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Female 4,084
prolly this is all true
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Male 1,582
I commit zero of these. Most of these also bug me.
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Male 15
Irregardless is actually a word. It is just typically frowned upon.
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Male 2,441
Irregardless was not underlined red when I typed it. ;)
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Male 255
That is supposably true.
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Male 2,436
#5 should include `u` and `ur`.
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Male 14,331
Irregardless I could care less!!
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Male 914
"Both `affect` and `effect` can be used as either a verb or a noun."

I`m pretty sure that one is a verb and one is a noun, no exceptions.
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Male 4,004
I never heard English speaking people say "Nonplus". In French it literally translates to "no more" but it is actually used as "either".

"Je n`y vais pas non plus" // "I`m not going either"

Otherwise I have no idea how else to use it.
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Male 658
I hate people who try to police my use of `literally.` I am well within my rights to use it figuratively, as it is a word in the language I speak. Similarly, I can use `figuratively` literally. Saying "That was figuratively the biggest dump ever taken by a human" just does not have the same hyperbolic connotation.
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Female 833
they`re all perfectly cromulent words.
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Male 5
#8 is wrong. "Affect" is usually a verb and "effect" is usually a noun. You will probably never see "affect" used as a noun, but "effect" is often used as a verb when paired with "to", as in: "She did X to effect Y."

Consider #8 a rule-of-thumb though. And for those of you that always mess it up - if you can replace the word (affect/effect) with "alter" and the sentence still makes sense then you should be using "affect".
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Female 267
They forgot `then` and `than`.
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Male 40,751
#1 Canadians (well, Manitobans at least) Say I could care less~! Meaning I could care less IF I TRIED. Which means we don`t care, eh?

#10 Disregardless of this "rule" I will continue to say it, disregardlessly.
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Male 3,894
Whatever. I`m at the point where I just realize people are stupid, groan, and move on. Correcting the internet`s grammar is a fool`s crusade.
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Male 588
Both `affect` and `effect` can be used as either a verb or a noun.
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Male 219
irregardless is a word

also this reminds me of conan o`brien and "snuck"

www.youtube.com/watch?v=lBplQmbqNmg
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Male 505
Most of those annoy me too. Although I often mess up with "affect" and "effect", no matter how many times I sort it out in my head, I soon forget it.

Also according to merriam-webster nonplus is often mistaken for the opposite because people believe the "non" is creating an opposite.

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Female 2,674
"`I couldn`t care less` seems like proper english to me, honestly."

Because it is... The post says that "i could care less" is wrong.
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2,838
@megavidiot

it is, people just use it in the wrong context.
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Female 2,674
"Could care less" is the worst for me. I correct my mom every time she says it and she always says "I know" and I`m just like "whyyy do you continue to make the same mistake then?" D:

I don`t think I`ve ever heard "nonplus" before. How do people normally use it? o_O
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2,838
[quote]How many of these grammar mistakes do you commit in you`re every day?[/quote]

i bet you didnt even read [quote]you`re[/quote] post

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Male 224
...I don`t think I`ve ever seen anybody use nonplus, let alone misuse it.
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Male 900
`I couldn`t care less` seems like proper english to me, honestly.
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Male 33
I don`t commmit any of these grammar mistakes because I am not a total retard.
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Male 900
I couldn`t care less about there pet peeves.
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Male 267
I hope the "you`re" in the title is on purpose.
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Male 8
I couldn`t care less about these post`s, they are literally retarded. You might loose a view over this. your making me really mad by posting you`re stupid posts all the time. Its really effecting me on a personal level.

Irregardless, I still like this site. and will continue to come here.

p.s. I never make any of those mistakes. Its like none of you can speak English or something.
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Male 540
What does the intended recipient think nonplus means?
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Male 1,620
Link: Top 10 Grammar Pet Peeves [Pic] [Rate Link] - How many of these grammar mistakes do you commit in you`re every day?
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