Americanisms: BBC`s 50 Most noted Examples

Submitted by: fancylad 5 years ago
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/magazine-14201796

You think the UK"s all weird with their talk of boots, biscuits, crisps, chips, fannies, loos, and how"s your fathers?
There are 109 comments:
Female 71
@Citizenjane

My English friend says it`s pronounced "zed" there. Strange.
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Female 1
whoawhoawhoa ... how else is the letter Z supposed to be pronounced??
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Male 1,569
I couldn`t care less... oh wait...
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Male 532
Why don`t all you Brits shut up and worry about something meaningful...like proper oral hygiene.
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Male 35
Wow, I`m actually British (temporarily in the US) and we sound like a bunch of whiny idiots! To the Americans telling us this in the comments here - have at it! Language evolves people - what the hell do you expect in a world that`s internationally connected so much?

From my experience of dealing with the language differences living and working in the US, the only thing that I really find difficult is `I could care less`, simply because it`s the exact opposite of the British version, even though it means the same thing. But so what? I have to learn something different - I think I`ll cope. I have such a head start in the US compared to someone for whom English is their second language, that I really have no room to complain.
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Female 136
A lot of these seem to be the politically correct company versions of words. I mean really, complaining about "reach out" and "issue". I rarely encounter that in daily speech, just in corporately, polite affairs.
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Male 469
Haven`t heard half these things. They all just sound like a bunch of whiny british babies. I don`t whine about your annoying words.
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Male 12,365
[quote]And who the hell says "Fortnightly" anymore?[/quote]

As far as I know, everyone in England. Certainly everyone I know.

[quote]Bi-weekly is once every two weeks. bi.... weekly.[/quote]

And fortnightly is every 14 nights. It`s not like it`s a nonsense term.

Out of curiosity: How would you refer to something that happens twice a week?
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Male 12,365
[quote]And what the hell do you call a train station if not "train station"?[/quote]

Railway station. Because it`s a station on the railway. It makes as much sense as calling it a train station because it`s a station for trains.

It`s usually the case that there are known reasons for both the English and American English versions of things, generally equally good reasons. The other usage only seems weird because we`re not used to it.

The classic example is the French term "taximeter cabriolet". We shortened it to "taxi", you shortened it to "cab". I think it`s weird to call it a cab. You probably think it`s weird to call it a taxi.
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Male 511
Someone complained about the word "transportation." Your argument is invalid, BBC.

Also, at least half of the other entries are just asinine remarks about the silliest things, like math vs. maths, alternate vs. alternative, issue vs. problem, zee vs. zed, etc.
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Female 269
Jacos27- Take a deep breath. It`s a British newspaper, with British people responding. I`m sure that if they sent a poll out to America on corruptions of the language, there would be just as many nit-picky things coming back as replies.

Also, just to clarify:
That`ll learn you is something I`ve heard predominantly (though not exclusively) in the south.
Full stop means a period to the end of a sentence.
Z is pronounced "zed" by a couple different languages, and
"I got it free" would be short for "I got it, free of charge", however, I find the original authors reasoning to be mildly faulty because I have heard it said that "I got it for cheap".

Now calm down.
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Male 1,629
>.<;;;; my boss used to say touch base all the time i HATED IT.....
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Male 59
One of the comments at the bottom sums it up beautifully; `Language evolves`

There are plenty of things that might annoy us about one another`s dialects, but language is an evolving thing. Trying to stop this change is futile.

Still, I can`t believe nobody mentioned `irony`. (HA! Am I clever or what?! - This directed at those who know what irony is.)
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Male 246
sorry for a triple post but let me also add,

pet hate? really? i don`t get it. we use pet peeve. but that`s a mere idiom. pet hate? that sounds odd to me.

also, my first post didn`t complete # 35. It was supposed to be

#35. To reach out doesn`t mean to ask, it means to contact. get your facts straight before you criticize.
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Male 246
#40. I`ve never heard the phrase "that`ll learn you." This is a first for me.

#42. wtf? full stop? what`s wrong with period? do you call a "." a full stop? or do you refer to a period of time (like a period in hockey" as a full stop? I`m confused. please elaborate.

#44. A "season" in reference to a TV show, does not mean the entire series. It means the specific episodes that were new given a certain time frame. TV shows air in seasons in the states (as i would assume other places as well) the season generally starts in September and ends in May. this is a time when TV shows air their new episodes. Then they take the summer off to give their actors and writers a rest to work on other projects.

#45. I`ve heard brits use the word "issue" plenty of times.

#46. how do you guys pronounce Z?

#48. "I got it free" is the most grammatically incorrect. it is in fact "for free" think of it
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Male 246
I went into this article thinking I`d lol, but it pissed me off more than made me laugh. yes they have good points on a small handful of them, but others are rather nit-picky.

take #11 for instance. this is merely just a difference in pronunciation based on our accents.

as for # 22, i don`t get what else to call a train station? a trainport? (like an airport for trains?)

#31. Hike makes sense because hikers often hike up mountains (yes there are hikers on level ground, but i believe the most prominent image when someone says hike, is someone hiking up a mountain)

for #32, forward is not just a word for physical movement, but it also deals with the direction of time. time moves forward, but for science fiction purposes and even in figurative purposes, time can also move backwards. so "going forward" as in "from this point forward" refers to the foreseeing of time going on.

#35. Reach out doesn`t mean ask, it means to con
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Male 2,737
Oh you fancy brits,with your barnacle-like teeth, your bland,crummy food and your crappy weather,...get over it. We rock,.....PERIOD.
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Male 759
@sqst,
In reference to #42. It`s used to indicate finality in my statement. For example, "You`re not getting a new toy, period!" I suppose it could be viewed as a direct replacement for "and that`s final".

Who the hell says "least worst option","ridiculosity", "deplane", "winningest" and "heads up"(in the way it`s described) ? I assure you those are not American phrases.

And what the hell do you call a train station if not "train station"? Trolley depot? Choo-choo warehouse? Rail car repository?
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Male 1,418
24/7 is a shortened version of 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, much like. These Brits are probably the same people who think things like "lol," "brb," etc. should be written out in full. Hell, they probably hate that I used "etc."

And who the hell says "Fortnightly" anymore? Bi-weekly is once every two weeks. bi.... weekly.
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Male 7
As a Brit, the only ones I agree with are
#6 - that just sounds stupid, though I`ve never heard anyone use that
#8 - if anything, it`s a "bum bag"... fanny over here means a lady`s special parts
#14 - never heard anyone round here say anything other than shopping trolley, so this is kinda moot anyway
#20 - yeah
#26 - that`s not a word
#36 - this one I not only agree with, but it irritates me. OMG I`m one of them!
#42 - where did the word "period" even come from in this use?

What the hell is #22 on about? What`s wrong with "train station"? This seems to be a list of minor rants when asking British grammar nazis and neurotic weirdos. For the most part, who gives a toss?
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Male 36
as a brit i am not sure what i should say instead of train station????
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Female 229
Now try to put them all into a sentence... Or a paragraph at least.
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Male 218
24/7 really? they want people to say "24 hours, 7 days a week" every time?
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Male 1,744
this would be good if the people who sent the email had intelligence greater than that of a jar of mayonnaise
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Male 639
The funny thing is that none of these Americanisms annoy me when Americans say them... it`s only when British people do.

Have you ever heard someone say `Stop it already` in a British accent? It just sounds wrong.
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Male 12,138
[quote]I figured an English person, since you guys like to complain about -our- English so much, would have noticed.[/quote]
Yeah, he`s not English.
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Male 675
Almightybob, "I`m" is a contraction of "I" and "am". So literally "I am well" and "I`m well" mean the exact same thing. Besides, you`re still using it in the exact same context that her teacher was complaining about, so you`ve proven nothing.

I figured an English person, since you guys like to complain about -our- English so much, would have noticed.

What`s the big deal anyway England? You mad, bro?

Cheers to you krisbrown
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Male 32
The people who were surveyed should go get drated.
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Male 2,143
Leave it to a limey to complain.
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Male 1,216
Ok, I`m not American and I hate America, but that is a load o bullcrap and bitching.

"Train Station", how else am I supposed to say it anyway? A station of trains?
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Male 12,138
Wow, lots of bitching there on that article. Seriously, if you are close to a terminal heart attack because someone says a word a certain way that you disagree with, then you`re a dick. Get over yourself, BBC commenters.

Meant with love, A Fellow Brit.
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Female 612
How did they decide that Americans were to blame for most of these? The only clear "Americanisms" are things like the pronunciation of Z and use of math over maths, not phrases. Language isn`t stagnant, as we so often point out when they say we speak it incorrectly, but change can even happen in Britain. How they must hate that fact.

And really, if they express such anger at mere words, I really think they need to straighten out their priorities. It irritates me when people make mistakes due to an ignorant lifestyle but I hardly allow it to affect my mood. And a cultural difference in speech? That doesn`t register at all.
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Male 2,005
apparently my english is a mix between american and brittish english
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Female 146
I feel like this is being completely unfair to Americans.....we don`t even say most of the things listed here.....and as for the math vs. maths thing, I don`t believe that there`s a right way to say it, it`s all about how you are brought up......besides I feel like most of these things are comparable to Americans saying "hey look I`m British, pip pip, cheerio, crumpets and tea!"......which obviously isn`t something you hear every day in Britain
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Male 5,314
what a wanker that guy is
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Female 1,743
[quote]Not really, no. It`s annoying when another country changes your language and imposes their version over yours, but the examples you give are minor. [/quote]

We`re a country of immigrants. You can`t expect them not to integrate their culture into the language. You`re smart enough to accept this concept, I hope? Or if you were an American, would you be one of those ignorant folks who are like, "DIS IS AMURICA! I SHOULDN`T HAF TA PRESS 1 FER ENGLISH!" ?

Secondly, Americans wouldn`t `impose` our language so much if you wouldn`t gobble up our pop culture and play like you so desperately hate the United States. You`re too easy for Hollywood to make money off of. :P
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Male 25,416
wow... that was 2 long for my attention span
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Male 3,314
Folks, it`s not "zed," it`s "zee," and I have proof!

T-U-V
W-X-Y and Zed?

Doesn`t rhyme. The alphabet song clearly indicates that it`s zee!
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Male 4,290
[quote]It is better to say "I`m good" since good is a state of being whereas well is not.[/quote]
It is when you use it in the sense of "I am well". In that case it means "in good health".
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Female 1,205
My English professor, who frequently travels to the UK and went to postgraduate school there, corrected my class because we often said "I`m well" or "I`m doing well". Well is an adverb, and the response to that is "you are doing WHAT well?" So the person from Wales who was annoyed by people saying "I`m good" instead of "I`m well" was not supporting the grammatically correct phrase. It is better to say "I`m good" since good is a state of being whereas well is not. That just caught my attention because of the lesson we all got from my professor this year.
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Male 12,365
[quote]I thought stopping at 901 characters wouldn`t cut me off.[/quote]

It`s one of the many ways in which IAB`s comments software is defective. Characters are counted differently in editing and in posting. If you include and quotes or links, the counts won`t match.
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Male 12,365
[quote]Woah. Seriously? 24/7, shopping cart, and train station? This is what pisses the Brits off?[/quote]

Not really, no. It`s annoying when another country changes your language and imposes their version over yours, but the examples you give are minor. Besides, give it another 100 years and it`ll be something else. A Chinese version of English, maybe.

[quote]Man, I wanna move to the UK if that`s the most of their worries.[/quote]

No, that would be the weather :)

[quote]I don`t even get the "train station" one. What do they call it?[/quote]

Railway station, usually, but it`s not a big deal. "train station" has been in common usage here for at least as long as I`ve been alive.
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Male 12,365
[quote]Meh languages evolve, get over it.[/quote]

True, but if there is a correct version of a language, it has to be that spoken in the originating country. So if there is such a thing as a correct version of English, it`s an English version. It doesn`t make sense otherwise.

[quote]This used to be English (Beowulf, text wont display properly so go Here if you want to see it):[/quote]

Hmm...OE displays correctly in my browser. I wonder if IAB will screw it up when I post. Here`s the opening of Beowulf:

HWÆT, WE GAR-DEna in geardagum,
þeodcyninga þrym gefrunon,
hu ða æþelingas ellen fremedon!
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Male 12,365
[quote]if Z is not "zee", then how do you say it?[/quote]

`zed`

[quote]cause everyone I know says it that way.[/quote]

That`s because you`re in the USA. It`s `zed` in the rest of the English-speaking world.

I`ve no idea why the USA is different, but I`m curious now so I`ll look it up.

Straight Dope is reliable, so I`ll go with their explanation. The origin is, obviously, the Greek letter `zeta`. Old French had it as `zede`, which slopped into English via the Normans and mixed with the various existing English to come out mainly as `zed`. There were regional variations in England, which contained some dialects quite different to mainstream English. One of those regional variations was `zee`, which became the most common pronunciation in the USA, possibly simply to sound different to English.
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Female 934
The comments are more entertaining than the actual article/list.
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Male 84
WHO CARES WHAT THOSE ENGLISH THINK. SHOPPING TROLLEY. WE DOES NOT SAY THAT. WHY DOES WE HAVE TO DOES WHAT THEY DOES. THATS ONE REASON WE DUMPED TEA!! SURE YALL MAY NOT LIKE HOW WE SPEAK BUT DOES THAT MEAN THAT YOU DOES NOT KNOW WHAT WE SAYING. ONE WORD. MERICA!!!! YEAH
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Male 1,931
Language is always changing. Using shortened terms or common phrases are how language has formed. Without human beings being able to modify their way of speaking we all would be reduced to grunts. drat you, British fag. Or should I call you a poof?
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Male 2,332
Most of the words on that list are just a consequence of the natural (d)evolution of language. Love it or hate it, things change.

Some of them were simply incorrectly spelled words though.

On the whole, I know people hate Americans these days, but from a linguistic standpoint you have to admit they have a knack for putting things in simple, concise and to-the-point words. :p

After all, why should things be complicated when they can be simple? :p
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Male 1,557
LET ME JUST SETTLE SOMETHING:

No, not all Brits are whining about this, nor do the people in the article represent all of us!

The article is people saying about the use of Americanisms within BRITISH ENGLISH, ie within our own country, it`s not a case of crying over losing The Revolutionary War or being upset that `language is evolving` ffs.

As for my view? Some of them are good points, but some are just plain whiny. I`ve no problem with a railway station being called a train station for example.
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Female 1,330
This actually makes me sad. I`ve always thought UK English was so cool, and I love all the words they use that are different than ours. I had no idea they think we just jacked up their language!

Oh, and "Zed" instead of "Zee" floored me. I have never heard that in my life.
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Male 161
these are so stupid. you lamewads need to get a new hobby. if you`re so much better than us, why do you feel the need to go on and on about it? STFU, jeezuz!
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Male 258
@batmanners

It can mean become, "He has gotten bigger"
It can mean movement(?), "Joe has gotten out of the car"
It can also mean obtain, "He has gotten his diploma"

But we`d use `He has BECOME bigger`, `Joe has GOT out of the car` and `He has OBTAINED his diploma` or possibly `He has RECEIVED his diploma`.

And the best part of all this? Impressionable American women who think we`re from Hogwarts and have dirty great big magic wands. Tally Ho! Ladies, prepare yourselves to be boarded roughly as soon as I have alighted from this steam locomotive.
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Male 4,004
Completely drained of the passion he has on stage.

I thought stopping at 901 characters wouldn`t cut me off.
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Male 4,004
I found myself using many British words to say things now.

Watching Top Gear and Doctor Who is brainwashing me (and after the US TV I was raised with, my brain needs a good washing). I say "boot" instead of "trunk" and I struggle to remember to say "hood" rather than "bonnet". I do go to the "petrol" station to refill my "Nissin" (the way they say it).

If you like this stuff, you should really get into George Carlin. he had a LOVE for the English language, and knew the power of words. Many of his acts/bits are about euphemisms, useless words and many other funny things about the language.

George Carlin on Euphemisms

ALWAYS listen to George live, never get his recordings (like the ones you often find on YouTube) those are completely d
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Female 1,743
Again, see my previous post.
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Male 14,330
@Buiadh & Buiadh

DAWWWW!! Are your butts sore? You may wanna put some ice on that.
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Male 256
@McGovern1981 lol. Indeed! The best thing about that mistake is that the `b` and `w` are no where near each other, :P I`m only pulling people`s legs, not trying to troll. Peace.
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Male 505
"The Country that Kicked Your Ass TWICE " and there was me thinking that most of the people that won that war came from England?
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Male 6,737
@jamie76

Actually, you Yanks haven`t won a war againt the Brits single handedly, you`ve needed help each time, oh and France won you your independence, not Americans. ;)
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Male 4,004
And I agree with below, these sound like whining rather than amusing, not a fun read.
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Male 4,004
"15. What kind of word is "gotten"? It makes me shudder. Julie Marrs, Warrington"

It`s a legit word.

It can mean become, "He has gotten bigger"
It can mean movement(?), "Joe has gotten out of the car"
It can also mean obtain, "He has gotten his diploma"

The improper way to use it, is as past tense for getting.

"He`s gotten his plane tickets", "I`ve gotten sick of airline food."

Yes I realize it may sound American when you hear it, but that`s the reason AmE and BrE are two completely different dialects.
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Male 505
Yep, they sound like whiny bastards, look on the bright side some of us have to live with them. Some don`t even seem to know the correct english word - for instance leverage (US) is actually gearing in the UK. The aussies have it right when they call us whiny pomms.
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Male 14,330
@jsatan

If you`re gonna be a Nazi do it right at least I take it you ment "we" not "be."
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Male 6,737
@darkmagic14n

You think Brits say "Shool" for School? Really? Where the hell did you hear that?
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Male 256
@koffymasheen. The English being `Nazis` (there be go with the upper cases again) of the English language, o` my word.. What ever next. :)
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Male 2,553
American/British English has got to be one of my favourite subjects concerning grammar at all, but a lot of these were, in my opinion, whiny and sometimes completely unfounded. Yes, sir, I have an ISSUE with that.
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Male 317
[quote]jamie76
Male, 30-39, Western US
666 Posts Friday, July 22, 2011 11:45:24 AM
Dear UK,

F you.

Sincerely,

The Country that Kicked Your Ass TWICE and Has Now Made You It`s Lap Dog[/quote]

I cried a bit |-(
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Male 256
@msieg007. You do know where to use upper and loser case letters, right? :P I`m just "yanking your chain". If you`re going to give users `beef` with regards to their use of the English language, please at least try not to make mistakes.
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Male 820
..., is it just me or do all of those guys sound like whiny bastards?

(Except for the "I could care less," That one does bother me too)
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Male 405
Who in America has ever used the word "fortnightly"?
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Female 188
@nubblins

I was just about to post that.

I just couldn`t stop rolling my eyes when looking over it. I saw this as a list of nearly 50 very snooty people. (I say nearly fifty because some of them were less annoyed and more amused by it. Also, it`s "zed" damn it.)
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Male 2
British rarely complain about American`s using these terms. They complain about British people using them. It`s clearly put on and a bit sad.
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Male 1,625
how about schedule for the brits?

say school
now say sche
notice how they have the same sk sound, not a sh sound?
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Female 97
This list just kind of makes Brits look like the grammar nazis of the world.
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Male 2,370
"I stopped reading after "maths" If you insist on people saying it with an `s` you might as well just tell everyone you`re a pretentious twat."

I`m with msieg007 here.

I`ve always wondered about the whole Maths thing.

And "shopping cart" causes an issue? When I look up trolly it says.... "chiefly British : a cart or wheeled stand used for conveying something (as food or books)"

So what`s wrong with calling it a shopping cart you pretentious twat?
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Female 9
Oh dear, these are all in "English" English. Allow me to translate:

"WAAAAH! WAAAAH! Language is evolving! I`m not considerate of the other speaker`s intentions and don`t care that the purpose of language is communication! The necessary fluidity of language gives me the butthurt and I want to let the offenders know about it! It hasn`t occurred to me that this might be petty and rude! WAAAAAAAH!"

(That this comment is itself petty and rude has not been lost on me).
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Female 1,743
Need I re-submit Stephen Fry`s Language rant?

There. Watch this.

Enough said, move along.


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Male 383
@8bithero & @starfl4ke: It`s called a railway station, but train station is perfectly acceptable and is not an Americanism. There are a number of these that irk me, but those are more `business speak` than Americanisms. I strongly prefer English, but that doesn`t mean i disapprove of people speaking American English, it`s the whole new corporate terminology and choice of words that makes my blood boil.
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Male 14,330
And not a poo was given.

@starf4ke

Wow nice pair of ummmm uhhh...glasses.
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Female 349
*we all call
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Female 349
coffeekoneko - As far as I was aware, call all call it a train station. Ffs. Half of these are BS. For example, "issue" is a SYNONYM for "problem".
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Male 5,413
Train station is normal though. I like the comments on here though. Bunch of stupid angry American using words like "pretentious". Still, when Americans say "touching fannies" DAMN THAT`S FUNNY! XD *Giggles*
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Male 3,894
Most of these are made up or otherwise unused-- "ridiculosity"? I`ve never heard that in my life.
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Male 208
Wow let`s listen to a bunch of whiny, most likely old English professors complain. I have never heard a very large chunk of those before anyway. I will say that number 50 has always bugged me though.
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Male 57
Wow people like the ones in this article bug the drat out of me.
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Male 2,034
I stopped reading after "maths" If you insist on people saying it with an `s` you might as well just tell everyone you`re a pretentious twat.
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Female 4,039
Wow, these people need to chillax (noticed that wasn`t on teh list XD)

I have two that I hate equally: "Conversate" and "out the car."

As in "I got out the car and we conversated."
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Male 633
here`s a word: pretentious
as in, "believing that using the term `season` or `shopping cart` somehow lowers your IQ is pretty effing pretentious..."
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Female 1,008
Woah. Seriously? 24/7, shopping cart, and train station? This is what pisses the Brits off? Man, I wanna move to the UK if that`s the most of their worries.
I don`t even get the "train station" one. What do they call it?
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Male 1,920
This is better. Why don`t the brits bitch that no one talks like this anymore?

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Male 2,344
And another one I particularly liked.

"32. Going forward? If I do I shall collide with my keyboard. Ric Allen, Matlock "

So do people outside the states not have figurative language or something?
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Male 541
I see a list of 50 people who need to relax and learn not to get worked up over something so trivial.

It`s called the evolution of language. If language didn`t evolve we`d still be speaking with thee`s, thy`s and thou`s.
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Male 74
I`m very aggravated after reading all of that.

Number 50 is worth mentioning though.
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Male 2,344
Sooo, this is basically just people being dogmatic about their OWN dialects versus Americas. Like the shopping cart bit?

OMG I SAID CART INSTEAD OF TROLLEY, I AM DISGUSTED.

This makes me lol at the rest of the world.
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Male 702
@rynEnigma

I could get on board with that.
*Looks out the window at all of the pretty little Jed-Birds*
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Male 1,920
Meh languages evolve, get over it.

This used to be English (Beowulf, text wont display properly so go Here if you want to see it):
þone god sende folce tó frófre fyrenðearfe ongeat þæt híe aér drugon aldorléase lange hwíle

(God sent him to comfort the people. He had seen the dire distress that they suffered before, leader-less a long while)
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Male 302
@not_me I`m guessing you meant "stupid" instead of "stuped" and "anyway" instead of "any ways"... unless those were supposed to be tongue in cheek.

But yeah... I think "winningest" is more an internet thing, thanks to Mr. Sheen.
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Male 798
[quote]11. Transportation. What`s wrong with transport? Greg Porter, Hercules, CA, US [/quote]

Americans separate the two as a noun and verb. Transportation is a noun, transport is a verb.

Example:

"I am going to use transportation to get somewhere."

"I am going to find someone to transport me somewhere."
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Male 2,345
Dear UK,

F you.

Sincerely,

The Country that Kicked Your Ass TWICE and Has Now Made You It`s Lap Dog.
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Male 47
Oops, meant `our` instead of `are`.
Also, Zed just sounds dumb.
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Male 302
Eh, it`s a mixed bag. I agree with some, some just seem normal to me, some irritate me, and some I`ve never heard of.
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Male 47
They are just angry cause are culture is more popular than theirs and our version of English is the one deceminating around the world and not thiers. It`s all stuped any ways since English is a common langauage with very few rules on how it`s spoken.
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Female 7,838
Most of those irritate me, even more if I catch myself actally using them, Perfectly alright if they are used by an american of course.
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Male 238
dang brits, if you dont like it you shouldn`t have lost the war.
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Male 193
I like #46. Where the person deems it necessary to type "zee" instead of just "Z". I have never figured out why Brits say "Zed". I`m going to start an American tradition where instead of J we say Jed.
^roll eyes^
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Male 22
brits are pissy.
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Female 18
Reminds me of being a kid and reading "Fortnight" in a book... I had to go look it up because I had never heard it used and had no idea what it meant.
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Male 42
if Z is not "zee", then how do you say it?
cause everyone I know says it that way.
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Male 19,868
Link: Americanisms: BBC`s 50 Most noted Examples [Rate Link] - You think the UK`s all weird with their talk of boots, biscuits, crisps, chips, fannies, loos, and how`s your fathers?
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