Homemade Solar Ray Of Death

Submitted by: manorrd 6 years ago Weird

One neighbor you might not want to piss off... Only awesomely bad things will come from this device.
There are 83 comments:
Male 1,164
"His hand being willing to glance into the "light" shows how wimpy this design really is."

Angilion - "Your statement shows how wimpy your understanding is..."

That and the fact that he BURNED ROCK. With a MIRROR. Let`s see you do that.
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Male 209
Damn DirecTV is gonna be pissed...
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Male 440
@Vimto "Ok, now quckly change the range of it as the target moves away."

Run after them! :^)
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Male 2,859
Ok, now quckly change the range of it as the target moves away.
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Female 44
want
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Male 12,365
[quote]His hand being willing to glance into the "light" shows how wimpy this design really is.[/quote]

Your statement shows how wimpy your understanding is.

The point of concentrated solar power is to gather solar power from an area and *focus it on a much smaller area*.

The key word is FOCUS.

At the focal point, there`s a lot of energy. The further away you are from the focal point, the less energy there is and it drops off very quickly.

Close to the mirror array, the amount of solar energy hitting his hand would be little more than the amount of solar energy hitting his hand normally.
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Female 546
yeah i doubt that thing was destroyed. he just doesn`t want to be hauled off to jail for creating a WMD.
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Male 151
fake
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Male 294
His hand being willing to glance into the "light" shows how wimpy this design really is. Quotes such as "bright as 5,000 suns" are only relevent with supporting data. Don`t waste your time. Nothing to see here. Buy a magnifying glass, and move on.
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Male 741
Well yeah, what I said was much better explained by other I-A-Bers BUT I still think it should have been used for something more practical than pseudo military purposes, hence I want it for a S`more-a-palooza.
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Male 741
If I`m correct on my optics, mirrors and physics knowledge that there where he can burn wood and suddenly not is the spot where the most light concentrated is; if you step forward or backward a bit it will no longer hold the same intensity or effect. He did make it work but he should have calibrated for it to work from farther away than just a feet or two away from the dish because as is it`s really just not practical and can only be used for roasting things up close and personal. Marshmallows anyone?
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Male 440
I can`t believe the guy who thought it was a laser. Everyone knows LASER stands for Self Contained Underwater Breathing Apparatus! You sir, owe the rest of us another Internet.
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Male 12,365
[quote]take that mythbusters[/quote]

Are you trolling or just ignorant and determined not to read anything?
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Female 53
take that mythbusters
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Male 12,365
The "tower of power" CSP approach also leads to unusually pretty power stations:



That`s the first stage/test facility at Seville, in Spain. It`s not just a test facility - it feeds 20MW into the grid, which is enough for much of the needs of the town nearby.

That`s an unedited photo - the rays of light are genuinely there. They`re caused by the focused solar energy interacting with dust in the air on its way from the mirrors to the heating tank near the top of the tower.

It`s about efficiency. Parabolic troughs are easy and cheap, but you only get ~15%. Stirling engines are more expensive, but will get you 40% and therfore need less area. Solar towers potentially require less area still and potentially have lower generating costs, but they`re in development and have high build costs.

All the methods are currently in commercial use up to 100MW, to see
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Male 12,365
There`s another side-effect of CSP that would be useful in some circumstances - agriculture.

With some designs, it`s possible to grow plants in shaded areas behind/under the mirrors.

So if you have a hot desert area near a sea (and a fair few places do), you could use a CSP power plant to generate electricity, purify and desalinate seawater to make drinking water and irrigation water for crops growing behind/under the mirrors.

Power, food and water all in one go.

It`s not a panacea, but it`s a useful option in some areas. For example, there`s a plan to supply 20% of the electricity needs of Europe, Britain and Ireland from CSP in northern Africa. A detailed plan, using only currently existing technology.

The scale is similar in the USA, using the southern states. It would work well there, too.
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Male 12,365
Why are there a dozen people talking crap about this proving Mythbusters wrong *after* it`s already been explained why it doesn`t?

It isn`t even a similar experiment, unless you believe that the mirrors on this dish are being held in place by teeny-tiny little people.
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Male 12,365
[quote]I was not aware that that CSP arrays were already in use to generate electricity. Due to the quantity of energy generated, however, it looks to me that CSP arrays make far more efficient use of solar energy than do solar panels (i.e. a CSP array-driven steam turbine would generate more electricity than a solar panel). I am no scientist however, nor to I have the inclination to research this on the Interweb, so feel free to dispute this with data.[/quote]

On paper it would be possible to just about edge out CSP with the most efficient PV panels in existence.

But you can`t, because it isn`t possible to make enough of them and the cost would be insane.

A big advantage of CSP is that it doesn`t require rare materials or delicate, complex manufacturing. It`s viable on a large scale, whereas PV isn`t.

You can use both, though - PV uses light and CSP uses heat, so they don`t necessarily clash.
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Male 12,365
[quote]Also, is there a benefit to constructing a gigantic CSP array or many smaller arrays? If an array small enough to be handheld can create enough heat to burn through metal, then surely it would also be enough to drive a steam turbine on a smaller scale.[/quote]

Too small a scale. It doesn`t focus very much thermal energy. There`s a lot of heat at a very small point - that`s not much use for making steam. It would be more complicated and require much more area to generate the same amount of electricity with thousands of tiny CSP power stations than with one big one. All those scaled-down water tanks and pipework and turbines at ground level would put areas in the shade, so the mirrors would have to be spread out more.

The ideal use of area is to have the material heated by the CSP and the water by that material at the top of a tower large enough for a multiple rows of mirrors packed quite closely together to all focus on it, over the mirror in front.
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Male 12,365
[quote]@Angilion Could they use a giant Swiffer Duster of some kind instead of water to clean them?[/quote]

That`s the basic idea behind the waterless cleaning systems I referred to (except for the NASA one, which is ingenious, very efficient and very expensive).

There are problems with using just brushes and dusters - the brushes and dusters don`t clean as well as water and they get dusty themselves. There`s a *lot* of surface area in the mirrors of a commercial scale CSP power plant. If you`re dusting 1000m^2 of mirror with a hot, dry duster in a hot, dry desert, you`re going to get a lot of dust on the duster pretty quickly.

It`s not an impossible problem, but there`s plenty of scope for improvement.
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Male 230
Lame, I can melt rocks with my $35 fresnel lens!
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Male 59
Someone send this video to the mythbusters. This man did what the couldn`t.
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Male 2,855
theres an actual version done by an university, its possible to do it, but requires precise alignment of the mirrors, by looking at the close-up of the mirrors they look glued up by a 4 year old, so i call fake on this version
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Male 3
I wonder what happens when he puts his hand there :D
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Male 1,021
Military gonna develop this I bet. A bigger version or something
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Male 496
Also, is there a benefit to constructing a gigantic CSP array or many smaller arrays? If an array small enough to be handheld can create enough heat to burn through metal, then surely it would also be enough to drive a steam turbine on a smaller scale.
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Male 496
@Angilion: of course the problems here are the same problems we have with solar panels, especially when considering the amount of land mass required to generate the vast quantities of electricity we would need to supplant carbon based fuels. At most (or until we figure out a way to put a large number of solar arrays into space and transmit the power back to earth), this kind of technology can only be ancillary to other, more reliable, sources of power.

I was not aware that that CSP arrays were already in use to generate electricity. Due to the quantity of energy generated, however, it looks to me that CSP arrays make far more efficient use of solar energy than do solar panels (i.e. a CSP array-driven steam turbine would generate more electricity than a solar panel). I am no scientist however, nor to I have the inclination to research this on the Interweb, so feel free to dispute this with data.
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Female 2,525
"So Mythbusters failed to do it (multiple times) with the help of a lot of money, two extremely ingenious minds, an entire college, multiple engineering and science geeks, and PRESIDENT OBAMA. But this teenager did it with a bunch of mirrors, a little wagon, and a shed of doom. "

Anyone can do it this way. The Mythbusters were trying to do it with people, and that`s why it failed.
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Male 6,694
What ever. GasMaskKid is right.
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Male 716
The ironic death of the death ray
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Male 694
So Mythbusters failed to do it (multiple times) with the help of a lot of money, two extremely ingenious minds, an entire college, multiple engineering and science geeks, and PRESIDENT OBAMA. But this teenager did it with a bunch of mirrors, a little wagon, and a shed of doom.
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Male 16
omg it can burn me when i stay still for 10 sec at a 1 meter distance, what a killing weapon
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Female 255
Now put your hand there.
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Male 2,344
THE SHED OF DOOOOM
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Male 2,988
looks like a good way to accidentally burn yourself
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Male 448
@handeman77

Why don`t you stand in front of it?
We can find out what focused sunlight does to troll flesh. Do you turn to stone like in David the Gnome?
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Male 20
@SilverThread

This isn`t even close to the concept of a laser. Please know what you`re talking about before giving snarky remarks.
But I guess this is the stuff that makes comment boards go `round, isn`t it?

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Male 185
They`ve been using this same concept for a solar generator in AZ for decades now.
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Male 240
I have a material so dense this would not get through.... let us us put a Democrat in front of this, then you will see what cannot be beaten.
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Female 296
dude take that to a ant mound omg 1000000 would die instantly.
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Male 160
@SilverThread
its not a laser since there is no stimulated emission.
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Female 734
@Angilion Could they use a giant Swiffer Duster of some kind instead of water to clean them?
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Male 1,744
wonder how much gas he used on that piece of wood to get it to light.

Oh, and a death ray that reaches all of 16in (~40cm to you Euro`s), color me unimpressed.
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Male 3,431
Congratulations! You have invented a Laser.
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Male 88
He was a quiet child, always kept to himself, never hurt anybody...
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Female 70
Hehehe. Fire. Fire..Hehee heheee
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Male 12,365
[quote]>>another thing, just a little bit of dust (which is rather common in the desert, eh?) drops the efficiency of a solar array a LOT! Cleaning all those arrays would take TONS of water every week, which is not a good idea (cost wise) in the desert.[/quote]

Yes, dust has been found to be a problem. There are automated systems that combine water and brushes and those use *much* less water. Work is being done on waterless cleaning systems and on bringing down the cost of systems developed by NASA for surface probes in very dusty environments. They work, but the cost of fitting a large scale CSP mirror array with them is impractical.

Thinking of water, though, CSP does have a massive bonus for deserts near enough to the coast - it can used to desalinate and purify huge amounts of seawater as a side-effect of how it works, without greatly reducing efficiency of electricity production.
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Male 378
maybe this is what the lighthouse of Alexandria was based on
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Male 15,510
It reminds me of this craziness
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Male 36,509
@shizzamX, some fireflys got into the shed, of course!

@Angilion, your calculations are similar to something I read, of how many tousands of square miles of solar arrays it would take.

>>another thing, just a little bit of dust (which is rather common in the desert, eh?) drops the efficiency of a solar array a LOT! Cleaning all those arrays would take TONS of water every week, which is not a good idea (cost wise) in the desert.
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Female 2,695
"completely destroyed in a burning shed" wonder if it caused the fire?
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Male 12,365
[quote]Why can`t this be applied to power generation?[/quote]

i) It only works effectively in very sunny areas.
ii) It only produces significant amounts of power with a large area for mirrors.
iii) It`s not as dependable for power generation because you can`t control how much sunshine there is and how clear the skies are.
iv) It doesn`t work at all well at night. You can extend its working time some hours after sunset with clever design, but obviously there`s no sun at night.

It is being used and the scale is ramping up as scientists and engineers learn from test facilities, but it`s not a panacea for electricity generation.

I notice you`re from the USA, so:

I did some rough calculations on a bit of paper a while ago and came up with an estimation that the USA could, on paper, supply its daytime electricity requirements on clear days from covering about half of the Mojave desert with CSP arrays. Of course, it wouldn`t be that easy in
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Male 487
"With a focal length of about 3 feet, it`s totally impractical. I believe the Mythbusters were trying to do it from about a half mile out."

Focal length is a product of antenna diameter... If you didn`t notice this is just an elliptical DTH satellite antenna with mirrors on it. You could design your own, much bigger and with a much farther focal length. Not that the whole death ray thing is practical, because it isn`t. But it`s not impossible if your target stays at the same distance away long enough.
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Male 12,365
koolaidepot: That`s the place I was thinking of. The CSP you see in that video is one of the very small ones. The big one outside is far, far more powerful.


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Male 12,365
There is a practical purpose for CSP - generating electricity.

The basic idea is the same as a conventional gas/coal/etc power station - you boil water to make steam to drive a turbine that drives a dynamo that creates electricity. The difference is that instead of burning gas/coal/etc to generate the heat, you use a far larger and more precise version of this sort of thing. The CSP heats a large tank of liquid to very high temperature and that heats water to 100C. It works quite well if you have a lot of space for the mirrors and the towers you need to put the tanks in (to raise them up so that all the mirrors can focus on the same area) and a lot of sunshine.

It`s not for everywhere, but if you have some hot desert going spare it`s useful.
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Male 914
It`s so bright that all daylight fades away when the camera is centered on the beam. Scary.
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Male 1
In the same thread and still awesome. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=z0_nuvPKIi8
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Male 12,365
[quote]His hand being willing to glance into the "light" shows how wimpy this design really is.[/quote]

It shows the relevance of focus. With concentrated solar power, you get lots of heat (and light) *at the focus*. Move forwards or backwards a bit and it drops hugely. The key point is how large an area the solar energy is spread over. Move away from the point the array is focused on and the area increases rapidly, so the heat decreases rapidly.
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Male 300
With a focal length of about 3 feet, it`s totally impractical. I believe the Mythbusters were trying to do it from about a half mile out.
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Male 12,365
[quote]Send this to myth busters . They couldn`t get their death ray to work . You did something they couldn`t.[/quote]

Mythbusters were trying to replicate a *specific* myth, in which Archimedes used Greek warriors with polished shields. They tried different materials, but the basis was the same - they were trying to use mirrors held by people. Focus was always the problem there. If you set the same mirrors on a precise alignment to focus on a square inch or two, it would ignite wood *at that precise spot*.

Concentrated solar power is all about focus. You could stand in front of this thing and be fine if you were a yard away from the focus and not looking at the mirror array.
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Male 294
His hand being willing to glance into the "light" shows how wimpy this design really is. Quotes such as "bright as 5,000 suns" are only relevent with supporting data. Don`t waste your time. Nothing to see here. Buy a magnifying glass, and move on.
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Male 12,365
5000 suns my arse. Every second, Sol emits about 4,000,000,000,000 times as much energy as a nuclear bomb (in a sense, Sol is a nuclear bomb nearly a million miles wide). Sol is a midrange kind of star. There are suns millions of times more powerful. I suspect his array is more than 5000 times larger than the focus and that`s where he`s getting the figure from.

There`s one in France where the main mirror array is the size of a large building. It`ll put a hole the size of your head through anything. It`s in the Pyrenees somewhere, because they could put it out of the way and the skies are clear nearly every day.
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Male 586
destroyed in a burning shed. LOL
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Male 215
@kilroy5555

It already is, all the time.
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Male 13
Send this to myth busters . They couldn`t get their death ray to work . You did something they couldn`t .
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Male 1,548
"unfortunately it was destroyed in a burning shed"

I wonder how that happened...
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Male 1,054
"This kid is a moron."

The fact that you and others have misunderstood what he said doesn`t make him the moron.

The quote is `brightness over 5,000 suns` - which is different from what you and others are imagining he said - the total energy output of 5,000 suns.

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Male 257
@lillim there is a difference between the brightness scale of the sun and 5000 suns worth of eneryg/heat
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Male 496
Why can`t this be applied to power generation?
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Male 25,416
Sounded like somebody needed wd40
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Male 491
That young man has no friends.
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Male 633
send it to mythbusters
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Male 2,422
I`m not sure that he knows what obliterate means.
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Female 269
Only slightly more powerful than a magnifying glass, it seems. If it were the power of one sun, much less multiple, the metal lid would burst into flame or melt instantly. Impressive use of time, and exaggeration.
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Male 2,552
lol @ "OVER 5,000 SUNS"

A single sun would disintegrate all the stuff he was burning in less than a second. This kid is a moron.
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Male 788
A burning shed? Ha
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Male 4,793
"Unfortuneately, the R5800 was completely destroyed in a burning shed..."

Apparantly somebody forgot to cover it up with a thick blanket and store it away from the sun -.-`
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Male 11,740
Awww....I thought he would end with the neighbor who pissed him off. Put that thing to someone`s head and watch them scream..... muhahahhahahaaaa
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Male 1,195
Destroyed in a burning shed... lol.
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Male 10
Admit it, you want it.
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Male 37,889
Chad has been productive in his mom`s basement.

or is the word "destructive" ... ?
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Female 142
shed of DOOM
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Male 2,372
Link: Homemade Solar Ray Of Death [Rate Link] - One neighbor you might not want to piss off... Only awesomely bad things will come from this device.
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