I Could Care Less English PSA

Submitted by: davymid 7 years ago in

Bah. We reckon it"s just sour grapes since the US topped England in their World Cup Group...
There are 146 comments:
Female 125
Who cares?
Tony could care less.
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Male 724
That "Couldn`t care less" thing is something I say to my friends all the time because they always ALWAYS say "I could care less" and it just gets on my nerves!

And I"m American.
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Male 193
haha this was hilarious. i have to say i agree tho - most of what differs between american and english usage makes a LOT of sense (why do i have to spell colour with that "u" - what is it FOR!?). but yeah, could care less has always thrown me a bit.
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Male 85
@madP
That saying didnt origonate in england and even if it did it means wishing goodness upon you.
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Female 332
What about "Good ON you?!" Brits? It`s "GOOD FOR YOU!!!"
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Male 1
English are allowed to speak English incorrectly, ie., Mitchell`s, "Here is me" and "who for whom";
Can I do it too? (Old guy from Florida)
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Male 440
This is also a pet peeve of mine. Well said Mitchell!
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Male 151
but what about negative caring? D:
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Male 100
@Rybo89
No, they are not telling everyone that the English are speaking English *wrong*. That would be bad grammar.
They`re telling everyone that the English are speaking English incorrectly.
/flex :D
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Female 196
jamie76 stop being such a buffoon you silly billy.
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Male 25
oh david mitchell i love you

i don`t comment very often, but, jamie76...are you telling everyone that the ENGLISH are speaking ENGLISH wrong?

i have heard no-one say "ideer"...that`s just stupid...

Oh and Mikeado...good work lol
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Female 136
DickenMcHunt, Peep show is amazing. (:
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Male 1,596
Jamie76, you sir are a buffoon
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Male 2,344
until the Brits stop pronoucing the letter "A" as the letter "R", they need to STFU about how to use the language.

THe word is "Media", not "Medier". It is "idea", not "Ideer"...
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Male 6,693
Ho hum.
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Male 3,915
While we are on the topic....why does the saying:

"You have your work cut out for ya!"

...mean that your work is going to be harder now?

Because it seems to me like some work just got separated from the accumulated work and in turn...lessened the work-load....so what the f*ck?
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Male 3,915
"Don`t worry how i got passed the besieging enemy...i have a secret tunnel or false beard..."
"it`s an inflatable hover fort!"

lmao
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Male 2,159
"watching this guy 30 seconds made me want to stab him with a pitch fork"

I believe you mean "Watching this guy >>for<< 30 seconds" etc. Otherwise you could be implying that "30 seconds" is his name, when his name is actually David Mitchell. But I guess you could care less about that, right?
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Male 102
i like it
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Female 71
Hahahaha YESSS. Thank you video! As an American who was raised by a Brit I identify with the frustration of nonsensical American sayings xD
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Male 2,703
I was sooooo mad during a recent sports game (don`t remember if it was world cup or just a baseball game, might`ve even been just a news show sports highlight) and the idiot said "they could care less what [blah blah blah] thinks", I facepalmed and then yelled at the TV...I`m so tired of idiots in this world. if you don`t know the phrase, or are too stupid to break it down, don`t use it. one of my favorite radio personalities corrected someone on air about it, it`s one of the reasons he`s my favorite...
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Male 1,598
Austin: Listen, dad, if you are are going to say naughty things in front of these American girls then at least speak English English.

Nigel: All right, my son: I could`ve had it away with this cracking Julie, my old China.
Austin: Are you telling a bunch pork-pies and a bag of trout? Because if you are feeling quigly, why not just have a J. Arthur?
Nigel: What, billy no mates?
Austin: Too right, youth.
Nigel: Don`t you remember the crimbo din-din we had with the grotty Scots bint?
Austin: Oh, the one that was all sixes and sevens!
Nigel: Yeah, yeah, she was the trouble and strife of the Morris dancer what lived up the apples and pears!
Austin: She was the barrister what become a bobby in a lorry and...

Austin & Nigel:[complete gibberish]-tea kettle!
Nigel: And then, and then--
Austin & Nigel: She shat on a turtle!
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Male 8
watching this guy 30 seconds made me want to stab him with a pitch fork
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Male 1,299
I couldn`t give a poo about twat that twat twas saying...

P.S. for David Mitchell, Peep Show is boring- please start doing comedy again.
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Male 1,596
fivezones .... football you cretin
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Male 1,021
First half was funny "I couldn`t care less" but the second half on holding the fort was dull and pointless. Like the English soccer team.
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Female 2,026
hahahaha `erbs.
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Female 179
I`m from the US and I`ve understood many things that are said like the I could care less thing
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Male 7
David, I can`t help but notice your ironic choice of seating in the chart. Why don`t you remove that bar that’s up your ass, stop putting things in laitance form in attempts to insult our intelligence, work on your soccer skills, and go get some ortho work done like the rest of America.
Thanks
P.S. Seriously, those soccer skills really need to improve. See you in four years.

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Male 2,868
I was born and raised in the US and I am constantly baffled by the linguistic inadequacies of my coinhabitants here. For fcuks sake, we had a president who said "nucular" for eight goddamn years. That`s how fcuking Homer Simpson pronounces it. Half the time Bush sounded like Early Cotton from Squidbillies.
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Male 45
I love David Mitchell. I agree with everything he just said :D I would add in the thing about Americans calling fillets fillays too (I know that`s not how it`s spelt but that`s how it sounds)
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Female 245
the `could care less` ting annoys me and im from america!
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Male 593
David Mitchell FTW!!!
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Male 39,893
@Spider_sol

english is comprised of many languages. and eXpresso is wrong in any language.

As for me being an idiot...well, I`ve heard that a lot so who am I to buck popular opinion
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Male 2,592
The Brits don`t have hover forts? Man, it must be like living in a third world country.
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Male 1,451
"and another thing!

the is no "X" in espresso!!!!!"

Gerry, I completely agree on this one. But sadly that`s Italian and you`re an idiot.
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Female 961
lol i have s secret tunnel and false beard.

note he has stereotypical british teeth
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Female 449
Haha I love David Mitchell.
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Male 12,365
Max_Normal:

i) Many of us give a damn about the Queen. Firstly, monarchy is a part of our cultural heritage. I realise it`s currently fashionable to deride our own culture while embracing everyone else`s, but I don`t give a damn about being fashional. Secondly, the monarchy brings a fortune into the country. We make a big profit off them, and the Queen is the guts of the monarchy.

ii) None of the Americans I`ve spoken with seemed at all surprised by my speech, which is not like the stereotype you describe. The few I`ve met who`ve come here have been surprised by how much English accents vary over such a short distance, though.

iii) Plenty of people in England give a damn about how Americans speak. It`s interesting to people who are interested in language.

We`re not all parochial oafs dismissive of our own culture and ignorant of everyone`s culture including our own.
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Male 12,365
LillianDulci:

Thanks for the reply. Those other examples of a silent leading `h` are the same in English. Which gave me a clue about `herb`. English `herb` comes direct from the Latin, American `erb` comes from the French (which comes from the Latin).

But it should be spelt `erb` or `erbe` in American English.
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Male 124
That was hilarious.
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Female 8,045
I agree with the `could care less` issue! erb- oh come on- please- it sounds silly!
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Male 4,745
LOL! I love the English!
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Female 855
well, again, the comments were better than the post...thanks youse guys...
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Male 250
it probably makes no sense to you paria because your variation of "english" is so far away from our way of "english" that our english almost seems like another languange despite being the origin of your variation of english
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Male 250
ahh mitchell

if anyone liked this you should checkout something called peepshow and mitchell and webb
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Male 605
drating yes, you should get the rest of Davis podcast, its amazing
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Male 649
I would just like to point out the fact to all of you British folk out there that you people invented the English language and yet at least half of what y`all say makes no damn sense at all. And yes I used y`all.........hows that for the queens English huh lol................just saying
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Male 3,425
I never knew Americans said this anyway, but yeah, there`s no logic whatsoever.
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Male 49
England ftw
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Male 4,546
Also, luckyducky:

"You`d be saying that [the way you`re acting currently] is you [caring]"

If "Acting like you care" and "care" were the same, sure.

They`re not.

"I could care less" is almost universally used to mean "stop talking to me about it", or "I don`t care", or one of many synonyms.

If someone tells me "I could care less", I`m going to keep talking to them, sending them the newsletter, and showing them pictures of it.

After all, they care, at least a little bit right? If they could care less, so what? They don`t CURRENTLY care less, they just could at some future point.

When that future point coincides with them using proper English, they`ll be able to convey to the rest of the world what they mean.
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Male 639
Oh and another one that annoys me, `They got beat`. No they didn`t. they were beaten.
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Male 4,546
Maybe David`s next rant can be on the existence of time and how it organizes our events.

Like how this was on youtube in May, yet apparently is a response to something that occurred only in June.
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Male 12,138
[quote]Yes, that`s right, it`s all about the football...[/quote]
Shhh, don`t tell anyone, but that was what`s known colloquially as "a joke". We know it`s not about football. It was an (apparently poor) attempt at mild topical humour.

Or humor.
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Female 3,001
love it XD
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Male 680
There has been a trend to diverge from the Queens and move to estuary english which has kind of absorbed bits of roosterney. Many people started speaking it in an attempt to fit in be a self made man rather then rich. Then it just spread outwards from London.

Plus its "H"erb, erb just sounds like a term for some weed.

@whoever said it , Hold the fort makes more sense then hold down the fort. You`re holding onto your position at the fort from the besieging enemy. Holding down onto your position doesn`t make sense.

@Max Normal , A lot of people do care about the Queen, Making common mistake many people do about issues. Just because the minority that don`t care are most vocal doesn`t mean they`re the biggest. Ever heard of the silent Majority.
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Male 187
Yes, that`s right, it`s all about the football...
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Male 669
lets just say she doesn`t give a f*ck
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Male 12,138
vv Ha, I watched that one of yours before Wolf. It`s a good `un!
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Male 1,557
Here, have some YouTube goodness on UK vs US English, by an Englishman... ME! :)

UK vs US English
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Male 1,557
@Mothrog who says "earf" ?
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Male 1,557
Love David Mitchell :)
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Male 500
Nobody in England really gives a damn how Americans speak, very few of us give a damn about whether the Queen even exists, very few of us speak like David Mitchell anyway (typical Oxbridge graduate dominating BBC comedy as they always have done), and abosultely none of us whatsoever speak like American stereotypes of British English (which seem to be based on WW2 newsreels and 1960`s British TV). Still if it makes you happy, go for it. please watch this www.youtube.com/watch?v=fmp8cLu7UWI
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Female 2,674
Angilion - Another word where we drop the initial h is hour (our). I can`t think of any others but I know from a young age I was taught hour has a silent h and that herb can be pronounced with or without the h sound (though typically without, here).
Just looked it up, some others are heir (air) and honor (onor).
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Male 385
Gerry1of1 thank God someone else gets it. :)
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Male 1,598
Austin: Listen, dad, if you are are going to say naughty things in front of these American girls then at least speak English English.

Nigel: All right, my son: I could`ve had it away with this cracking Julie, my old China.
Austin: Are you telling a bunch pork-pies and a bag of trout? Because if you are feeling quigly, why not just have a J. Arthur?
Nigel: What, billy no mates?
Austin: Too right, youth.
Nigel: Don`t you remember the crimbo din-din we had with the grotty Scots bint?
Austin: Oh, the one that was all sixes and sevens!
Nigel: Yeah, yeah, she was the trouble and strife of the Morris dancer what lived up the apples and pears!
Austin: She was the barrister what become a bobby in a lorry and...

Austin & Nigel:[complete gibberish]-tea kettle!
Nigel: And then, and then--
Austin & Nigel: She shat on a turtle!
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Male 38
He is talking pish.

...talking P.I.S.H.
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Male 79
at least we say earth not earf
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Male 9,305
"Erbs? Really? You`re French now are you?" XD

Huh, I only heard it "hold down the fort" never heard the other version before.
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Male 39,893
and another thing!

the is no "X" in espresso!!!!!
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Male 12,365
If you`re go for really old English, you wouldn`t even get a semi-Romanic alphabet. Runic script back then. Furthorc, if I recall correctly.
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Male 141
Hold on one cottin pickin second her. If you tell someone that you could care less and you clearly don`t care very much at all wouldn`t that be correctly used? You`d be saying that the way you`re acting currently is you caring at least a little bit, and you could actually drop lower on the not caring scale.
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Male 12,365
[quote]if language didn`t evolve we would still be talk or type to be more exact `ye olde english` and thou wouldnst likest that me thinks. [/quote]

i) That`s early modern English, not old English. Not even middle English.

ii) It`s also wrong for early modern English. I`m far from an expert, but my attempt would be `methinks thou wouldst not liketh that.`

Two famous passages:

Old English:

Hwæt! We Gardena in geardagum,
þeodcyninga, þrym gefrunon,
hu ða æþelingas ellen fremedon.
Oft Scyld Scefing sceaþena þreatum,

*late* middle English, i.e. relatively close to modern English:

Whan that Aprill, with his shoures soote
The droghte of March hath perced to the roote
And bathed every veyne in swich licour,
Of which vertu engendred is the flour;
Whan Zephirus eek with his sweete breeth
Inspired hath in every holt and heeth

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Male 87
Distracted by horrible teeth that looked somewhat fake. Did he add them in making fun of the stereotypes or are those his actual teeth?
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Male 108
For the Record, Old English isn`t that "Whilst thou thee" stuff, If you were to try and read it you`d be confused as all hell.

i.e. "Si þin nama gehalgod" = Hallowed be thy name
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Male 140
Couldn`t care less.
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Male 40
fair point. i didn`t mean to be objectionable. i was reacting to the previous replies. i really dont mind how people express themselves. although i do have a pet hate of `lol` at the end of every sentance, lol.
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Male 245
Actually, DDJay, I`m pretty confident that if we currently spoke "ye olde English", we actually "wouldst like that me thinks." That`s like saying that, given we were all currently speaking old English, we wouldn`t like speaking modern English. Which I`m pretty sure isn`t something that`s really objectionable. It just is what it is. We couldn`t care less.
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Male 40
Oh fair play Sir. RP. one has endeavoured to find the definition and you have come up trumps. good show.
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Male 395
Received Pronunciation FTW!
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Male 40
it is commonly called estuary english. and as with any language it evolves. if language didn`t evolve we would still be talk or type to be more exact `ye olde english` and thou wouldnst likest that me thinks.
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Male 2,551
Haha, I was thinking about this earlier today and getting quite annoyed at people who do that.
:D
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Male 40
also the dropping of letters in speech. i`m from essex and we rarely say our `h`es. and many others in day to day speak. for example ` I have had enough. i am going to go home.` would proberly become ` i`ve `ad nuff. i`m go en `ome.` its clearly hard to convey in text. but i hope you get the gist of what i mean.
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Male 423
I could care less.
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Male 1,598
Pip pip cheerio. Jolly good sir!
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Male 40
i have watched the USA lose to Ghana with a very good american friend, he is gutted. he has been in the UK for 10 years and he still insists on calling the footpath `the sidewalk`. we argue about it regularly. I, of course, insist it is a path that you use your feet on. he, of course, insists that you walk on the side of the road, hence a sidewalk. obviously he is wrong. end of argument.
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Male 12,365
[quote]especially the herb part.

Do Brits really pronounce the "h"?[/quote]

Yes, because it`s there. It wasn`t until I watched a USA cookery program and momentarily wondered what they were talking about that I found out that Americans ignore the `h`.

Are there any other words beginning with `h` that you pronounce without it? Or any other words for which you ignore the first letter? Seems pretty odd to me - why not change the spelling to `erb`?
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Male 914
the queen can suck it
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Male 12,365
[quote]The irony is that philologists state that American English is closer to correct or traditional English than British English is. [/quote]

If you`re looking for tradition, no modern form of English is at all close to traditional English. Modern German is closer to traditional English.

If you`re looking at something more modern and you really want a correct version, then the most correct version of English is English English. The tautology should make that obvious. English from England, the country that English is named for.

Is American English a legitimate dialect? Yes, of course.

Is American English more correct English than English English? No, of course not.
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Male 159
We say aluminum because that`s how it`s spelled over here. Wikipedia knows all.
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Male 12,365
[quote]"Oscola does that change the fact that the U.S. beat England in the first round?"

you didnt. we both drew 2 games and won 1. [/quote]

Look at the group results. USA beat England on the standard second tie-break criterion - goals scored in that part of the tournament.

They`re out, but they played well and showed something new - the USA now has a world class football team.
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Female 195
I am so glad someone finally put straight that could care less issue, it`s been annoying me that people say that for years...

As the great Eddie Izzard said: "We say HERBS because it has a *%!$ing "H" in it." XD
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Male 12,365
[quote]A sidewalk in England is technically called a footway, but most just call it pavement. [/quote]

To head off the "why do they call it that?" posts, it`s because a pavement is a paved area and the pedestrian sections alongside roads were originally paved, at least in Britain.
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Male 12,365
[quote]You wouldn`t say Iridum, Helum, Uranum, Potassum, Sodum etc., so why say Aluminum?[/quote]

If I recall correctly, `aluminum` was a printing error that somehow stuck.
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Male 182
"I know they say aluminum very oddly"

We pronounce it "Al-ewe-min-ee-um" because it`s spelled "AluminIum". The "ium" is used as a suffix in a LOT of elements in the periodic table.

You wouldn`t say Iridum, Helum, Uranum, Potassum, Sodum etc., so why say Aluminum?
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Male 1,237
ps `oftentimes` as a word.. grr
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Male 424
I got asked in Florida if I knew the queen.... Then the woman went off to tell her husband what a lovely "Australian" she met.
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Female 695
"Holding down the fort" is NOT a stupid expression. It`s a metaphor. You`re holding it down so it won`t get away from you and into the enemies hands. Sure it`s an extra word, but I see nothing wrong with that.

"Also, can someone please make a counter-video explaining how British people say these words? I know they say aluminum very oddly, but what do they call the sidewalk? And how do they say research? "

Al-oo-MIN-ee-um

A sidewalk in England is technically called a footway, but most just call it pavement.

As for how they say research it`s not THAT different. Reh-SEARCH.
We Americans say "REE-search".
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Female 838
the one that gets me is the people who say supposably when its supposedly, the other term that makes me cringe is "ain`t never"
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Male 12
The term "I could care less" would convey not being able to care less if the speaker was being sarcastic. We all know how sarcastic those Americans are!

Unlucky going out USA, I was rooting for you!
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Male 1,237
"and please...learn the destinction between a Boy-Toy and a Toy-Boy. Used in a sentance....

Madonna is the original Boy-Toy.
Anston Cusher is Demi Moore`s Toy-Boy.

The Toy-Boy cannot be a Boy-Toy unless he is gay in which case the correct phrase is "Twinkie".

Okay, got that?"

I hate to be a spelling nazi, but in the case of a language thread...
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Male 2,850
The one that grates on me is the superfluous "at" in phrases such as "Where are you at?", as "Where are you" conveys exactly the same information.

The extra "at" adds no meaning, and just makes the speaker sound uneducated (in the same way that "ain`t" does).
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Male 1,357
Nahh, it`s David Mitchell, he literally COULDN`T care less about football, being the privately educated gentleman that he is.
And ajr2006, you obviously don`t even follow the footy, because:
1) USA 1 - 1 England, is a draw... NOT a win. Learn to count you plebeian
2) It`s the `group stage`, not the first round. Round implies that it is a knockout stage.
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Male 3,331
"`Oscola does that change the fact that the U.S. beat England in the first round?`

"you didnt. we both drew 2 games and won 1."

We (The US) were ranked higher because we had more goals. But now we`re out of it, so it doesn`t really matter.
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Male 3,331
I found it funny, but there`s one problem. We (in the US) DON`T speak The Queen`s English. We speak a dialect called American English. While is point is valid about caring less, to speakers of American English, holding down the fort makes perfect sense. We`re not literally holding it down. I could make a similar argument about "holding the fort" making no sense. You don`t actually hold onto the fort, you`re holding it in a military sense. For that reason, saying I`m holding down the fort makes just as much sense, assuming the term holding down is understood to mean the same thing. And, in American English, it does.
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Male 249
"Oscola does that change the fact that the U.S. beat England in the first round?"

you didnt. we both drew 2 games and won 1.

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Male 41
Also why do people say: "you do the math" It`s maths! ssssss! It`s not called mathematic it`s called mathematics. Plus why wouldn`t you pronounce the `h`?
Anyway people should remember, myself included, that the English language does maintain certain rules however the English language is also very organic in the sense that it grows and changes to adapt to contempary culture.
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Male 86
ajr2006, I`m afraid your country can`t say much until we lose horribly tomorrow
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Female 61
This was way too long and annoying.
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Male 30
Huzzah David Mitchell! Clever humor is good.
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Male 1,343
why do you need the modifier `down` in the expression for it to be used? it doesn`t mean anything, and if it did the only logical ways it could be used imply that the fort is going to come down
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Male 943
Oscola does that change the fact that the U.S. beat England in the first round?
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Male 349
You should delete the sub-title for this link seeming as the USA just got battered by Ghana
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Male 943
@iamthe moose NO, you hold down the fort so the wind doesn`t blow it over. ;)
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Male 1,343
which means you should wait for the wind to knock it down, and then HOLD it down..?
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Male 943
Orrrr the fort is just really poorly constructed and is more or less just a tent and you`re holding it down in case a strong gust of wind comes by to take down your fort.
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Male 249
"Bah. We reckon it`s just sour grapes since the US topped England in their World Cup Group.."

how`d that work out for you?
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Female 59
"Oh, and one last thing: is it just an American failing, or do other English speakers say etcetera "eck-set-er-a" as though there is no first T also? I hate that so much. It`s not ect. It`s etc."

I`ve never heard anyone pronounce it that way... Are you sure you haven`t just been hearing it wrong? Etc is short for et cetera and that`s how I pronounce it.

In other news: I love David Mitchell. As in, I really fancy him. I wish he would marry me.

*swoon*
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Male 3,619
I often used "i could care less" but atleast i used it in the right way.

him: Do you really care if the car is red or blue?
me: no, but i could care less.
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Male 2
Ahahaha! I never got why people say "I could care less," because it really only raises the question as to how much you do care. I`m an American and I`ve always said "I couldn`t care less" because, well, it always seemed to make more sense to me.

Anyway, as for other things (such as differences in spelling and pronunciation), I couldn`t care less! As Americans, we have a different dialect, and that`s fine. Just as the Spanish language has different dialects in the various countries in which it is spoken.

Actually, I wonder if the Spanish are as petty about the origins of their language as some English people are.
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Female 525
lol..david mitchell rocks!
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Male 1,054
The irony is that philologists state that American English is closer to correct or traditional English than British English is.

And the Queen speaks ebonics off-camera.
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Male 970
at 1:55 you clearly see that he`s got no balls
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Male 103
@Seastone
As already mentioned we say aluminium, because well that`s what it`s called (it says so on the periodic table) and to my knowledge I don`t know anyone who says ecksetera, but then again I live in Switzerland.
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Male 153
Inchworm!!!!!!
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Male 3,255
That was awesome.
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Male 748
@Seastone

AluminIum - we spell it with an i in between the n and the u.

Pavement = sidewalk.

I say `research` in different ways depending on how I phrase the sentence:

: I need to do some `ree-search`
: I need to `ri-search` something (`ri` like wrist)

I don`t really know how other people say it.
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Male 748
I saw this ages ago, it`s not sour grapes..............Americans are just stupid. ;D

I could care less though.
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Male 25,416
wow, me learning!
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Female 612
I realized the "couldn`t care less" thing when I was quite young and have been saying it properly ever since, even though no one else on our side of the pond seems to get it.

Also, can someone please make a counter-video explaining how British people say these words? I know they say aluminum very oddly, but what do they call the sidewalk? And how do they say research?

Oh, and one last thing: is it just an American failing, or do other English speakers say etcetera "eck-set-er-a" as though there is no first T also? I hate that so much. It`s not ect. It`s etc.
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Female 15,763
Most of the people that I know that are aware of this are American. On that same vein, most of the people that I know that violate this are British.

Both sides of the pond are respectively bad at grammar and their own brands of English.

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Female 718
Yes we do sheaton319, because it isn`t a silent H...
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Male 39,893
and please...learn the destinction between a Boy-Toy and a Toy-Boy. Used in a sentance....

Madonna is the original Boy-Toy.
Anston Cusher is Demi Moore`s Toy-Boy.

The Toy-Boy cannot be a Boy-Toy unless he is gay in which case the correct phrase is "Twinkie".

Okay, got that?
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Male 628
lol! awesome!
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Female 387
"lol that was great

especially the herb part.

Do Brits really pronounce the "h"?"

Yes.
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Male 69
90% of America will never understand this.
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Male 12,138
[quote]This is more than a month old whoever made the caption needs to get a brain[/quote]
I wrote the caption. I`m British. I know it`s a month old, I know who David Mitchell is, and I know he hates football. This is I-Am-Bored.com, not the f*cking Sunday Times. Christ.
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Female 696
I hate it when people get the phrase "Couldn`t care less" wrong. I feel just like this guy on the subject.
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Female 430
[email protected] going across screen at 2:55. XD
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Male 559
lol that was great

especially the herb part.

Do Brits really pronounce the "h"?
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Male 5
This is more than a month old whoever made the caption needs to get a brain
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Female 839
Yes i have noticed American`s saying that, even in a Greenday song
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Male 1,929
What the hell is David Mitchell doing? Sounds like a right knobhead.

And yes, he doesn`t care about football and this was posted to youtube over a month a go.

And by-the-by, the USA v Ghana game is shockingly abismal. It`s awful.
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Male 41
It`s not sour grapes this was before the world cup and this man doesn`t like football.
It`s probably the fact you can`t understand a language you`ve had for over 200 years
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Male 2,440
I could care less about this video. :)
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Male 12,138
Link: I Could Care Less English PSA [Rate Link] - Bah. We reckon it`s just sour grapes since the US topped England in their World Cup Group...
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