Discovery Channel Covers Nuclear Fusion Test

Submitted by: canusuck 6 years ago Science

The future of limitless clean energy isn"t here yet.
There are 61 comments:
Male 3,076
@turbotong CRT monitors are use because they don`t need to wast money on monitors that can display the same image ass a CRT display when they already had CRT monitors in the storage and you are welcome to buy a fusion generator and see if you still have money in your budget for a 30" lcd screen...
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Male 600
dude... how old is this video? ppl are using CRT monitors
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Male 650
@henryhendrix which is why it`s still in the experimental stage, duh
But once it heats up, it just heats itself as long as the machine is not stopped, so its all good
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Male 703
@henryhendrix: What powers all the many things needed to get electricity from a coal plant/solar farm/wind farm to your house? All rely on the basis that the energy used to produce the energy is less than the energy produced. I`m fairly certain that would have been something the scientists considered before starting their tests.
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Female 412
Dutch subtitles FTW! ^^
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Male 722
What powers the big hydrogen fusing machine? Goddamn irony.
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Male 2,402
No such thing as infinite energy. Even the sun dies in a set amount of time. Second the hydrogen on earth is finite in supply also.
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Male 533
To have infinite energy, you need a sun-like system (i.e. an artificial star) which would have to be about the size of Jupiter.
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Male 1,598
Pretty cool seeing the advances in mass energy production.
If I were there I would have yelled,"Fuuuuusssssiiiiioooon. HA!!!!!!!!!" lol
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Male 44
I can`t say rooster now? fml
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Male 44
A ponytail will get you tail, just keep it out of my Mai Tai. Your pony tail will never fail to send you and your chiquita skyhigh. Ponytails roostertails, ponytails roostertails, two things that will always rock! But a word to all you males, don`t ever lose those tails, cuz then you`d just have ponycock!
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Male 250
fusion is not unlimited. for all practical concerns it is functionally unlimited for the time being, but it still consumes materials and fuel in order to operate.
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Male 224
happy about what? You didn`t do anything.
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Male 5,194
See the nuclear physicist with the ponytail? Notice all the SMART guys you see with ponytails? Ponytails are cool. Ponytails are sexy. A ponytail immediately adds +20 IQ points to any guy.
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Female 7,833
Why did they use a narrator who cannot pronounce the word `nuclear` ?
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Male 2,402
They tout all the beneifits. It`s strange how no one really exponds what the negatives would be.
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Male 14,330
PFFFttt you people are living in a fantisy the future is Z power the real green energy all we need is treadmills that generate electricity and zombies!!

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Male 561
yeah, not nucular fishin
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Male 313
nucular fusion?
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Male 3,915
"the diameter of the sun is about 100 times that of the earth"

WOAH WOAH WOAH!......i thought it was like a million times bigger??

"the sun produces enough energy to power the whole planet for a million years"

okay...now they`re just getting all of their facts from wikipedia....
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Female 3,001
cool tings
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Male 4,290

[quote]Also, I heard a rumor when I visited Germany last year that some portions of europe where converting over to DC power sources since there is obvious advantages to consistency but modern electronics can solve the problems with transmission. [/quote]
I haven`t heard about that plan. I know there are several HVDC lines around in Europe, mainly connecting between countries, but I haven`t heard of any country planning a total conversion. Sounds interesting, but I`m not sure about it. HVDC has its own drawbacks.
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Male 4,290
[quote]AC electricity could be stored in flywheels but there would still be losses due to friction and counter EMF.[/quote]
Well, yes, flywheels will work in the kW range. It`s not practical on a national grid, working in GW.

[quote]When you refer to frequency variations do you mean voltage, or potential, variations?[/quote]
Um... neither. Frequency is measured in Hertz. I mean that the frequency of the National Grid, which is nominally 50Hz, varies around 50 depending on how well the demand and supply are matched.
The UK National Grid official frequency tolerance is 50 +- 0.5Hz, but they usually try to keep it to +-0.2Hz.
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Male 2,440
Couldn`t we just solve all of the world`s energy needs by burning douchebags like the ones on Jersey Shore? Sure, it`s not the cleanest energy source, and it would create a smell like hair gel and old leather, but at least we`d never be in short supply, right?
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Male 102
@Angilion

The size of the flywheel necessary would only need to be about the same size as the generator already in use, so double the size of the current facilities. The amount of energy stored is a function of mass and velocity of the flywheel. Your proposal would consume larger areas of land with the lakes idea.
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Male 12,365
[quote]a v8 1.6 litre?? maybe a 4.0 or a 4.6 or 6.0[/quote]

1.6L V8s do exist. Smaller ones, too. I doubt if you`d find them in a car, though. There are more efficient designs for car engines with that kind of displacement. You get some V8 motorbike engines though and they`re they`re the smaller ones.

The relatively large engine sizes in the USA are as much cultural as technical.
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Male 86
meepmaker: like lolboy said, the magnet fields help keep the hydrogen from touching anything, and i assume its all contained within a near vacuum so that there is no heat transfer or resistance when the hydrogen is circulating. Keeping everything safe and efficient

Here : This website has info about research being done in the US by the NIF. They use a different method with lasers to induce fusion. Supposedly, this fall, NIF is suppose to have there first fusion reaction where they have more energy output than input.
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Male 12,365
[quote]AC electricity could be stored in flywheels but there would still be losses due to friction and counter EMF.[/quote]

Is that anywhere near being viable for storing GW of electricity? Or are we looking at flywheels the size of cities? Countries?

If you have plenty of space, you could store energy in pairs of artificial lakes. One higher, one lower. Pump water up when you have spare electricity, let it run down through a hydro power station when you need more. It`s not all that efficient, but it does allow what is effectively storage of very large amounts of power.
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Male 3,296
"I just thought of something if this actually becomes something... CARS!!! Hey, man, I got a V8 1.6 litre.. what you got? Fusion!! Well they said it was a trillion times more efficient than fossil fuels"

a v8 1.6 litre?? maybe a 4.0 or a 4.6 or 6.0
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Male 102
@almightybob1

AC electricity could be stored in flywheels but there would still be losses due to friction and counter EMF. When you refer to frequency variations do you mean voltage, or potential, variations? I do not own an oscilloscope so I cannot monitor frequency but I would think frequency has to do more with the actual speed of the generator being turned than the demand for wattage. Also, I heard a rumor when I visited Germany last year that some portions of europe where converting over to DC power sources since there is obvious advantages to consistency but modern electronics can solve the problems with transmission.
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Male 12,365
[quote]It only generates electricity when the wind is blowing.[/quote]

It`s even worse than that, as it only generates electricity when the wind is blowing within the right range of speeds. Too much wind will shut the "windmill" turbines down just as effectively as no wind at all. It`s not hurricane levels either - normal wind is quite often too much.

Wave is looking good here in the UK. Lots of coastline on an island and the waves come all the time day and night quite consistently. The biggest current problem is that wave power is too strong. It quickly breaks the power stations. If that problem is cracked, northwest Scotland alone could in theory power much of Europe. The power is there and devices to convert it efficiently exist.
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Male 2,229
Geo thermal energy is the way to go to replace fossil fuel plants, and is proven to be more reliable by a wide margin than wind, and has a greater return than solar. And is know to have a much smaller "foot print" than hydro electric power.
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Male 4,290
This is how much the power demand in the UK National Grid has varied over the past 24 hours, in MW:



If you rely on too many unpredictable power sources like wind, you can`t continually match supply to demand.

Hydro is good for that, because it`s clean, efficient and reliable. We have a (relatively) lot of hydro in Scotland.
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Male 12,365
[quote]I just thought of something if this actually becomes something... CARS!!! Hey, man, I got a V8 1.6 litre.. what you got? Fusion!! Well they said it was a trillion times more efficient than fossil fuels[/quote]

That`s way out there, unless your car is the size of a house. Imagine the traffic jams! :)

There would be a degree of amusing weirdness in going back to a steam engine for vehicles.
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Male 213
NOO-KLEE-ARR, Mr. Narrator.

not NOO-KEW-LAR.
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Male 4,290
[quote]wind is better. more relaible. eco friendly. and it`s cellular. if one goes down the effects aren`t so dramatic. [/quote]
Eco friendly, yes. Reliable, no. It only generates electricity when the wind is blowing. That`s not reliable. As Angilion says, it`s just unsuitable as a baseline power source. The national power grid is a delicate beast to manage.

National Power Grids 101:

AC electricity cannot be stored, which means that the amount generated must be constantly matched to the amount being used, minute by minute, around the clock.
The system frequency and the demand-supply disparity are inextricably linked. If supply exceeds demand, the frequency rises. If demand exceeds supply, the frequency falls. If the frequency changes too much, the grid collapses and you get blackouts.

So what you need to run a grid is electricity sources that you KNOW you can control, and that you can turn on and off at will. Wind cannot do that.
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Male 12,365
[quote]if a nuclear power plant goes down, a whole city is in the dark.[/quote]

Not if you have a comprehensive grid and spare capacity. It might be a problem in some parts of the USA, which is very large and quite sparsely populated in many areas, but it isn`t a universal problem. Power stations are taken offline quite often for various reasons and the system carries on working.

You have to vary alternative sources to suit location and it`s far harder to try to splice together a reliable system than it is with power stations using something that you have control over. You need to come up with something that allows a lot of overproduction and some form of storing massive amounts of energy long-term or exploit something that`s almost always dependable (e.g. high altitude wind, wave in some areas).
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Male 321
I just thought of something if this actually becomes something... CARS!!! Hey, man, I got a V8 1.6 litre.. what you got? Fusion!! Well they said it was a trillion times more efficient than fossil fuels
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Male 4,290
[quote]Gah, I have misused an apostrophe! Its and it`s got me again. [/quote]
Not to rub salt in the wound, but you actually did it twice. It`s OK though, the apostrophe forgives you.
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Male 12,365
Gah, I have misused an apostrophe! Its and it`s got me again.

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Male 258
nu-ku-lar!
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Male 12,365
[quote]@Aceman, you are retarded. there are BILLIONS of stars out there.[/quote]

Congratulations, you`ve just publically made a fool of yourself in the silliest way possible. You`ve stupidly insulted someone else when they`re right and you`re wrong.

There is one star in the solar system - the sun, formally known as Sol. That`s why it`s called the solar system.
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Male 4,290
[quote]The sun is a giant ball of pure energy[/quote]

No, it isn`t. It contains matter, because nuclear fusion requires matter.

[quote]nucular [...] nucular [...] nucular [...] nucular [...] nucular[/quote]
It`s NUC-LE-AR. Jesus. This is supposed to be educational.
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Male 1,455
Nucular? Really?
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Male 4,290
[quote]Aceman, you are retarded. there are BILLIONS of stars out there.[/quote]

Yes, in the universe. Yes, in the galaxy.
But the solar system is defined as the star Sol (AKA the Sun) and the 8 planets orbiting it. So, by definition, there is only one star in the solar system.
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Male 12,365
[quote]wind is better. more relaible. eco friendly. and it`s cellular. if one goes down the effects aren`t so dramatic.[/quote]

One of the biggest problem with existing wind power technology is that it is *less* reliable. You can`t use it for baseline power and you can`t easily vary it`s output to meet demand. The other really big problem with it is that it can`t produce enough electricity anyway, even if you`re willing and able to cover the country with it. A sparsely populated country might be able to get enough power sometimes by covering vast areas with wind farms, but even then you just can`t run a country on "enough power sometimes".

The only form of wind power that`s viable on paper is high altitude wind power and that has a bunch of it`s own problems.

It is not the solution you portray it as being.
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Female 158
@Aceman, you are retarded. there are BILLIONS of stars out there.
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Female 1,008
I couldn`t watch the whole thing because the narrator kept saying "nucular fusion."
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Male 1,184
Oh, I guess it`s Dutch, then. Thought it was German. They`re pretty similar, and I don`t speak either.

Also, you didn`t respond to my email, davy.
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Male 1
@Siyanor

Uh, no, this is Dutch. And I can know that. I actually saw this program a few weeks ago, lol
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Male 81
4:35 "The reactor produces energy like any star in the solar system."


I`m PRETTY SURE there`s only ONE star in the solar system.
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Male 798
Gerry: Yes, that is true, but if this works out I imagine there would be so much reserve energy that it wouldn`t really matter.

Windmills are great, but the problem is that in some areas it isn`t that windy which means no energy. The only viable option for wind energy are those high-altitude ones.
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Male 12,138
[quote]I got more distracted watching the subtitles and how at times that language looks like a mix of English / Spanish[/quote]
Yeah, that`s Dutch. The "Special Needs Kid" of languages.
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Male 798
meepmaker: My guess is that the magnetic fields help a bit.
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Male 37,888
if a nuclear power plant goes down, a whole city is in the dark.

wind is better. more relaible. eco friendly. and it`s cellular. if one goes down the effects aren`t so dramatic.

you can slap a windmill up anywhere on the planet. nuclear power plants are harder to build and harder to maintain.
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Male 25,416
So cool!
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Male 1,184
More like English is a mix of that language (which is German, btw) and Spanish, Angel.
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Female 535
Wanna stick your finger in there?
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Male 6,694
Seems like the machine would melt at those temps.
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Male 15,510
I got more distracted watching the subtitles and how at times that language looks like a mix of English / Spanish
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Male 808
Link: Discovery Channel Covers Nuclear Fusion Test [Rate Link] - The future of limitless clean energy isn`t here yet.
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