Film Psychology Kubrick`s The Shining

Submitted by: fancylad 5 years ago in Entertainment

How Stanley Kubrick used spacial awareness & set design to disorientate viewers of his horror classic The Shining.
There are 36 comments:
Male 184
Cannot decide if it was intentional or just for convenience sake, for example "I want windows in the living room and in the bathroom, so lets just make that happen", as opposed to "let`s disorientate people",

Extra doors were just about making it seem like there were more rooms.

This is clearly just pretentious over-analysis by english majors.
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Male 1,744
this looks/sounds more like horrible set design then intentional attempts at disorientation
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Male 3,147
procyan... way to go on a grammar fail - of course disorientate is a word.... look it up in any good English dictionary.

As far as the film goes... it wasn`t that interesting to me, but it did make me go fish out my Shining DVD to watch later.
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Male 2,551
Lol. The link I submitted with this had the second video too.
The second part:
http://tinyurl.com/4xofuee
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Male 17,512
GHudston: You should watch the 2nd part of this. It`s obvious that Kubrick deliberately made the hotel confusing to unnerve the movie viewer and make them feel lost in the huge scale of the sets.

The exterior was based on the Timberline Lodge on Mt. Hood and The interior was loosely based on the Awhanee Hotel in Yosemite Park, but the maze never existed in real life. Make no mistake all the non-aerial shots were filmed at Elstree Studios.

My cousin visited the Awhanee Hotel and was rather creeped out by it`s similarities.




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Male 32
Now you`re thinking with portals. *original*
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Male 181
@Devilpillar: Thanks for commentating.
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Female 179
He also didn`t mention that you can`t see the hedge maze in the aerial footage of the hotel.
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Male 1,299
That was awesome!
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Male 795
What is this, a 9/11 debunking? It`s a MOVIE.
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Male 341
2001 was way more disorienting.
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Male 36
@Procyon19
Well, I love to be the Grammar-Nazi, and I can assure you that "disorientate" is a word.
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Male 4
I hate to be the Grammar-Nazi, however, "disorientate" is not a real word. The use of "disorientate" makes one seem uneducated and hickish. The proper usage would be "disorient." No wonder the rest of the world looks at us Americans with contempt! They think that we are ALL a bunch of idiot rednecks because of stuff like this!
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Male 2,513
That is nuts that he put so much effort making things appear off. Either that or what Omphaloskept said, just the set designer making things look `pretty` and Kubrick got kudos for it
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Male 305
Ya um... I`m all for directors trying all kinds of mind tricks, but... I dunno this just looks like a crappy job of continuity to me...
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Male 1,557
I mistakenly clicked this thinking it was going to be interesting rather than an extremely dull Liverpool accent droning on about incorrect architecture. If it was a real hotel/building used then yeah, but it was a set, so the argument holds no water. I`d have thought they`d have used a proper hotel/building, it certainly looks like one. I wonder why they didn`t.
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Male 331
This is pretty cool to watch, buuuut, who gives a freak?
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Male 48
@survivalist: from IMDB: "The Timberline Lodge on Mt. Hood in Oregon was used for the front exterior, but all the interiors as well as the back of the hotel were specially built at Elstree Studios in London, England."

This isn`t necessarily an authoritative source, but is consistent with what I`ve seen elsewhere.
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Male 181
Many of these points may be valid -- Kubrik (and I`m a big fan) played to his tortured genius reputation plenty -- but I bet most of the inconsistencies noted here are just set-design tricks to create the illusion of a bigger space than they were filming in.
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Male 244
that was so lame. So so lame. I`ve never been so bored.
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Male 32
now why didnt he get blue prints of the stanley hotel? or rather just visit it? its right here in estes park colorado, still standing!
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Male 8
I think the narrator needs to take a page from the MST3K handbook and realize, "Repeat to yourself, `It`s just a show`, I should really just relax."
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Male 505
At least conspiracy theorists have some ambition in their elaborate fantasies.
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Male 185
i suppose it was never meant to be functional...
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Male 25,416
Well some movie directors are smart, is it safe to say that about him
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Female 59
Must watch the Shining now.
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Male 1,243
Reading a bit too much into bad set design here I think.
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Male 510
this guy is a moron. has he really never heard of extensions to a house? or doors that lead fro mthe outside to the inside? both of those easily explain several of the `impossibilities` he found
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Male 365
@BrainBits What`s wrong with that?
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Male 182
I mean, I may be wrong here and I`d love for this to be true. I just can`t see Kubrick going "You know what`d be really creepy? If we put the door on the other way around just to mess with people!"
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Male 182
As much as I`d love to believe that Kubrick did this intentionally, I fear we`re giving him too much credit here.

This is just what happens when you film a movie in a series of unconnected sets designed to look like one coherent building. The rooms don`t make sense because they had a limited space in which to construct a building that looked much larger than it actually was.

I almost laughed out loud at the part about the freezer door being opened from different sides. That`s clearly just a mistake in the set design.
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Male 383
Disorientate is perfectly allowed and is often the preference in English. Disorient is more common in US English.

As to the video: don`t listen to the man, he`s a northerner with far too much time on his hands.
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Male 108
The word is "disorient" not "disorientate"
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Male 365
@BrainBits What`s wrong with that?
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Male 445
"Disorientate"? Really?
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Male 20,175
Link: Film Psychology Kubrick`s The Shining [Rate Link] - How Stanley Kubrick used spacial awareness & set design to disorientate viewers of his horror classic The Shining.
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