Liquid Freezes When Poured

Submitted by: buddy 9 years ago Science
/media/52134_liquidfreezes.flv
Not sure what this is, but it"s cool.
There are 67 comments:
Male 177
It is supersaturated, and supercooled.
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Male 51
lol the last image looked like a hand holding a pole of something like a flag...pretty colors!
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Male 1
This video was the photoshoot for an article the magazine Popular Science ran in their Oct 2007 issue. http://www.popsci.com/popsci/how20/40eb7...
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Female 214
NOT ANOTHER EFFING VIDEO LIKE THIS. Did we not bring out enough idiots last time? And, if this is sodium acetate or whatever, then it is NOT A REPOST, BECAUSE THE OTHER EFFING VIDEO WAS SUPERCOOLING BECAUSE IT SAID SO IN THE YOUTUBE TITLE OF THE VIDEO.

Kthanks.

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Female 1,397
We can build ice cities now! The possibilities are endless...
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Male 1,114
Its reacting with air, i think...
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Male 9
^^ well, I get what you are saying about super cooling, but the bottle does say sodium acetate, and it is behaving alot like supersaturated sodium acetate (see link)
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Male 9
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Female 207
NorwayFTW, the bottle says sodium acetate on it. -_-
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Female 1,492
it looked like they were trying to make sculptures out of it...
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Male 312
Says sodium acetate on bottle

bitches

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Female 416
R-E-P-O-S-T. no more magically freezing liquids okay? If we want to see stuff freeze we now have at least three vids.

we`re all good in this category now, it`s done.

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Male 2,486
I drink this stuff, it`s amazing.
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Male 90
SHOPPED!! Jaykayz. Pretty cool stuff.
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Female 13
:D I`m always insanely glad when someone else reads XKCD.

On the subject, spontaneously freezing liquids = fun.

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Male 599
OMGAWD A MAGIC BOTTLE!!!! rofl.
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Female 43
supercooling. thats how freezing rain is made supercooled water drops are liquid in the air but when they hit an object (like the ground) they immediatly freeze on it. i just did a project on it.
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Male 341
I know how to make this, also I saw a video about how. But as I am lazy, I will not post it. :P Ironically one of the steps is to boil the liquid. :P
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Male 177
^^true. When ur drunk or high.
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Male 2,781
ANYBODY HEARD OF SUPERCOOLING? I SEE THAT AT HOME A LOT WHEN I GET A BOTTLE OF WATER OUT OF THE FREEZER. IT`S ACTUALLY A LIQUID AT FIRST BUT THEN IT STARTS FREEZING UP WHEN I OPEN IT AND START POURING IT. ANNOYING SOMETIMES WHEN I`M REALLY THIRSTY. THIS IS LIKE HIGH SCHOOL SCIENCE STUFF.

ALL THOSE IDIOTS WITH THEIR `SODIUM ACETATE` OMGZZORZZZ!!! IT`S ALIEN BLOOD!!!!

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Male 177
^^true. just keep it at more than 58.4°C until it`s all molten and you can do it again.
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Male 788
Put it in a thick plastic bag and boil it and you can do it again..! i think?
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Male 177
I`m making my thesis on sodium acetate trihydrate so I know a few things about it. First of all, this is called supercooling, meaning that a substance remains in its liquid state below its melting point. It will become a solid when activated, e.g. by adding a few crystals to it. Then it will crystallize, giving off some heat.
duhx99: Look up supercooling instead of supersaturation. Secondly, freezing is a pretty good term, since that basically means the opposite of melting. Just not at the freezing point of water but at 58.4°C.

dim3wit: It`s actually sodium acetate trihydrate, which melts at a much lower temperature than the actual sodium acetate, so your comment makes no sense. It`s not disguised as a liquid, it IS a liquid.

NorwayFTW: not all salts can be liquid at room temperature. Some can, though.

Tiredofnicks: it is not the only commonly available salt that behaves that way, take Glauber`s salt, it behaves the same way, only at lower temperature.

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Male 869
Cool. I can do the reverse and pour ice out and have it turn to liquid :-P
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Female 2,552
This is way too old.
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Male 94
I reckon they did it in reverse and played it backwards. Yeah. I have no idea either.
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Male 32
meh . . . .
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Male 598
REPOST!!!!!
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Male 1,497
Cy, that isnt what i would call proof that it was a repost, it didnt even loook the same, geeze this 1 was far better
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Male 1,497
Ive never seen this before, so i dont care if it is a repost!

its a damn cool substance!

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Female 584
At least you wouldn`t have to worry about spilling any.
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Male 239
liquid nitrogen! That bottle must be boiling hot for that to work...
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Male 5,094
NorwayFTW: Sodium acetate is the only commonly available salt that behaves in that way.
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Female 2,220
Was that a statue in the second thing?!
Because...
seriously.

It looked like an old chinese man, a lady, and a lion.
Did anyone else see that!?

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Male 114
reusable handwarmer liquid!
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Female 30
yeah isn`t this that sodium acetate stuff you find in handwarmers? this stuff is awesome.
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Female 91
looks like wax?
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Male 145
There is no way of talling if its sodium acetate, it could be any salt basically...
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Male 773
whats with all the beeping and clicking? its not necessary....
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Male 2
If you can hear the clicking in the background, that is in fact a camera. This was a photo shoot for the Magazine Popular Science in the How 2.0 section for this month. I just read that part of the magazine yesterday and then seen this video, kinda creepy. and yes Duhx99 is correct on that is is sodium acetate and water.
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Male 1,289
reminds me of that falling sand game, pretty sweeeeet.
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Male 870
For all intents and purposes, this is a REPOST
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Male 9
Well, since it`s melting point is 324 °C , it was already frozen to begin with. It was just mixed with water, which disguised it as a liquid. your explanation fills out the rest, duhx, but I just wanted to share the idea that some chemicals need not be cold to be frozen... take steel for instance, or a rock ;-)
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Male 2
scott and majorchaoz are both right

The solution itself is just sodium acetate and water. The sodium acetate is mixed with water at a high temperature until saturated, meaning the water can no longer dissolve the sodium acetate. Then, the water is chilled, thus lowering its saturation point, causing it to become supersaturated. This means that the solution actually contains more dissolved sodium acetate then it should under those conditions. This causes the sodium acetate to crystallize when it is agitated and comes in contact with small particles called `seeds`. The crystallization forms around the so called `seeds` when the solution seperates.

And most people will probably say this is too long, but hopefully there are people out there like me who are too lazy to search previous pages for a video.

PS: it isn`t really considered `freezing`, especially because the crystals that are formed are actually warm. dunno what phoenix is talking about...

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Male 592
Yeah, but it`s a nice semi-repost. It is sodium acetate. If you look closely at the container in this video it`s even labeled.
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Male 4
Maybe repost, but it`s cool anyway. You can see figures in it, what makes it kinda trippy ;-)
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Male 388
Triple Post!
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Male 63
This must be the photo shoot for Popular Science issue Oct 2007 (pg.80).

And yes, I told everyone first: It is sodium acetate trihydrate. Look back, you`ll find it.

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Female 168
UGH. Did this have to be posted?
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Female 1,158
yeah, technically a repost.
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Male 33
if you close your eyes and listen, it sounds like on a porn set.
..and, yea, the one with explanations was better.
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Male 4,012
technical repost.
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Male 4,246
Hey Phoenix:
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Male 888
Not sure what this is? It`s old.
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Male 1,072
Instant ice anyone seen it before!
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Male 570
older than old
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Female 2,927
cool now if only they can make it into diffrent colors you have the next gen answer to grow your own crystals kit.
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Male 383
easy. super saturated solution. chem class in hs. yes, many of us americans ARE smart, hehe.
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Female 120
Interesting. Could have been more informative though.
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Male 55
actually its sodium acetate making crystals at a rapid rate
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Male 280
Male 280
Already a video about this...

Basically the water is very pure so there`s nothing for the ice crystals to begin forming around even though the water is at a temperature lower than 0c so it stays liquid in the bottle.

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Male 270
And each time, it isn`t actually freezing.
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Male 290
in fact, i think this is about the third freezing liquid post :/
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Female 115
Yep, there sure was. :-/
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Male 238
Wasn`t there another video and an explanation?
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Male 10,115
Link: Liquid Freezes When Poured [Rate Link] - Not sure what this is, but it`s cool.
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