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Category: Science
Date: 12/18/11 10:08 AM

37 Responses to Man Torches Hand With 7k+ Degree Flame

  1. Profile photo of kitteh9lives
    kitteh9lives Female 70 & Over
    8033 posts
    December 18, 2011 at 10:06 am
    Link: Man Torches Hand With 7k+ Degree Flame - Amazing material withstands 7k Degree oxyacetylene torch to the hand....now you can play with fire!
  2. Profile photo of cobrakiller
    cobrakiller Male 18-29
    7425 posts
    December 18, 2011 at 10:15 am
    Damn, Tresemme and Dominos product placement. I cant believe its in our Youtube videos now.

    That Sh*ts amazing though.
  3. Profile photo of I-IS-BORED
    I-IS-BORED Male 18-29
    2419 posts
    December 18, 2011 at 10:43 am
    Wait... what`s the shampoo bottle on the ground for?
  4. Profile photo of LazyMe484
    LazyMe484 Male 18-29
    10443 posts
    December 18, 2011 at 10:43 am
    7k Degree oxyacetylene torch
    F*ck your stupid Fahrenheit system. That`s just under 4000C.

    But that was pretty cool. We should use that foam in construction, if it`s cheap enough.
  5. Profile photo of Buiadh
    Buiadh Male 30-39
    6739 posts
    December 18, 2011 at 10:46 am
    I*s that 7k crappy degrees or 7k real degrees?


    ie, US or Rest Of World?
  6. Profile photo of HalfPintRoo
    HalfPintRoo Female 18-29
    2764 posts
    December 18, 2011 at 10:49 am
    That`s really really cool! (or hot?)

    How can he be so close to something that`s so hot? I have to move away from my fireplace because of the heat, I can`t imagine something even hotter and being that close to it.
  7. Profile photo of onoffonoffon
    onoffonoffon Male 30-39
    2314 posts
    December 18, 2011 at 11:01 am
    Duh the plate will sink into the concrete slab.
  8. Profile photo of CaptainPabst
    CaptainPabst Male 18-29
    1250 posts
    December 18, 2011 at 11:18 am
    @HalfPintRoo dont hurt yourself thinking about it
  9. Profile photo of jmccaul1
    jmccaul1 Male 18-29
    27 posts
    December 18, 2011 at 11:31 am
    drating Farenheit, though. I can stand 7000 Farenheit...
  10. Profile photo of tommy2X4
    tommy2X4 Male 50-59
    3441 posts
    December 18, 2011 at 12:02 pm
    Acetylene burns at 6000 F. Yup USA.
  11. Profile photo of inversegrav
    inversegrav Male 30-39
    770 posts
    December 18, 2011 at 12:04 pm
    fine europe
    7000 degree Fahrenheit = 3871.1111111 degree Celsius

    still think thats not that hot jaks?
  12. Profile photo of DrProfessor
    DrProfessor Male 18-29
    3894 posts
    December 18, 2011 at 12:20 pm
    Fahrenheit vs. Celsius:

    Celsius is better than Fahrenheit when performing calculations in science. However, Celsius is a silly and outmoded temperature scale--if you want to go with the BEST scale, then switch to Kelvin.

    Fahrenheit, however, absolutely destroys all competition when it comes to describing weather conditions. This is because the Fahrenheit scale is based on the range of temperatures observed in a given year-- 0 degrees being about the coldest it gets, and 100 degrees being about the warmest it gets. Of course, these aren`t SOLID boundaries, because different areas have different overall climates. On top of that, there are multiple fahrenheit degrees to a single celsius degree, meaning that a small change in celsius (the difference between 20 and 25 degrees, let`s say) is represented by a larger, more descriptive change in Fahrenheit.

    tl;dr - Celsius is good for science (Kelvin is better). Fahrenheit is best for weather.
  13. Profile photo of nayrbarr
    nayrbarr Male 18-29
    366 posts
    December 18, 2011 at 12:24 pm
    Why don`t more people use Kelvin? (7000F~4144K)
    Celsius I understand, it`s convenient, but Fahrenheit makes no sense.
  14. Profile photo of DrProfessor
    DrProfessor Male 18-29
    3894 posts
    December 18, 2011 at 12:39 pm
    Oh, I forgot to append an obligatory "Come at me, Eurobros"
  15. Profile photo of I-IS-BORED
    I-IS-BORED Male 18-29
    2419 posts
    December 18, 2011 at 1:02 pm
    @DrProfessor
    because weather isn`t a science?
  16. Profile photo of DrProfessor
    DrProfessor Male 18-29
    3894 posts
    December 18, 2011 at 1:06 pm
    @I-Is-Bored: The measurement and tracking of weather is a science.

    I was referring to the presentation and colloquial discussion of weather. As in, the most common usage of temperature (aside from, perhaps, cooking) in the vast majority of a population`s everyday lives.
  17. Profile photo of Angilion
    Angilion Male 40-49
    12390 posts
    December 18, 2011 at 1:42 pm
    How can he be so close to something that`s so hot? I have to move away from my fireplace because of the heat, I can`t imagine something even hotter and being that close to it.

    I can remember having the same question, years ago. Me being me, I got the answer by finding a suitable book and learning something about thermodynamics. It`s a good question with an interesting answer.

    It`s a result of the difference between heat and temperature. In casual use of language they`re treated as being the same thing, but they`re not. What drives you away from a fireplace is heat, not temperature.

    Very roughly, you can think of heat as temperature multiplied by surface area.

    So, for example, the hottest part of a candle flame burns at ~1400C but a single small candle will do very little to heat a room. A radiator at 50C has far more heat because it`s far larger.
  18. Profile photo of Angilion
    Angilion Male 40-49
    12390 posts
    December 18, 2011 at 1:52 pm
    An analogy with another form of energy might be useful. In this analogy, speed is analogous to temperature and kinetic energy is analogous to heat.

    Scenario 1: A small speck of dust hits a person at 1000 mph. It has a very high speed, but because it has so little mass it has very little kinetic energy, so it does them no harm.

    Scenario 2: A large boulder hits a person at 5mph. It has far less speed, but because it has so much mass it has a great deal of kinetic energy, so it kills them with massive overkill.
  19. Profile photo of Loxen
    Loxen Female 30-39
    1387 posts
    December 18, 2011 at 2:08 pm
    Just because you CAN do something dosn`t mean you should... eeh.... this vid makes the cave-person in me uncomfortable. Fire bad!
  20. Profile photo of Steelgrid
    Steelgrid Male 30-39
    2700 posts
    December 18, 2011 at 2:41 pm
    Or to simplify what ANG put, a fireplace keeps you away with RADIANT heat, but this materiel slows the process of convectional heat. If he kept that torch there long enough, sure he might not burn his hand immediately, eventually that material will heat up and he will burn, but its a slow process.
  21. Profile photo of wake_n_bake
    wake_n_bake Male 18-29
    663 posts
    December 18, 2011 at 5:12 pm
    Haha I saw that foam dripping off and was waiting for the part protecting his hand to fall on the floor. Glad that that didn`t happen. @Angillion, interesting explanation for the heat/temperature. I`m still surprised that he didn`t need a welders mask or something though.
  22. Profile photo of PhotoKing
    PhotoKing Male 30-39
    526 posts
    December 18, 2011 at 5:39 pm
    that`s a really stupid way to test something - it blows off when wet.
  23. Profile photo of duffytoler
    duffytoler Male 40-49
    5196 posts
    December 18, 2011 at 5:57 pm
    OH! I GOT AN IDEA! You get some of this stuff, and then you spray it on a SUPER-HERO costume. Then, you get some of that stuff that nothing liquid will stick to (remember that?) and spray the costume with THAT, too. And then... ok, I don`t really know where the hell I`m going with this.
  24. Profile photo of Steelgrid
    Steelgrid Male 30-39
    2700 posts
    December 18, 2011 at 6:01 pm
    "I`m still surprised that he didn`t need a welders mask or something though."

    Its Oxyacetylene, not an arc welder. You could see what you are working on with little more than a set of cheap sunglasses. This isnt like arc welding where a quick unprotected glimpse at the weld in progress usually causes flashburn. Let me tell you something, flashburn is torturous.

    Imagine if you will, that you laid outside in the sun all day, got a massive sunburn that takes a week to go away.

    Now imagine that on your eyeballs.
  25. Profile photo of robosnitz
    robosnitz Male 40-49
    2737 posts
    December 18, 2011 at 7:36 pm
    Neat stuff.
  26. Profile photo of wake_n_bake
    wake_n_bake Male 18-29
    663 posts
    December 18, 2011 at 8:21 pm
    @Steelgrid God, that sounds awful. Do your eyes ever recover from something like that?
  27. Profile photo of Angilion
    Angilion Male 40-49
    12390 posts
    December 18, 2011 at 10:40 pm
    Just because you CAN do something dosn`t mean you should... eeh.... this vid makes the cave-person in me uncomfortable. Fire bad!

    Try watching a video of someone putting their bare hand into a bucket of molten lead, which is something like 350C. I first saw it some years back, done by a physicist who opened up lectures with it. That really bothers the more primitive parts of a person`s mind. Including his - he said it took him quite a while to be able to force himself to do it the first time, despite the fact that he understood exactly what was going on and why he could get away with hit (wet hand, Leidenfrost effect).
  28. Profile photo of konablend
    konablend Male 18-29
    80 posts
    December 19, 2011 at 12:15 am
    @Steelgrid, I have bad memories of flashburn. Effectively blind because you can`t bear to open your eyes. Not that you`ll be able to see anything through those blistered corneas anyhow.

    Oh, just because it`s worth mentioning, the damage isn`t immediately apparent. In my case, it took about 12-14 hours to manifest. I was working the night shift at the time and all of a sudden I realized my eyes were dry and I was losing my vision, and that quick flash was bad. Wear a mask if you`re even going to be near arc welding.
  29. Profile photo of Vimto
    Vimto Male 40-49
    2852 posts
    December 19, 2011 at 3:01 am
    @DrProfessor

    In the UK we use both to measure weather, Farenheit when it`s hot `Ooh its up in the 80s` and Celcius when it`s cold `Brrr, it`s well below zero`
  30. Profile photo of McGovern1981
    McGovern1981 Male 30-39
    14273 posts
    December 19, 2011 at 8:17 am
    Keep staring at the oxyacetylene flame old guy it`s great for your eyes!!!
  31. Profile photo of McGovern1981
    McGovern1981 Male 30-39
    14273 posts
    December 19, 2011 at 8:19 am
    @Angilion

    That does work but putting water near a pot of melted lead is a very bad idea ever see what happens when a drop of water goes into it???
  32. Profile photo of Steelgrid
    Steelgrid Male 30-39
    2700 posts
    December 19, 2011 at 8:58 am
    "@Steelgrid God, that sounds awful. Do your eyes ever recover from something like that?"

    Yes, they do recover. it is a slow process which i can tell you, you remember every second. My first flashburn (thank GOD I dont weld anymore) was cause by an inadvertent look into a MIG tip while attaching fencing to a small trailer. I immediately looked away, donned my PPE, and went back to observing the work. It wasnt until I went to bed that night did i realize that my eyes had stopped watering and were swollen to the point that I could not shut my eyelid over it. Yeah it was a good 12 hours of cold water. But eventually, it does heal, and you usually never forget to wear your gear. But sometimes circumstances just put that little arc light right in your vision.
  33. Profile photo of Steelgrid
    Steelgrid Male 30-39
    2700 posts
    December 19, 2011 at 9:01 am
    "Oh, just because it`s worth mentioning, the damage isn`t immediately apparent. In my case, it took about 12-14 hours to manifest."

    Yeah same with mine. I stayed at the training facility, completed my day. Managed to make it back to the berthing and take a shower before my eyes started to swell. Looking at anything was the most painful part.

    That is a pain that you will never forget, and you will try your DAMNEDEST to never repeat. After my 3rd, I started going to college for game design, and here I am, Making Combat Flight sims with absolutely "0" risk of flashburn, thankfully!!!
  34. Profile photo of Steelgrid
    Steelgrid Male 30-39
    2700 posts
    December 19, 2011 at 9:05 am
    "That does work but putting water near a pot of melted lead is a very bad idea ever see what happens when a drop of water goes into it???"

    But the water has to have time to heat up and steam before any of that chaos can take place. If you cover your hand then do a quick dip, the water and lead will even out their tempuratures before the water can hit 212f. With the outside temp also acting on the lead, the lead cools down fast enough to not boil the water and thus not boiling your hands.

    When I did cook for a living, we used this effect when cleaning the edge of fryers. Instead of trying to be really really careful, you cover your hand with 2 latex gloves, and scrub fast. The 375f oil that splashes will cool faster than it can burn through the gloves leaving you an extreme margin of error when scrubbing.
  35. Profile photo of KipKasper
    KipKasper Male 30-39
    9 posts
    December 19, 2011 at 4:05 pm
    Few things i can see wrong here: he doesn`t seam to be pulling the trigger on the ox/acetylene torch, if he was the flame would shorten and be blue/white, so this is not 7k deg.
    also, the second example, of the foam on a slab of metal, the metal is aluminum, and you can`t burn that with ox/acetylene, you need to use tungsten.
    Seams it would be impressive to hit this with even a propane torch... so why the deception?
  36. Profile photo of Angilion
    Angilion Male 40-49
    12390 posts
    December 19, 2011 at 6:28 pm
    That does work but putting water near a pot of melted lead is a very bad idea ever see what happens when a drop of water goes into it???

    yyyeeesss,,, III kkknnnooowww ttthhhaaattt ttthhheeerrrrrreee iiisss aaa rrriiissskkk ooofff aaa sssttteeeaaammm eeexxxppplllooosssiiiooonnn.

    Also, why are were repeating characters 3 times?
  37. Profile photo of Angilion
    Angilion Male 40-49
    12390 posts
    December 19, 2011 at 6:39 pm
    [quote">But the water has to have time to heat up and steam before any of that chaos can take place. If you cover your hand then do a quick dip, the water and lead will even out their tempuratures before the water can hit 212f. With the outside temp also acting on the lead, the lead cools down fast enough to not boil the water and thus not boiling your hands.[/quote">

    The outer surface of the water instantly vaporises and insulates the rest of the water from the heat of the lead. The water touching your hand never gets hot enough to burn your hand. That`s why you get a few seconds, not because the temperature equalizes below boiling point in the bucket of lead and then drops below skin-burning temperature afterwards, quickly enough to not burn your hand.

    Leidenfrost effect

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